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R 

378.756 
At63b 
1993-94 
c.2 





19934994 
GENERAL CATALOG 



BULLETIN OF BARTON COLLEGE 



3 7S.75& 

c i S 



Telephone (919) 399-6300 
FAX (919) 237-4957 
TDD (919) 399-6425 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 1993-1994 
A SENIOR COLLEGE FOR MEN AND WOMEN 



The 1993 -1994 Barton College Catalog cover was designed by 

Michelle Lynn Ludwig, a senior commercial design major 

from Cape Carteret, North Carolina. 






2 /College Map 



Athletic Complex 
Legend 

1. Complex Manager 

2. Field House 

3. Baseball Field 

4. Practice Field 

5. Softball Field 

6. Soccer Field 



Barton College 

Athletic Complex 




College Map / 3 




Barton College 

Main Campus 



B 



College St. 



1. Hardy Center 

Admissions Offices 
Administrative Offices 

Belk Hall 

Business Office 
Registrar 

Hamlin Student Center and Cafeteria 

Lee Infirmary 

Nursing Education Building 
. The Still Point 
. Howard Chapel 

8. Willis Hackney Library 

9. Stage and Script Workshop 

10. Psychology House 

11. HinesHall 

12. Case Art Building 

13. Roma Hackney Music Building 

14. Lifelong Education and The Writing Center 

15. Wilson Gym 

16. Moye Science Hall 

17. Hackney Hall -Coed 

18. Harper Hall - Coed 

19. Hilley Hall - Women 

20. Waters Hall - Men 

21 . Wenger Hall - Women 

22. Hardy Alumni Hall 

23. President's Home 

24. Tennis Courts 

25. Tennis Courts and Intramural Field 

26. Fountain 




| Brick walk 
J Faculty Parking 
J Student Parking 
&. Handicapped 

V Visitors 



Nash St. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

College Maps 2 

General Information 5 

Admissions 9 

Expenses 12 

Financial Aid 14 

Student Life 36 

Academic Information 42 

Courses of Instruction 63 

Board of Trustees 160 

Administration 161 

Faculty 163 

Academic Calendar 169 

Alumni Association 171 

Calendar 172 

Index 173 

Barton College accepts students without regard to handicap, race, color, national ori- 
gin, religion or sex. The College does not discriminate in administration of its educa- 
tional and employment policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic or other 
school-administered programs. Barton College is authorized under federal law to enroll 
non-immigrant alien students. 

Barton College is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 

This Catalog was prepared to answer questions about Barton College and its curricu- 
lum. While information was current at the time of publication (March 1, 1993), it is sub- 
ject to change without notice. Failure to read this catalog does not excuse students 
from the requirements and regulations described herein. 



General Information / 5 



BARTON COLLEGE briefly 

A four-year, private, co-ed, liberal arts college. 



LOCATION. Wilson, North Carolina (population 35,000), located 45 miles east of 
North Carolina's capital city of Raleigh and seven miles east of Interstate 95 (the main 
route between New York and Florida). The city is served by Amtrak and by one bus 
company. Commercial air service is available at the Rocky Mount-Wilson Airport and 
at Raleigh-Durham Airport. 

ENROLLMENT. Approximately 1 ,700; nearly half of these reside on campus. The 
College has students from 20 states and 10 foreign countries. 

ACADEMICS. Eleven departments offering 44 majors. Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science, Bachelor of Fine Arts, and Bachelor of Liberal Studies are awarded. 

CALENDAR. Early semester. Full-time students carry from 12 to 18 semester hours 
each term. Two summer terms are also available. 

ACCREDITATION. Barton College is accredited by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools, the North Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities, 
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, the North Carolina State 
Department for Public Instruction, the North Carolina Board of Nursing, the National 
League for Nursing, and the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation 
of the American Medical Association. It is also a member of the American Council on 
Education, the North Carolina Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, 
the Independent College Fund of North Carolina, the Division of Higher Education of 
the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), and the Council of Baccalaureate and Higher 
Degree Programs of the National League of Nursing. 

HISTORY. In 1901 the North Carolina Christian Missionary Convention purchased 
Kinsey Seminary from the Wilson Education Association. In 1902 Barton College, 
under its former name of Atlantic Christian College, was incorporated by the State of 
North Carolina. J. C. Coggins was named its first president. The College opened with a 
capacity enrollment of 107 in September. In May 1922, the College was recognized as 
a standard A-grade institution by the North Carolina Board of Education. In 1956, the 
College was accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. On 
September 6, 1990, the College name was changed to Barton College in honor of 
Barton W. Stone, a principal founder of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). 
Barton College has been served by 10 presidents and two acting presidents: J. C. 
Coggins (1902-1904); J. J. Harper (1904-1908); J. C. Caldwell (1908-1916); R. A. 
Smith (1916-1920); H. S. Hilley (1920-1949); Cecil A. Jarman, Acting President (1949- 
1950); D. Ray Lindley (1950-1953); Travis A. White (1953-1956); Arthur D. Wenger 
(1956-1977); Milton L. Adams, Acting President (1977-1978); Harold C. Doster (1978- 
1 983); James B. Hemby, Jr. (1 983- ). 



6 / General Information 



STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 



i 

The College is organized to maintain and operate an institution of learning, for the edu- 
cation and instruction of qualified students within the framework of Christian ideals and 
principles and under the auspices of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in North 
Carolina. 

The College Charter 



II 

Barton College is a community of learners freely examining the intellectual and cultural 
experiences of a diverse and interdependent world to understand humanity's rich her- 
itage and to improve the quality of all existence. 



General Information / 7 



FACILITIES 



The main campus is located approximately 10 blocks northwest of downtown Wilson. 

Mary Irwin Belk Hall (1956) was named to honor a member of the Belk family of 
Charlotte, North Carolina. It houses Administrative offices. 

Case Art Building (1966) was named to honor S. Perry Case, who served the 
College in many capacities from 1916 to 1960. He held the following positions: 
Professor of Biblical Literature and Religious Education, Professor of Philosophy, 
Professor of Arts, Dean and Professor of Education, and Registrar. The building 
houses a classroom, studios, galleries (including the Lula E. Rackley Gallery), and 
offices for the Department of Communication, Performing and Visual Arts. 

Hackney Hall (1960) was named to honor the Hackney family. Three members of the 
family served the College as Chairman of the Board of Trustees. Residence hall. 

Roma Hackney Music Building (1963): Classrooms, practice rooms, listening facili- 
ties, and offices for the music and communications faculty. The building also hous- 
es the College's library for recordings and musical scores. Wilson Educational 
Television (WEDT) maintains studio, production and playback facilities in the build- 
ing. WEDT produces and cablecasts original programming for the location cable 
company. 

Willis N. Hackney Library (1977) was named in honor of a friend of the College. The 
library, which has seating for 250 readers, is open at least 85 hours per week to 
serve the college community. Its resources are also available to the residents of the 
Wilson community. The library's collection includes over 150,000 volumes, as well 
as a substantial collection of non-print materials. It subscribes to 1220 periodicals, 
16 newspapers, and is a depository for selected U.S. Government documents. 
Most of the library collection is kept in an open shelf system. The Media Center 
provides checkout services for audio-visual equipment. There are facilities for pho- 
tocopying, overhead transparency production, audio tape duplication, and various 
video production services. The Curriculum Library is located on the second floor 
of Hackney Library. This collection includes copies of textbooks and other resource 
material used in the public schools of North Carolina. 

Hamlin Student Center (1967) was named to honor C.H. Hamlin, longtime Professor 
of Social Studies. The center houses the campus cafeteria, Bully's snack bar, 
bookstore, post office, Student Activities offices, lounge and recreation areas. 

Hardy Alumni Hall (1935) was named to honor Bert Hardy, nephew of Clarence 
Leonard Hardy. The building has a large room used for campus meetings. The 
building also has the Trustees' Room. The basement houses the Maintenance 
Department. 

Hardy Center (1951) was named for Clarence Leonard Hardy (1877-1950), of Maury, 
North Carolina, a longtime (1926-1949) trustee of the College. The building houses 
the offices of the President of the College, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, 
other Administrative offices, the Department of Mathematics, classrooms, and the 
Carolina Discipliana Collection. This collection is a rich and unique source relat- 
ing to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and other religious movements. 

Harper Hall (1 950) was named to honor the Harper family. James John Harper (1841- 
1908) served as President of the College. President Harper's daughters, Frances F. 
Harper and Myrtle L. Harper, served as Professor of Mathematics and as College 
Livrarian, respectively. Administrative offices are on the first floor. The upper floors 
provide dormitory rooms. The building also houses the Sarah Bain Ward Parlor. 
named for the former Dean of Women. The parlor is used for college receptions. 



8 / General Information 



Hilley Hall (1966): Residence hall named for Howard Stevens Hilley, a former 
Professor of Ancient and Modern Languages who became President of the College 
in 1921. 

J.W. Hines Hall (1956) was named to honor James Williams Hines (1858-1928), of 
Rocky Mount, North Carolina. He left a significant sum to the College upon his 
death on the eve of the Great Depression. Hines Hall is the largest classrooom 
building on campus housing the Departments of Business Programs; English and 
Modern Languages; Education; History, Social Sciences and Social Work; and 
Religion and Philosophy. The Education Media Center, located on the first floor, 
contains audio-visual materials and equipment necessary for students seeking 
teacher certification. The Language Laboratory, located on the second floor, is a 
computerized facility providing opportunities for supervised class instruction in mod- 
ern language and speech courses. Students may use the facility outside of sched- 
uled class time. 

Howard Chapel (1930) was named to honor Curtis William Howard, a longtime trustee 
and minister of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). 

Lee Infirmary (1956) was named to honor College friends Mr. and Mrs. Don E. Lee of 
Arapahoe, North Carolina. 

Lifelong Education and The Writing Center: Houses the offices for Lifelong 
Education. The Writing Center provides tutoring staff for any student seeking indi- 
vidual help with writing skills. 

Moye Science Hall (1956) was named for Lawrence A. Moye, of Maury, North 
Carolina, a former trustee of the College. The building houses the Department of 
Biological and Physical Sciences. 

Nursing Education Building (1976): Classrooms, laboratory and offices for the 
Department of Nursing. 

President's Home (1923) at 800 West Nash Street was given to the college by the 
Graves family in 1 984. The house is considered one of the finest examples of neo- 
Georgian architecture in North Carolina. 

Psychology House: Offices for the Department of Psychology. 

Stage and Script Workshop: Center for the construction of sets for campus plays. 

Still Point (1974): Campus meditation center. 

Waters Hall (1968) is a residence hall named for John Mayo Waters, who served the 
College in several capacities: Professor of Bible and Religious Education, 
Endowment Secretary, Special Assistant to the President, and Business Manager. 

Wenger Hall (1970) is a residence hall named for Arthur D. Wenger, former President 
of the College. 

Wilson Gymnasium (1966) was named to honor the many contributions made to the 
College by the citizens of the City of Wilson. The building houses the gymnasium, 
classrooms, locker rooms, offices for the Athletic Director, and offices for the 
Department of Physical Education and Sports Studies. 

Approximately six blocks to the northwest of the main campus is the Athletic 
Complex. This thirty-acre property, dedicated in 1979, has fields for soccer, base- 
ball, and Softball. The Field House on the property was completed in 1993. 



Admissions / 9 



ADMISSIONS 



Barton College admits students on the basis of individual merit without regard to age, 
sex, race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin, or handicap. Application forms may be 
requested from the Office of Admissions. Many high school counselors also have 
application forms. 

FRESHMAN STUDENTS 

Admission Requirements 

To be considered for admission one must: 

(1) Have a high school diploma or its equivalent with a total of at least 12 college 
preparatory units. These units may be chosen from academic courses in English, 
Mathematics, History and Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, or Foreign 
Languages. 

(2) Take the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and achieve a score, which when consid- 
ered along with the high school record, will predict probable success in college. 
The American College Testing Program (ACT) score is also acceptable. 

Application Procedures 

To apply for admission to the College one must: 

(1) Submit a completed application form along with a non-refundable $20 application 
fee. 

( 2 ) Arrange to have an official transcript of high school credits sent to the Admissions 
Office. 

(3) Have a copy of SAT or ACT scores sent to the Admissions Office from College 
Board or American College Testing. The SAT is given in January, March, May, 
June, October, November and December. The SAT should be taken during the 
May or June testing dates in the junior year of high school. The SAT should be 
taken again during the first semester of the senior year in high school. A student 
can obtain an application form to take the test from a high school counselor or by 
writing to the College Board. When registering for either the SAT or the ACT, a stu- 
dent should use the College code numbers: #5016 for SAT and #3066 for the ACT. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

To transfer to the College from another college or university, one must send the 
Admissions Office: 

0) The admission application form. A non-refundable $20 application fee. 
(2) Official transcripts of all college work taken at other institutions. (Transcripts of high 
school records may be requested in certain cases.) 

Admission Criteria 

College-level credits earned at another regionally accredited college and/or technical 
institute may be transferred to the College if they meet the following criteria: 
0) If the course to be transferred parallels a course offered by the College. 

(2) If the student has graduated from a two-year institution, all passing grades in paral- 
lel courses are eligible for transfer. 

(3) If the student has maintained a "C" average in college-level work from all other 
institutions, all passing grades are eligible for transfer. 

(4) If a student has achieved a grade of "C" or above in the second semester of a con- 
tinuing course, then both semesters are eligible for transfer. 

(5) Applicant must be eligible to return to the institution last attended. An exception 
may be made for a student ineligible on a disciplinary basis if special clarification 
from the previous institution is obtained. Concealing a disciplinary ineligibility at the 
time of application to the College is grounds for dismissal from the College. 



10/ Admissions 



Transfer Credit 

(1) No more than 64 semester hours are accepted when a student transfers from a 
two-year institution. 

(2) Quality points for graduation and continuous enrollment are computed on the 
Barton College work only. Graduation honors are computed on all college work 
attempted. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Barton College admits some students who do not fit the above listed categories: 

(1) College graduates who are interested in further study at the College. Such appli- 
cants are admitted if they fulfill the requirements for admission to desired courses. 

(2) Persons over the age of 21 who have not graduated from high school. These indi- 
viduals may demonstrate preparedness for college-level work by taking special 
achievement and aptitude tests. 

(3) High school students are allowed to take course work at the College if permission 
is obtained from the high school principal. Such students need to take the PSAT or 
the SAT with scores in the upper half of national norms for college-bound students 
and/or rank in the upper quarter of the high school class. 

PROBATIONARY ADMISSION THROUGH THE OFFICE OF LIFELONG EDUCATION 

Applicants who do not meet the regular admissions requirements and who are 18 years 
of age or older may be admitted into the Office of Lifelong Education under a probation- 
ary program and apply for acceptance into the regular college upon satisfactory comple- 
tion of at least 15 semester hours of approved College work with a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.00. Applicants who do not meet the regular admissions requirements 
and who are 17 years old or younger may be admitted into the Office of Lifelong 
Education of the College as probationary students if permission is obtained from the 
high school principal. Of the first 15 credit hours, six must come from core curriculum 
requirements. Students failing to achieve a 2.00 in the first 15 hours may continue to 
enroll in approved courses in an effort to bring the cumulative grade point average to a 
2.00. A student may not attempt more than 30 semester hours under this classification. 
Failure to achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.00 after attempting 30 semester 
hours will result in ineligibility for any additional work with any unit of the College. All stu- 
dents admitted under probationary status are required to take College Success Program 
(CSP) courses and the minimum of 15 hours and the maximum of 30 hours are exclu- 
sive of CSP credits. Lifelong Education financial aid is limited to students who are 
enrolled in no more than nine semester hours. Application for admission into the regular 
college or into the Office of Lifelong Education may be obtained from either the 
Admissions Office or the Office of Lifelong Education. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

Barton College encourages applications from international students and is dedicated to 
providing the best possible arena for international education. In its recruitment and 
admissions program the College seeks a diverse student body and strives to admit quali- 
fied students from varied national and cultural backgrounds. The admission of interna- 
tional students requires careful and timely analysis of educational credentials and tran- 
scripts. It is also imperative that credentials be submitted for evaluation in order to allow 
adequate time for the processing of appropriate visa information through U.S. con- 
sulates and embassies abroad. In addition, international students must submit proof of 
economic support sufficient to cover the costs associated with attending the College, 
and demonstrate knowledge of the English language sufficient to comprehend written 
and verbal assignments. To be considered for admission an international student must: 



Admissions / 1 1 



(1) Submit official transcripts of all academic work completed beyond the elementary 
school level. These credentials must be received in the Admissions Office of the 
College no later than July 1 for admission into the Fall term which begins in late 
August, and November 1 for admission into the Spring term which begins in 
January. If the original transcript is not in English, a certified translation must be 
provided. 

(2) Submit proof of ability to pay for at least the first year of study. This may be done 
either by sending a check to cover expenses or providing valid bank statements 
clearly denoting the ability to pay and the method of payment. A Certificate of 
Financial Responsibility must also be completed. All bills must be paid in full at the 
time of registration. 

(3) If English is not the native language, provide proof of adequate English skills. This 
may be done either by submitting a Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) score high enough to demonstrate competency (generally a score of 525 
or greater), or enrolling in the English Language Schools program and passing 
English level 109 as defined by ELS. Information on the various ELS programs and 
sites in the U.S. can be obtained by writing 5761 Buckingham Parkway/Culver City, 
California 90203/U.S.A. Phone: (213) 642-0988 Fax: (213) 410-4688. 

(4) An admissions decision will be made once all required documentation has been 
received by the Admissions Office. A Form I-20 will be issued to all accepted inter- 
national students. 

READMITTED STUDENTS 

A student who withdraws from the College must again apply for admission to the 
College in order to re-enroll. 

ACCEPTANCE PROCEDURE AND FEES 

The Admissions Office reviews all applications to Barton College on a rolling admis- 
sions plan. As soon as all required materials have been received by the Admissions 
Office, they are reviewed and acted upon. Each applicant is notified promptly. A stu- 
dent offered admission to the College needs to confirm the decision to attend the 
College by sending a $100 tuition deposit within thirty days. This advance deposit is 
credited to the tuition account for the first term. The deposit is fully refundable if written 
notice to withdraw from the College is received prior to May 1. No refunds will be 
granted after this date. A student accepted after May 1 will have fifteen days to make 
the advance tuition deposit. 

Barton College reserves the right to reject any application without explanation. 

IMMUNIZATIONS 

Each accepted student will receive a medical information form. North Carolina state 
law requires each student attending a four-year institution to submit proof of immuniza- 
tions prior to enrollment. The medical report and proof of immunization record must be 
completed and returned to the College prior to the first day of class. Failure to provide 
proper documentation of immunizations will result in dismissal from the College. 
Exceptions to this law may be made only for bona fide documented medical and reli- 
gious reasons. 



12 / Financial Information 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



Spring 
Semester 

$3,531.50 


Academic 
Year 

$7,063.00 


831.50 
831.50 
150.00 


1,663.00 

1 ,663.00 

300.00 




$200 
$10,889 



EXPENSES 

FULL-TIME ENROLLMENT 

(12-18 Semester Hours) 

Fall 
Semester 

Tuition $3,531.50 

ROOm (double occupancy, includes air conditioning 

and local telephone) 831 .50 

Board 831.50 

General Fee 150.00 

Health Insurance Plan (Required for all students 

who do not show proof of comparable coverage) 
Total for students living on campus 

Total for students living off campus $7,563 

Note: 

Costs are subject to change. 
Students enrolled in more than 18 hours will be charged $256 for each additional 

semester hour over 18 except when that enrollment is in a music ensemble. 
The board fee covers 21 meals per week. There are no refunds for absences. Barton 
College reserves the right to revise this arrangement as necessary in order that the 
food service may be operated in the best interest of the College and the students. 

PART-TIME ENROLLMENT 

(1-11 Semester Hours) 

Tuition $299 per semester hour for non-qualifying Lifelong 

Education students 

$153 per semester hour for Lifelong Education students in 
on campus courses 

$1 53 per semester hour for Weekend College students 
$114 per semester hour for Lifelong Education students in 
off campus courses 

SUMMER SCHOOL 1994 

Tuition $1 53 per semester hour 

Room $360 per summer term 

Board Contact Director of Summer Sessions for arrangements 

SPECIAL FEES 

Auditing a course $1 53.00 per semester hour 

Visiting a course (no College record kept) 80.00 per semester hour 

Music Lessons (50 minutes per week for semester) 200.00 

Music Lessons (25 minutes per week for semester) 1 00.00 

Challenge Examinations 80.00 

Semester Hours Earned by Challenge Exam 80.00 per semester hour 

Late Registration Fee 25.00 

Note: 

Fees are subject to change. 

One copy of a transcript will be furnished to each student upon request. Additional transcripts will be supplied for a fee of $2. No 
transcript will be issued and no degree will be granted to any student with an outstanding financial obligation to the College. 
There is a special charge for students with an excessive number of electrical connections in dormitory rooms. 



Financial Information / 13 



TERMS OF PAYMENT 

In general, all accounts for each term are due and payable in full at the time of final 
registration. The College does offer extended payment plan options for students who 
qualify and are unable to make full payment on their accounts at the start of a given 
term. A general description of these options is given below. For more detailed informa- 
tion regarding eligibility and application procedures contact the College Business 
Office at 399-6333. 

PAYMENT PLAN OPTIONS 

Academic Management Services, Inc. (AMS) - The AMS plan is an externally 
administered program in which educational expenses for a given academic year may 
be paid in equal monthly installments for a one time fee of $50 per school year. The 
number of installments allowed will vary according to the date of enrollment in the plan. 

The Barton College Plan (BCP) - The BCP is an internally administered program of 
Barton College. It allows students to make equal monthly installment payments on 
their accounts directly to the College in a given term. All accounts, however, must be 
paid in full by the end of each term. Interest, at the rate of prime plus 2%, will be 
charged on the amount of the unpaid balance at each due date. 

REFUNDS 

Voluntary Withdrawals and Semester Hour Reductions: The following refund poli- 
cies apply to students who withdraw from school or drop courses in a term. 

1. Regular Terms: Students who withdraw from school in any regular semester, fol- 
lowing the official class starting date will be given tuition refunds as follows: 

TUITION: 



First week 


100% 


Second week 


75% 


Third week 


50% 


Fourth week 


25% 


Fifth and subsequent weeks 


None 



Room: Room charges will be pro-rated on the same basis and schedule as tuition 
charges. 

Board: Meal charges will be pro-rated and refunds made on the basis of the number 
of weeks involved. 

Other Fees: No refunds will be made for any other charges or fees. 

Course Drops: Students who drop courses in the first four weeks of the official DROP 
period beginning with the official class starting date, will be refunded a part of only the 
tuition for the hours dropped if the student's total hour load is fewer than 12 hours or if 
the drop reduces the load to fewer than 12 hours. No refund will be made for other 
charges or fees. Refunds for tuition will be made as follows: 



First week 


100% 


Second week 


75% 


Third week 


50% 


Fourth week 


25% 


Fifth and subsequent weeks 


None 



2. Summer Terms: Students who withdraw from summer sessions will be charged at 
the rate of 10% per instructional day. Students who reduce their summer term load 
through officially dropping a course during the DROP/ADD period will be refunded 



14 / Financial Aid 

tuition for the hours dropped. After the end of the DROP/ADD period tuition will accrue 
at the rate of 10% per day beginning with 40%. After 10 days of any summer term, no 
refunds will be made except under circumstances outlined above. 

3. Weekend College: Students who drop a class(es) after the first class meeting but 
before the end of the first weekend of classes may do so without penalty. Drops that 
occur after 1 :30 p.m. on the first Sunday but before the second class meeting will result 
in the student being charged for 25% of the tuition and a refund of up to 75% for the 
class(es) for which the student is registered. Withdrawals or drops after the second 
class meeting but before the third will result in a 50% tuition charge with a 50% refund. 
Students withdrawing or dropping after the third class meeting will receive no refund 
and payment of 100% of the tuition charges will be due immediately. Withdrawals or 
drops must be made on the appropriate form obtained from the registrar or the Office of 
Lifelong Education and must have the appropriate signatures before being considered 
final. Students who meet their first class(es) and withdraw from the College will be 
assessed a 25% administrative fee. 

Medical Withdrawals: Students who, for medical conditions verified by a physician's 
written statement, withdraw from school may, upon request, receive a proration of 
tuition and other fees, as appropriate and as determined by the College, for the remain- 
der of the school term. 

Involuntary Administrative Withdrawals: Students who are withdrawn, suspended, 
or expelled from school for administrative reasons will receive no refund or credit for 
any tuition or fees paid except meal charges. Meal charges will be refunded as 
described in the general refund policy. 

Administrative withdrawals include those initiated by the College for disciplinary rea- 
sons, failure to attend class, failure to meet payment obligations, and/or other situations 
in which the student has not lived up to the terms of his/her contract with the College. 



FINANCIAL AID 

Some amount of financial aid is often necessary for a majority of the students to meet 
the rising cost of a college education. During the 1992-1993 academic year more than 
80 percent of the College student body received financial aid totaling over $6 million. 
The Office of Financial Aid and the Admissions and Financial Aid Committee attempt to 
identify students in need of financial aid and arrange loans, grants, scholarships, and/or 
part-time employment for them. 

Applications for aid are available from the Office of Financial Aid. A student seeking aid 
must complete the free application for Federal student aid and the Barton College B- 
Safe Form. 

Students are encouraged to apply early as some financial aid dollars are award- 
ed on a first-come, first-served basis. Additionally, many endowed scholarships are 
awarded according to preferences established by donors. If no candidates meeting first 
preference criteria have applied by March 15 of the year the scholarship is to be award- 
ed, the scholarship may be awarded to candidates meeting second or third preference 
eligibility. 

Federal regulations require any student receiving financial aid to maintain satisfactory 
progress towards graduation. This requirement includes the following considerations: 

(1) A full-time student must satisfactorily pass a minimum average of 12 semester 
hours credit per semester or 24 semester hours of credit per academic year. 
Summer sessions may be counted in the academic year. 

(2) A part-time student (taking 1 to 1 1 semester hours) must pass the appropriate 



Financial Aid / 15 



fraction of hours to maintain satisfactory progress. 

(3) The maximum time a full-time student may receive financial aid is 10 semesters (5 
years). 

(4) A student must earn and maintain at least a 2.00 grade point average by the end 
of the second academic year (fourth semester of enrollment). 

A student not maintaining satisfactory progress toward graduation is not eligible for fur- 
ther financial assistance until the minimum grade point average is achieved. A student 
may appeal to the Director of Financial Aid if extenuating circumstances resulted in 
ineligibility for aid. 

LOAN FUNDS 

FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM: The College participates in the Perkins Loan 
Program, also called the National Direct Student Loan Program. Approximately 
$300,000 per year is available to loan to needy students. Students may borrow up to 
$9,000 during their four years of undergraduate studies. 

FEDERAL ROBERT T. STAFFORD STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM (SUBSIDIZED AND 
UNSUBSIDIZED) - A student may borrow up to $2625 the first year of enrollment, up 
to $3500 the second year, and up to $5500 per year starting the third academic year. 
Total loans outstanding may not exceed $22,625 for undergraduate students. 

SUBSIDIZED LOANS: The Federal Government pays the interest on the loan while 
the student is in school. 

UNSUBSIDIZED LOANS: Interest accrues while enrolled in school, but may be 
"capitalized." 

Any student enrolled at Barton College may apply through College Foundation, Inc., 
P.O. Box 12100, Raleigh, N.C. 27605-2100. 

JAMES E. AND MARY Z. BRYAN FOUNDATION STUDENT LOAN PLAN - Legal resi- 
dents of North Carolina enrolled full time in undergraduate programs may borrow up to 
$750 per semester or $500 per quarter for a total of $1 ,500 per school year for an 
aggregate of $6,000 through College Foundation, Inc. The interest rate is 1% during 
the in-school and grace periods and 6% during the repayment period. Apply through 
the institution's Financial Aid Office. 

NORTH CAROLINA STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM FOR HEALTH, SCIENCE, AND 
MATHEMATICS: This program was formerly known as the North Carolina Medical 
Student Loan Program and is operated as a Special Program Department of the N.C. 
State Education Assistance Authority. Eligibility: Legal residents of North Carolina 
accepted as full-time students in accredited associate, baccalaureate, master's or doc- 
toral programs leading to a degree are eligible for this program. Studies must be in 
Health (Allied Health, Health Sciences, Clinical Psychology, Medical Social Work), 
Mathematics Education, and Science (Agricultural Sciences, Renewable Natural 
Resources, Computer and Information Sciences, Engineering and Engineering Related 
Technologies, Life Sciences, Physical Sciences, Food Sciences and Human Nutrition, 
Dietetics/Human Nutritional Services). The North Carolina Student Loan Program for 
Health, Science, and Mathematics selects recipients according to major, academic 
capabilities, and financial need. Value: Maximum loans range from $2,500 to $7,500 a 
year depending on the degree level. Loans are renewable annually on satisfactory aca- 
demic progress. Loans must be supported by a promissory note with notarized signa- 
tures from recipient and two sureties. Application Procedure: Students should request 
information and applications between mid-January and April 30 from the North Carolina 
Student Loan Program for Health, Science, and Mathematics, P.O. Box 20549, 



16 /Financial Aid 



Raleigh, NC 27619-0549 (919/733-2164). Repayment: In-school interest rate is 4%. 
The out-of-school interest rate ranges from 9% to 15%, depending upon the circum- 
stances of repayment. Cash repayment on an installment basis begins 180 days or 
less after completion of coursework or training. Under specified conditions, certain loan 
recipients in qualifying disciplines may have their loans canceled through practice ser- 
vice in North Carolina. 

PAUL DOUGLAS TEACHER SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM (PDTS): [Formerly Carl 
Perkins Scholarships and Congressional Teacher Scholarships] The Paul Douglas 
Teacher Scholarships were named for the late Illinois Senator Paul Douglas who 
served in the United States Senate from 1948-1966. The U.S. Congress authorized the 
program of scholarships in 1985 and funded it under the Budget Reconciliation Act of 
1986. The program in this State is administered by the North Carolina State Education 
Assistance Authority. Eligibility: Recipient must be a United States citizen admitted to 
enrol! or enrolled in an eligible institution of higher education located in North Carolina 
that offers a program of instruction leading to at least an associate degree. Student 
must have ranked in top 10% of the high school graduating class and have a cumula- 
tive GPA of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale. An outstanding record of leadership and service in 
extracurricular activities is a prerequisite. Student must express an interest in becoming 
a teacher at the pre-school, elementary, or secondary level especially in North 
Carolina. Value: Between 50 and 60 recipients are chosen annually. Awards are valued 
at up to $5,000 per year, but may not exceed the cost of education and must be 
reduced if financial aid under Title IV exceeds the cost of education. Subject to 
Congressional appropriations, the awards may be renewed, provided the recipient con- 
tinues to meet the requirements of the scholarship. Application Procedure: Applications 
may be obtained in January of each year from guidance counselors of public or private 
high schools in North Carolina and from the deans of education or financial aid officers 
at public or private postsecondary institutions in North Carolina. The annual application 
deadline is April 15. Recipients must sign and enter into a Promissory Note and 
Scholarship Agreement. Teaching Obligation: Scholarship recipients are generally 
required to teach at the preschool, elementary or secondary level for two years for 
each year of scholarship assistance they receive. Recipients who teach in designated 
teacher shortage areas are obligated to teach one year for each year of scholarship 
assistance. Recipients who do not fulfill the teaching obligation are required to repay on 
a prorata basis the amount of the scholarships received as well as the accrued interest 
at a substantial rate (10.45% in 1988-1989). 

FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL LOANS FOR STUDENTS (SLS): These loans to students 
are a second part of the North Carolina Insured Student Loan Program and were for- 
merly referred to as ALAS Loans or PLUS Loans to students. Principally available 
through a central lender, College Foundation, Inc., these loans are for undergraduate 
independent students or graduate/professional students who need to supplement any 
Stafford Loans and other resources available for their enrollment in postsecondary 
institutions. SLS borrowers must have a good credit record and do not have to demon- 
strate "financial need;" however, they must have received a determination of eligibility 
(or ineligibility) for both the need-based Stafford Loan and Pell Grant (Pell Grants are 
applicable only to undergraduate students). Eligibility: The student must be a United 
States citizen, national or permanent resident alien who is also a North Carolina resi- 
dent attending an eligible in-state or out-of-state institution. An out-of-state resident 
attending a North Carolina eligible institution at least half time is also eligible to apply. 
Programs of study must lead to a degree or certification. Students who- demonstrate eli- 
gibility for a Stafford Loan must have applied for the Stafford Loan before applying for 
the SLS; they must also have received a determination of eligibility or ineligibility for 
Pell Grants. Value: Undergraduate independent, graduate and professional students 
may borrow up to $4,000 for an aggregate amount of $20,000. Interest Rate and 
Repayment Terms: The interest rate is a variable rate set annually for the 12-month 



Financial Aid / 17 



period July 1-June 30 not to exceed 11%. Repayment period begins when the loan is 
disbursed and repayments must begin within 60 days following the disbursement of 
final installment of the loan proceeds. The length of the repayment period depends on 
the total amount borrowed but normally does not exceed 10 years. Borrowers can 
obtain a combined payment covering multiple loans. Students may request deferment 
of payments on loan principal while enrolled for a sufficient academic workload; howev- 
er, interest must be paid at least quarterly during deferment unless borrower chooses 
to authorize the lender to add accrued interest to the loan principal (this is called capi- 
talization). Capitalization will cost borrowers more in interest charges over the life of the 
loan but does provide an alternative if they are unable to pay the interest periodically 
during their enrollment. Application Procedures: Before applying for an SLS, students 
must first have received a determination of eligibility or ineligibility for both Pell Grants 
and Stafford Loans and, if eligible, must have applied for the interest-subsidized 
Stafford Loan. Information and application forms for SLS are available from College 
Foundation, Inc., P.O. Box 12100, Raleigh, NC 27605 (919/821-4771), or from any col- 
lege (or vocational school) in North Carolina. College Foundation will notify you and 
your college of the loan decision. 

FEDERAL PLUS LOANS TO PARENTS: These loans to parents are the third part of 
the North Carolina Insured Student Loan Program. Principally available through a cen- 
tral lender, College Foundation, Inc., these loans are available to parents of dependent 
students enrolled in either undergraduate or graduate programs of study. Parent bor- 
rowers must have a satisfactory credit record and must show the ability to meet the 
monthly payments on the educational loan. Parent borrowers must complete a 
Financial Aid application. Eligibility: The borrower and the benefiting student must be a 
United States citizen, national, or permanent resident alien. The student must be a 
North Carolina resident or a non-resident attending a North Carolina eligible institution. 
The student must be enrolled at least half time in a degree or certificate program in an 
eligible college or vocational school. Value: A parent of a dependent student may bor- 
row up to the difference in cost of attendance and other student financial aid per year 
for each son or daughter. Interest Rate and Repayment Terms: The interest rate is a 
variable rate set annually for the 12 month period July 1-June 30 not to exceed 12%. 
Repayment period begins when the loan is disbursed and repayments begin within 60 
days. The length of the repayment period depends on the total amount borrowed but 
normally does not exceed 10 years. Parent borrowers can obtain a combined payment 
covering multiple loans and, under certain conditions set by Federal law, can defer pay- 
ments. Application Procedures: Parents are advised to determine first if the student will 
qualify for an interest-subsidized Stafford Loan. (To apply for the Stafford Loan, the stu- 
dent must complete and file the family financial statement - FAF or FFS - so that the 
student's college or vocational school can evaluate eligibility for Pell Grant as well as 
the Stafford Loan.) Request PLUS applications and information from College 
Foundation, Inc., P.O. Box 12100, Raleigh, NC 27605 (919/821-4771), the high school 
guidance office, or from the North Carolina school the student plans to attend. College 
Foundation, Inc. notifies applicants of approval of loans. 

NORTH CAROLINA SCHOLARSHIP LOAN FUND FOR PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS: 
This scholarship was established by act of the General Assembly of North Carolina in 
1957 for students preparing to teach in the public schools of North Carolina. Students 
with good high school or college records may be eligible for a loan for each of four 
years. Students must be planning to teach in a priority area. One annual loan is auto- 
matically canceled for each year that the recipients teaches in the public schools of 
North Carolina or on a U.S. Government military reservation. Eligibility: Any resident of 
North Carolina who is interested in preparing to teach in the public schools of the State 
is eligible to apply. The criteria for awarding scholarship loans are measures of academ- 
ic performance, including grade point average, scores on standardized tests, class rank 
and recommendations of guidance counselors. An equal number of scholarship loans 



1 8 / Financial Aid 



are awarded in each of the state's eleven congressional districts. Financial need is not 
a selection criterion. Value: Students may receive a maximum of $2,000 per academic 
year when enrolled in a full-time teacher education program. The loan is renewable for 
a period of four years. Application Procedure: applicants should contact the institution's 
Financial Aid Office for an application. Applications must be returned to Scholarship 
Loan Section, State Department of Public Instruction, 116 W. Edenton Street, Raleigh, 
NC 27603-1712 (919-733-0701) by March 1 of each year. Repayment: Loans bear an 
interest rate of 6%. Recipients must execute a promissory note provided by the State 
Board of Education. Recipients can repay the loan by teaching for a certain period of 
time in a North Carolina public school or on a U.S. Government military reservation. 

ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM (formerly the Federal Merit 
Scholarship Program): This is a Federally-funded program established to promote stu- 
dent excellence and achievement and to recognize exceptionally able students who 
show promise of continued excellence. Eligibility: Recipient must be a graduate of a 
public or private secondary school in North Carolina or have the equivalent of a certifi- 
cate of graduation and be accepted for enrollment at an institution of higher education. 
Byrd Scholars are selected on the basis of demonstrated outstanding academic 
achievement and promise of continued academic excellence. Financial need is not a 
selection criterion. Value: Ten entering college freshmen from each North Carolina 
congressional district are chosen annually. The amount of the non-renewable award is 
$1,500. Application Procedure: Applications are available from public and non-public 
secondary schools in North Carolina. Recipients are chosen by regional selection com- 
mittees and are notified of their selection prior to the end of the academic school year. 
For additional information, contact the Division of Teacher Education, NC Department 
of Public Instruction, 116 W. Edenton Street, Raleigh, NC 27603-1712 (919/733-0701). 

NORTH CAROLINA VETERANS SCHOLARSHIP Eligibility: Award is available to chil- 
dren of deceased or disabled veterans or of veterans who were listed as POW/MIA. 
Veteran must have been a legal resident of North Carolina at time of entry into service, 
or child must have been born in North Carolina and resided there continuously. Value: 
Full scholarships provide for four academic years of free tuition, room and board allow- 
ances and mandatory fees at state-supported institutions. Limited scholarships provide 
free tuition and mandatory fees. The yearly value at private institutions is $3,000 (full) 
and $1 ,200 (limited). Awards may be used for either undergraduate or graduate study. 
Application Procedure: For information concerning this scholarship, contact the North 
Carolina Division of Veterans Affairs, 227 E. Edenton Street, Raleigh, NC 27601 
(919/733-3851). The Division of Veterans Affairs notifies applicants of approval of ben- 
efits. 

VETERANS EDUCATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (VEAP): Under the Veterans 
Education Assistance Program, members of the military voluntarily contribute between 
$25 and $100 to a savings fund. The Veterans Administration matches the savings 
fund with $1 for every $1 contributed by the military person. Each of the four branches 
of the service operates its own voluntary education program. For more information 
about financial assistance available to members of the armed forces, contact the 
appropriate branch of service listed below: 

Air Force Marines 

3537th USAF Recruiting Squadrom Marine Recruiting Station 
Post Office Box 566 Federal Building 

Shaw AFB, SC 291 52 300 Lafayette Street Mall 

(1 -800-423-USAF) Raleigh, NC 27602 

(1-800-662-7312) 



Financial Aid / 19 



Army Navy 

Army Recruiting Command Navy Recruiting District 

Suite 218 1001 Navaho Drive 

31 1 7 Poplarwood Court Raleigh, NC 27609 

Raleigh, NC 27625 (1-800-662-7568) 

(1-800-662-7473) 

OTHER AVAILABLE LOAN FUNDS 

Other sources of available funds have been made possible by the following people and 
organizations: A.W. Ange Loan Fund; George S. Andrews Loan Fund; Victoria Louise 
Bazemore Memorial Fund; Eloise Bowman Memorial Loan Fund; First Christian Church 
of Williamston; First Christian Church of Wilmington; Greenville Christian Endeavor 
Loan Fund; Marina R. Hardison Honorary Loan Fund; Masonic Loan Fund; Masonic 
Theater of New Bern; North Carolina Loan Fund; Mill Creek Christian Men's Loan 
Fund; Mill Creek District Christian Women's Fellowship; James I. Miller Student Aid 
Fund; Jimmy Millhouse Loan Fund; Pamlico District Loan Fund; Rocky Mount Christian 
Church Fund; Essie and Leon Roebuck Fund; Southeastern District Loan Fund; Mr. 
and Mrs. T. M. Stanback Loan Fund; Nancy L. Sutton Loan Fund; and Lydia H. Thorne 
Loan Fund. 

GRANTS 

FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTARY EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS - A limited 
number of educational opportunity grants are available to students attending the 
College. Funds for the grants are provided by the federal government and must be 
matched by an equal amount of some other type aid. Grants under this program can be 
awarded to students who: (1) are nationals of the United States; (2) have been accept- 
ed for enrollment as full-time students, or who are in good standing and are in full-time 
attendance; (3) show evidence of academic or creative promise and capability of main- 
taining good standing in their course of study; (4) are of exceptional financial need; and 
(5) would not be financially able to attend the College without such a grant. Grants 
under this program vary from $200 to a maximum of $4,000 per year depending upon 
funds available and the need of students concerned. 

GRANTS TO RESIDENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA: North Carolina students who can 
demonstrate need are eligible to apply for special grants from funds appropriated by 
the North Carolina General Assembly and awarded through the Student Financial Aid 
Office of the College. The amount of aid for which a student qualifies is determined by 
the degree of need as indicated by the needs analysis and the availability of such 
funds. Application must be made through the Director of Student Financial Aid. 

FEDERAL PELL GRANTS: A grant to students based on the expected family contribu- 
tion and the availability of funds appropriated by Congress. The concept of this grant 
program is one of "entitlement" giving all students on a nationwide basis the same 
opportunity to share in the total federal allocation for this program. The applications for 
these grants are available from high school guidance offices and the Financial Aid 
Office at the College. All students applying for financial aid are required to apply for a 
Pell Grant. Grants may range up to $2,300. 

NORTH CAROLINA LEGISLATIVE TUITION GRANTS: The General Assembly of 
North Carolina appropriates funds to award to each full-time student who is a legal resi- 
dent of the State of North Carolina. The award amount is established annually by the 
General Assembly. One-half of the award is available each semester. 

NORTH CAROLINA STUDENT INCENTIVE GRANT (NCSIG) - This program is offered 
by the North Carolina State Education Assistance Authority through College 
Foundation, Inc. Eligibility: Applicant must 1) be a U.S. citizen, 2) be a North Carolina 



20 / Financial Aid 

resident, 3) be enrolled or accepted for enrollment on a full-time basis at a North 
Carolina postsecondary institution, 4) not be enrolled in a program designed primarily 
for career preparation in a religious vocation, and 5) maintain satisfactory academic 
progress. Award is available to undergraduates who demonstrate "substantial financial 
need." Value: Awards range from $200 to $1,500 per year, under the North Carolina 
program depending on financial need. The average NCSIG award is approximately 
$750. Application Procedure: Student must apply for the Pell Grant when he/she files 
the Financial Aid Form (FAF) of the College Scholarship Service or the Family 
Financial Statement (FFS) of the American College Testing Program. Application for an 
NCSIG award is made by simply checking the appropriate section on the FAF or FFS 
and instructing that a copy of the analysis be sent to the N.C. Student Incentive Grant 
Program. The deadline for applying is March 15 of each year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The administration of the scholarships is subject to the following rules: 

(1) A student seeking scholarship aid must file a complete application for financial 
assistance and a need analysis form with the Office of Financial Aid. An eligible 
student may receive more than one scholarship if qualified. A student receiving 
more than one scholarship must have the approval of the Admissions and 
Financial Aid Committee. 

(2) A student enrolled in fewer than 12 semester hours may apply for a partial scholar- 
ship, to be prorated on the number of hours taken. 

(3) Scholarships for the summer session are restricted to the following categories: for- 
eign student scholarships; scholarships for families of full-time faculty and staff; 
Religion scholarships; Honor Scholarships (must have the approval of the 
Admissions and Financial Aid Committee). 

Tuition Scholarships in Specified Areas 

HONOR SCHOLARSHIPS IN MUSIC are available to incoming freshmen, transfer stu- 
dents, and continuing students who are music majors. Stipends range from $500 to 
$2,000 for the academic year. Information is available from the Chair of the Department 
of Communication, Performing and Visual Arts. 

MAJOR LESSONS SCHOLARSHIPS are available each semester to cover the cost of 
Major Lessons. These are available to students majoring or minoring in music. 

RELIGION SCHOLARSHIPS: 

(1) A student who is either an unmarried dependent child under 23 years of age or a 
spouse of a minister in active service is eligible for a tuition scholarship amounting 
to 20 percent of tuition, if the student demonstrates financial need. 

(2) A student who is an unmarried dependent child under 23 years of age of a mem- 
ber of the professional staff of the Division of Higher Education of the Christian 
Church is eligible for the same tuition remission offered to dependents of the facul- 
ty and staff of the College. 

(3) Students who engage in the study of religion are eligible for a number of endowed 
and institutional scholarships available in this field. Inquiries and applications 
should be directed to the Chairman of the Department of Religion and Philosophy, 
c/o Barton College, Wilson, NC 27893. 

ATHLETIC GRANTS-IN-AID: A limited number of athletic grants-in-aid are offered in 
baseball, basketball, golf, soccer, softball, tennis, and volleyball. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS: The College provides an amount equaling four full scholar- 
ships annually to foreign students. The scholarships are awarded upon recommenda- 
tion of the foreign student advisor. 



Financial Aid/ 21 

UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM 

A stipend award of up to $16,000 ($4,000 each year) during the four years of under- 
graduate studies at the College is open to high school graduates with demonstrated 
leadership ability and an excellent academic record. 

To be eligible to apply, a candidate must rank in the upper quarter of the high school 
class; must have SAT scores of 1 ,100 or more; must possess demonstrated leadership 
ability; must have been accepted at the College; and must be interviewed personally. 
The Fellow must maintain a 3.25 grade point average and be an active participant in 
the program in order to receive the stipend each year. 

Annually, these awards are given to the Fellow upon the recommendation of the 
Undergraduate Fellowship Review Panel to the President of the College. 

Application for this Fellowship must be made by April 15. 

THE SARAH AND MILTON ADAMS UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: This 
Fellowship was established by family and friends of Sarah and Milton Adams, gradu- 
ates and longstanding members of the College community and Wilson, North Carolina. 

THE JAMES F. AND HANNAH R. BAGWELL UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Bagwell of Washington, North Carolina, made this 
Undergraduate Fellowship possible in honor of their parents. 

THE CLASS OF 1936 UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: This Undergraduate 
Fellowship was made possible with funding by a graduate of the Class of 1936. 

THE S. M. COZART UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: The family of S. M. Cozart 
has established this Undergraduate Fellowship in honor of S. M. Cozart, a long-time 
member of the Board of Trustees of the College. 

THE JOSEPHUS DANIELS FOUNDATION UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: This 
Undergraduate Fellowship has been established by a grant from the Josephus Daniels 
Charitable Foundation, funded by the News and Observer Publishing Company. 
Preference is given to the student with a desire to teach in the public schools of North 
Carolina. 

THE S. GRADY AND LOUISE DEANS UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: Through 
the generosity of Louise Deans of Wilson, North Carolina, an Undergraduate 
Fellowship has been established. This fellowship is named for her late husband and 
herself. 

THE JOHN GRAVES II MEMORIAL UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: Mr. and Mrs. 
Tom W. Graves of Wilson, North Carolina, have established this Undergraduate 
Fellowship in memory of their son, John Graves II. 

THE THOMAS J. HACKNEY, JR. UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: This Fellowship 
was created through funds from the Flame of Truth Award given in honor of Mr. 
Thomas J. Hackney, Jr., former Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the College. 

THE THOMAS J. HACKNEY, SR. UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: Through her 
estate, Mrs. Evelyn J. Hackney provided for this Undergraduate Fellowship to be estab- 
lished in memory of her husband, Mr. Thomas J. Hackney, Sr., former Chairman of the 
Board of Trustees of the College. 

THE PEGGY AND STEVE HICKS UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: Through his 
will, Mr. Steve Hicks of Rocky Mount, North Carolina, provided for an Undergraduate 
Fellowship to be granted in memory of his wife, Peggy, and himself. He also provided 
for additional funding for financial assistance in underwriting the total Undergraduate 
Fellowship Program at the College. 

THE CLARENCE H. MOYE UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: With funds from the 



22 / Financial Aid 

Clarence H. Moye estate and from Mrs. Clarence H. Moye, this Undergraduate 
Fellowship was established by Mrs. Moye in memory of her husband. 

THE JOSEPH BRYAN AND JANE WILSON O'NEAL UNDERGRADUATE FELLOW- 
SHIP: Through her will Dr. Ruth O'Neal of Winston-Salem, North Carolina provided for 
the establishment of an Undergraduate Fellowship in memory of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph Bryan O'Neal. Preference for this Fellowship will be given to a Fellow who 
is pursuing a career in science or science-related fields. 

THE ISABEL D. PETERSON UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: Mrs. Isabel D. 
Peterson of Charlotte, North Carolina, funded this Undergraduate Fellowship in memo- 
ry of her husband, Mr. M. W. "Pete" Peterson. First preference for this Fellowship will 
be given to qualified students from the First Christian Church of Charlotte. Qualified 
students from the Eastway Christian Church of Charlotte receive second preference. 
Thereafter, the Fellowship is available to any student who meets the qualifications. 

THE W. R. AND ROSA W. ROBERSON UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: The 
grandchildren of Mr. and Mrs. Roberson established this Undergraduate Fellowship in 
memory of their grandfather, W. R. Roberson, and in honor of their grandmother, Rosa 
W. Roberson. Preference for this Fellowship will be given to a Fellow who intends to 
pursue a career in either the Christian ministry or in a church vocation. 

THE CLYDE STOKES UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP: This Undergraduate 
Fellowship was established through the estate of Miss Clyde Stokes of Ayden, N.C., 
and a long-time educator in Pitt County Schools. 

HONOR SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

HIGH HONORS SCHOLARSHIP 25% OF TUITION — A student must graduate in the 
top five percent of the high school graduating class or have a high school grade point 
average of 3.40 and at least 1 ,000 on the SAT. A 3.00 grade point average must be 
maintained at the College in order to receive the scholarship for sophomore, junior, and 
senior years. A limited number of scholarships are available. 

HONORS SCHOLARSHIP 20% OF TUITION — A student must graduate in the top ten 
percent of the high school graduating class or have a high school grade point average 
of 3.20 and at least 900 on the SAT. A 3.00 grade point average must be maintained at 
the College in order to receive the scholarship for sophomore, junior, and senior years. 
A limited number of scholarships are available. 

LEADERSHIP/ACTIVITIES SCHOLARSHIP 15% OF TUITION — A student must have 
a high school grade point average of 2.50 and at least 820 on the SAT. A high school 
counselor or teacher must verify the student's leadership ability. A 2.50 grade point 
average must be maintained at the College in order to receive the scholarship for 
sophomore, junior, and senior years. A limited number of scholarships are available. 

THE CALDWELL SCHOLARSHIPS (25% of tuition) - Students who began their college 
careers at the College or transferred with seven hours or less, and have maintained 
their full-time enrollment status are eligible to receive the Caldwell Scholarship. 
Designed to award academic excellence, in order to receive this award, a student must 
have completed at least 27 semester hours, and have earned a minimum 3.25 cumula- 
tive GPA. Thereafter, the scholarship is renewable based on maintaining a minimum 
3.00 GPA. Students who receive any other source of institutional academic scholarship 
(Honors, High Honor, Undergraduate Fellowship, etc.) are not eligible for this award. 
Once the scholarship has been granted, students must maintain their continuous full- 
time enrollment status at the College in order to remain eligible for renewal. If a student 
drops to part-time or withdraws from the institution, the scholarship is forfeited and can- 
not be reinstated. Exceptions to this rule can be made only by the Admissions and 
Financial Aid Committee upon review of official documentation and only in the case of 



Financial Aid / 23 



a medical withdrawal. Students who are attending the College by virtue of Faculty/Staff 
Tuition Waiver or Tuition Exchange Agreements with other institutions are not eligible 
for this scholarship. 

TRANSFER HONORS SCHOLARSHIP $1,000 — A student who has attempted at 
least 27 semester hours must have earned at least a 3.25 grade point average. A stu- 
dent entering the College with less that 27 semester hours must meet the following cri- 
teria: graduation in the top three percent of the high school class or a high school grade 
point average of 3.40 and at least 1 ,000 on the SAT. A 3.00 grade point average must 
be maintained at the College in order to receive the scholarship for each subsequent 
year. A limited number of scholarships are available. The Honors Scholarships at the 
College are designed to award academic excellence and leadership potential. In order 
to receive one of these scholarships a student must maintain full-time enrollment status 
as well as the specified grade point average. Seniors who receive the scholarship and 
choose to carry a part-time course load during their final semester prior to graduation, 
will be awarded these funds on a pro-rata basis. 

ANNUALLY FUNDED OR ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS 

GEORGE H. ADAMS MEMORIAL ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: The George H. Adams 
Memorial Endowed Scholarship was established through a bequest from the estate of 
Mr. Adams, a long time member of the Board of Trustees of the College. The scholar- 
ship is to be awarded annually to a presently enrolled or entering student at the College 
with first preference given to a resident of Wilson County, North Carolina, and second 
preference to a resident of the state of North Carolina. The recipient is to be chosen by 
the Financial Aid Office in consultation with the Admissions Office. 

THE W. D. ADAMS FUND: This endowed scholarship was established through the 
bequest of the late W. D. Adams, Sr., of Wilson, N.C., available to worthy young people 
desiring to study for the Christian ministry. 

ALPHA CHI HONOR SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship established by the Alpha Chi 
Honor Fraternity of the College is to be awarded to a member of the organization who 
has shown scholarship ability, has need, and is of good character. The scholarship 
must be used at the College. 

JACKIE LEE AMMONS MEMORIAL ASSISTANCE FUND: This fund was established 
January 1980 by Mr. and Mrs. William Ammons. The interest earned on the endow- 
ment principal is to be used at the discretion of the Department of Religion and 
Philosophy faculty for assistance to qualifying students. 

THE ANDREWS SCHOLARSHIP FUND: This fund has been established by Robert V. 
Andrews and William C. Andrews of Consolidated Planning, Incorporated. This scholar- 
ship is awarded annually to a Business Programs major upon recommendation of the 
Business Programs faculty. Evaluation criteria include scholarship, leadership in club 
activities, service and contribution to the college community, and interest and future 
promise in his or her chosen major or track. 

THE HUGH ANGE MEMORIAL FUND: This trust fund was established through the 
estate of A. W. Ange, the income from which is available for scholarships for worthy 
students studying for the ministry. 

ART FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP: The Department of Communication, Performing and 
Visual Arts faculty established this scholarship fund to assist art students. This fund is 
usually awarded to help offset the cost of art supplies. Number and amount of awards 
are based upon funds available and qualified students available. 

NATIONAL SCHOLASTIC ART AWARD SCHOLARSHIP: A scholarship is presented 
to a winning student in the National Scholastic Art Award Program. Scholarships are 



24 / Financial Aid 



also presented to selected recipients of the Gold Key Award in the District competition 
at the College. The recipient must enroll as a full-time student at the College and main- 
tain a minimum grade point average of 3.00. 

DR. JOHN BARCLAY SCHOLARSHIP FUND: This fund was established in honor of 
Dr. John Barclay by Mrs. Katharyn Newsome Truesdale. This is an endowed scholar- 
ship for students preparing for the Christian ministry. Recipients will be selected by the 
Department of Religion and Philosophy faculty during the spring semester for awarding 
in the following fall semester. 

THE ROY BRANCH AND ALMA ABERNATHY BARHAM SCHOLARSHIP: Mrs. Alma 
Abernathy Barham, a 1933 graduate of Barton College, has established this endowed 
scholarship in memory of her husband, Roy, a 1939 graduate of Barton. The scholar- 
ship is awarded annually to a student interested in a vocation related to providing ser- 
vice or special care to those of our society who are less fortunate. The recipient for this 
scholarship is chosen by the faculty of the History, Social Sciences, and Social Work. 

THE H. LEMAN AND MARIE S. BARNHILL SCHOLARSHIPS: Through the generosity 
of Mr. and Mrs. Barnhill of Williamston, North Carolina, four identical endowed scholar- 
ships have been funded. The purpose of the scholarships is to provide an equivalent 
annual amount of the cost of tuition, mandatory fees, and room and board to a student 
with a demonstrated financial need and academic potential. The scholarships are des- 
ignated to be in the form of a four year scholarship with the renewal each year depend- 
ing on the student being academically eligible to return to the College having made sat- 
isfactory progress as defined by the Financial Aid Office. First preference is to be given 
to a student from the First Christian Church of Williamston. A student from Williamston 
High School is to receive second preference. Third preference goes to a Martin County 
resident. The selection of the recipient is to be made by the President of the College in 
consultation with proper officials from the Financial Aid Office and the Admissions 
Office. Mr. Barnhill is a 1927 Barton College graduate under the former name of 
Atlantic Christian College and has been a long-time member of the Board of Trustees. 

THE "BUSTER" AND "KITTY" BELL SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship has been estab- 
lished by Kenneth Hill Brinson '59 and his wife, Elizabeth Bell Brinson '62, in honor of 
Mrs. Brinson's parents, Henry Floyd Bell, Jr. '33 and Kathleen Roberson Bell '35. It is 
designed to reward students of above average academic ability who demonstrate 
financial need and would otherwise be unable to attend the College. To be eligible for 
the scholarship a student must earn above a 2.50 GPA. 

THE W. I. AND RAYE DAWSON BISSETTE FUND: Mr. and Mrs. Henry Stilley Bonner 
of Miami, Fla. established this endowed scholarship. 

THE KENNETH BLOUNT BOWEN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: The Kenneth Blount 
Bowen Endowed Scholarship was established in memory of Dr. Kenneth Bowen by his 
daughters Betsy B. Hobgood and Brenda B. Hamilton and their families. The annual 
earnings are to be awarded to a student of the College who is a member of the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and preparing for the christian ministry. 

THE BERTHA R. BREWER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND: This fund was estab- 
lished by Ernest Brewer in memory of his wife. The scholarship primarily is to be made 
available to students engaged in Liberal Arts studies with first preference being given to 
students in the area of the Department of History, Social Sciences and Social Work. 

THE ERNEST BREWER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND: This- fund was created 
by the estate of Mr. Brewer. The fund is for members of Intercollegiate Athletics teams. 

THE ELIZABETH FAYE BRINSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP: Mr. and Mrs. Jack D. 
Brinson of Arapahoe, N.C., established this endowed scholarship in memory of their 
daughter, Elizabeth Faye. It is available to young people preparing for full-time church 
vocations. 



Financial Aid / 25 



THE LUCILLE AND HADLEY BRYAN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: This endowed 
scholarship was established in 1987 by North State Motor Lines, Inc. and the company 
president, Mr. Donald T. Bryan. The scholarship is in honor of Mr. Bryan's mother and 
in memory of his father, Lucille and Hadley Bryan. A grant of $500 is to be given annu- 
ally beginning in the Fall of 1988, to an entering freshman of the College who has 
demonstrated financial need. The interest earned on the principal will provide the annu- 
al grant. The selection of the recipient of the Bryan Scholarship will be made by the 
Director of Financial Aid in concert with the Office of Admissions. 

THE LELA BARNHILL BUNTING ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: Mrs. Lela Bamhill 
Bunting has provided the funds to establish this scholarship in memory of her mother 
and father, Mr. and Mrs. Julius Thomas Bamhill, her husband, Mr. Rufus Vernon 
Bunting, and Mrs. Edna Woods Barnhill, an alumna of the College, and in honor of Mr. 
Leman Barnhill and his wife, Marie. The award will be made annually to a student 
majoring in the Teacher Education Program. 

THE MARY ALICE AND HOWARD B. CHAPiN EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP: This 
endowed scholarship, established by North Carolina Representative and Mrs. Howard 
B. Chapin, provides $1,500 annually to a student who plans to teach in the North 
Carolina schools at any level from kindergarten to the twelfth grade. The recipient will 
be selected by representatives of the Teacher Education Committee, the Director of 
Financial Aid, and the Vice President for Student Life. 

THE LULA M. COAN SCHOLARSHIP: This is an open scholarship established by Mrs. 
Lula M. Coan of Winston-Salem, N.C., for ministerial students. 

JOHN AND CASSIE COWELL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP: This endowed scholar- 
ship, established by the family and friends of the late John W. Cowell, Bayboro, N.C., 
gives preference to applicants from Pamlico County. 

THE JERRY W. DAVIS MEMORIAL MUSIC AWARD: This is a cash award available 
each semester to a non-music major who, in the estimation of the music faculty, has 
contributed most to music ensembles. 

THE HAROLD AND VELMA DEITCH SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship has been 
established by the Red Oak Christian Church of Greenville, N.C., in honor of Reverend 
Harold Deitch and his wife, Velma. It is to be granted to a student of the College, who 
being a member of the Christian Church, is planning to enter any of the various phases 
of the Christian ministry. 

DELTA KAPPA GAMMA INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY - GAMMA MU CHAPTER 
SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship is awarded every two years to a senior, female, edu- 
cation major. Recipient must have a "B" or above average and a record of participating 
in co-curricular activities. 

DELTA KAPPA GAMMA INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY - OMICRON CHAPTER SCHOL- 
ARSHIP: This scholarship is awarded every two years to a female education major with 
an above average academic and extra-curricular record. 

THE JAMES EDWARD DENDY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND: This endowed 
scholarship was established by family and friends in memory of James Edward Dendy. 
Annual earnings from the endowed scholarship are to be awarded on the basis of 
financial need with first preference being given to a member of the Alpha Sigma Phi 
Fraternity or the Delta Zeta Sorority. 

THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) SCHOLARSHIP: The Division 
of Higher Education of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) offers scholarships to 
members of the Disciples Church attending the College. Applications, available through 
the Office of Financial Aid, are due by April 15 each year. 

rary 



26 / Financial Aid 



THE JERRY W. DIXON-McDONALD'S SCHOLARSHIP: This endowed scholarship, 
established by the Jerry W. Dixon family, is valued at $1 ,000 a year and is awarded 
each year to a Wilson County student planning to enter the field of nursing. 

THE E. MERLE AND OLLIE EDWARDS SCHOLARSHIP: This endowed scholarship, 
established in honor of E. Merle and Ollie Edwards of Kinston, was made possible 
through funds given by their sons, Tommy and Merle, Jr. Awarded annually, the schol- 
arship is available for employees and their families of the Edwards Group of compa- 
nies. 

THE LAURIE AND REID ELLIS ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: Mr. Laurie Ellis of 
Winterville, N.C. has provided the endowed funds to create a scholarship named for 
him and his wife, Reid. The recipient of the scholarship is to be a nursing student 
selected by the faculty of the Department of Nursing. 

THE LOTTIE ELLIS TUITION SCHOLARSHIP: This endowed scholarship results from 
a bequest Lottie Ellis of Winterville, N.C., made through her estate. This scholarship 
will be used to aid in funding tuition expenses of a nursing student. First preference is 
to be given to a pre-nursing student with second preference going to a pre-med stu- 
dent. The recipient will be selected by the Department of Nursing faculty in conjunction 
with the proper officials of the Financial Aid Office and the Admissions Office. 

THE JOSEPH NASSIF AND ESSIE ABEYOUNIS EL RAMEY MEMORIAL ENDOWED 
SCHOLARSHIP: This endowment was established in memory of Mr. and Mrs. El 
Ramey by family and friends. First preference will be given qualified students who are 
residents of Farmville, N.C. Second and third preferences will be students who are 
residents of Pitt County or of North Carolina, respectively. Selection will be based on 
academic performance, citizenship, community involvement and financial need. 

OLIN EDWARD FOX SCHOLARSHIP MEMORIAL FUND: This fund was established 
by Mrs. Fox in honor and memory of her late husband. The fund will be used to aid 
worthy students of the College who are studying for full-time Christian service through 
a full-time Christian vocation which contemplates, but is not limited to, the ministries of 
preaching, teaching, music and arts. 

THE TED C. FOY SCHOLARSHIP: This English scholarship was established by 
friends of the late Dr. Ted C. Foy. The award is to be given to an English major chosen 
by the Department of English, Modern Languages, and Communications. 

THE MARGARET FULGHUM SCHOLARSHIP FUND: Established by Mrs. Fulghum, 
the income of this fund is available to needy and deserving students. 

THE JOHN LEWIS AND LELIA HOTT GOFF ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP:The sons of 
Reverend and Mrs. Goff have established this endowed scholarship in memory of their 
parents. It is designated for a ministerial student or other student from the congregation 
of the First Christian Church of Williamston, North Carolina. Next preference is given to 
a student from Martin County and then to any qualified ministerial student of Barton 
College. 

THE GORDON STREET CHRISTIAN CHURCH MINISTERIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND: 
The congregation of Gordon Street Christian Church of Kinston has established this 
scholarship through the use of their Raymond M. Brown Memorial Fund. First prefer- 
ence is given to ministerial students from Gordon Street Christian Church. Second pref- 
erence is given to ministerial students from the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in 
N.C. Third preference will be determined by the College community administering 
scholarship assistance. 

THE RUTH PATTON GRADY ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: In the distribution of his 
estate Mr. James Calhoun Grady provided for the establishment of this endowed schol- 
arship in memory of his wife, Ruth. The scholarship is available for a minority high 
school student interested in majoring in elementary education. To be eligible the high 



Financial Aid / 27 



school senior must have an overall grade point average of 3.00 and minimum SAT 
scores of 900. The scholarship is renewable each year if the student maintains at least 
a 2.75 grade point average and continues as an elementary education major. 

THE HACKNEY BROTHERS BODY COMPANY SCHOLARSHIPS: These scholar- 
ships, funded by the Hackney Brothers Body Company endowment, are available for 
the spouses and children of full-time Hackney Brothers Body Company employees. In 
order to qualify for one of the scholarships, a student must have a minimum predicted 
grade point average of 2.00 on a 4.00 scale, and must maintain that average or better 
to retain the scholarship. Should there be no qualified applicant with the required 
Hackney affiliations, the College may consider other applicants who have at least a 
minimum predicted grade point average of 3.00. These recipients must maintain a 3.00 
grade point average or better in order to retain the scholarship. When fully funded, this 
endowment will provide four scholarships. 

THE HARPER FAMILY ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: This endowed scholarship is 
underwritten by members of the Harper family. The recipient is chosen on the basis of 
financial need by the Office of Financial Aid in consultation with the Office of 
Admissions. The scholarship is renewable if the student makes prescribed progress 
towards graduation. 

THE MILDRED E. HARTSOCK SCHOLARSHIP: This is an endowed scholarship 
established by friends of Dr. Mildred Hartsock, who for 33 years served as Chair of the 
Department of English at the College. Income from this scholarship is available to a 
deserving English major. The recipient of this award will be chosen by the Department 
of English, Modern Languages, and Communications. 

THE JAMES B. HEMBY, JR. SCHOLARSHIP: This endowed scholarship has been 
made possible through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. L. Vincent Lowe, Jr. of Wilson, 
North Carolina. The scholarship is to be awarded annually to a deserving student who 
has a minimum predicted grade point average of 2.00 on a 4.00 scale. The scholarship 
is renewable if the student maintains at least a minimum grade point average of 2.50. 

GROVES L HERRING MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND: Established in memory of 
Mr. Groves L. Herring by his family, Mr. G. L. Herring, Nancy Herring Johnson and 
Frances Herring Gay, this scholarship is available to an outstanding senior composer 
majoring in music. 

THE HILLYER MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH SCHOLARSHIP: Hillyer Memorial 
Christian Church has established this scholarship to assist a freshman student entering 
the College. First preference goes to a student who is a member of Hillyer Memorial 
Christian Church. Should there not be a candidate from the church, a student from 
another Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Wake County would be eligible to 
apply for the scholarship. 

THE ETHERIDGE-HODGENS SCHOLARSHIP FUND: This endowed scholarship was 
established by Miss Margaret Hodgens in memory of her parents and grandparents. 
First preference is given to students at the College who are members of the Belgrade 
Methodist Church, Maysville, N.C. 

THE ADA AND MONA JARVIS SCHOLARSHIP FUND: This endowed general scholar- 
ship fund was established by the Misses Jarvis of Washington, N.C. 

THE BERTHA C. JOHNSON ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: Miss Bertha C. Johnson of 
Grifton, North Carolina designated a portion of her estate to establish this endowed 
scholarship. It is to be awarded to incoming freshman students who have demonstrated 
academic success in their high school curriculum. Awards are made in joint consulta- 
tion between the Office of Admissions and the Financial Aid Office. 

ARTHUR J. KENNEDY SCHOLARSHIP FUND: This scholarship is provided through a 



28 / Financial Aid 

gift from the Armenia Christian Church in Kinston, N.C. The interest from the fund is 
given annually to a student needing financial assistance with preference given to a stu- 
dent enrolled at the College from the Armenia Christian Church. 

THE KATHLYN JACKSON KOPP SCHOLARSHIP: Funded from the estate of Mrs. 
Kopp, a 1921 graduate of the College, this scholarship will be awarded annually by the 
faculty of the Education Department to a student with a major in Teacher Education. 

THE MAMIE JENNINGS LUCAS SCHOLARSHIP: Ann Jennings Goodwin has estab- 
lished this scholarship in honor of her aunt, Mrs. Mamie Jennings Lucas, who taught 
elocution at the College from 1911 to 1913, and again, in the mid-twenties. The funds 
earned from this endowed scholarship will be awarded annually to a student who has 
demonstrated academic excellence through their high school career, or while attending 
the College. First preference will be given to the student pursuing a course of study in 
the Department of English and Modern Languages. Second preference goes to a stu- 
dent studying in the Department of Communication, Performing and Visual Arts. 
Selection of the recipient will be made by the faculty of the respective departments. 

THE W. A. LUCAS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP: Mrs. W. A. Lucas of Wilson, N.C, 
established this endowed general scholarship. 

ANGUS R. AND ELSIE BOYETTE McRACKEN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND: 
The Angus R. and Elsie Boyette McRacken Scholarship fund was established by Mrs. 
Elsie B. McRacken in 1980 to be first awarded in the fall of 1981 to Presbyterian stu- 
dents attending the College from the Kenly Presbyterian Church. Second preference of 
selection would be to students who are relatives of the McRacken family and who are 
members of the Presbyterian Church. The candidates must demonstrate an above 
average scholarship. To retain the scholarship while continuously enrolled, students 
must maintain a 2.50 grade point average. The scholarship is offered without stipula- 
tion as to major field of concentration. Financial need will be considered only as a sec- 
ondary criteria. 

THE C. B. MASHBURN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: This endowed scholarship was 
established by Mrs. Marjorie M. Lancaster in memory of her father who was a Christian 
Church (Disciples of Christ) minister, 1911 graduate of Barton, and a member of the 
Board of Trustees of Barton from 1922 to 1946. Preference is given to the Christian 
Church (Disciples of Christ) student majoring in religion. The recipient is selected by 
the faculty of the Department of Religion and Philosophy and the Chaplain of the 
College in conjunction with the Financial Aid Office. 

THE BESSIE MASSENGILL ART SCHOLARSHIP: Established in 1981 in a bequest 
from the estate of Dr. Mildred Hartsock, this scholarship honors Bessie Massengill, a 
former Dean of Women of the College. The scholarship is awarded annually to a stu- 
dent majoring in art. The recipient is selected by the art faculty of the Department of 
Communication, Performing and Visual Arts. 

THE SUE CREDLE MAY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP: Mr. and Mrs. John Milton May 
of Winterville, North Carolina have established this endowed scholarship in memory of 
their daughter, Sue Credle. First preference will be given to a student from Pitt County 
and the second preference to a student from Tyrrell County. The recipient must have a 
demonstrated financial need. 

THE SAM S. MODLIN MEMORIAL FUND: This fund was established by family and 
friends in memory of Sam S. Modlin, a 1979 graduate of the College. The interest 
earned on the principal of the Fund will be awarded to a deserving and worthy student. 
The recipient will be selected by the scholarship committee of the College. 

THE MANLY MORTON TIMOTHY FELLOWSHIP' FUND: A number of scholarships 
were established through the bequest of the late C. Manly Morton of Fort Lauderdale, 



Financial Aid / 29 

Fla., who was the first male graduate of the College. They are available to deserving 
young people who have dedicated their lives to full-time Christian service. Awards are 
made upon the recommendation of the faculty of the Department of Religion and 
Philosophy. 

THE SELAH MORTON NURSING SCHOLARSHIP FUND: This endowed scholarship 
provided by her husband, Dr. Manly Morton and friends, is available to a young man or 
woman preparing for a career in nursing. 

NORTH CAROLINA HIGH SCHOOLS MATH CONTEST SCHOLARSHIP: This is a full 
scholarship available for use at the College to one of the top 20 finalists in the Annual 
State High School Math Contest. If two or more of the top finalists elect to attend the 
College, the scholarship will be awarded to the student named by the committee for the 
State High School Math Contest. The award, a four year scholarship, will be renewed 
automatically at the end of each academic year if the recipient's overall grade point 
average is at least a 3.00. 

THE DR. RUTH O'NEAL ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: This endowed scholarship was 
established with funds from the estate of Dr. Ruth O'Neal of Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina. The earnings on the principal of this endowed fund are to be used at the dis- 
cretion of the faculty of the Department of Biological and Physical Sciences to provide 
financial assistance for students pursuing a career in science or science-related fields. 

THE WILBERT T. AND CALLORIE OWENS ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: With a 
bequest through his estate Mr. Wilbert Owens of Washington, North Carolina made 
possible the establishment of this endowed scholarship named in memory of him and 
his wife, Callorie. The scholarship offers financial assistance to academically deserving 
students. 

DR. AND MRS. W. RALEIGH PARKER, SR. SCHOLARSHIP: Established in honor of 
Dr. and Mrs. W. Raleigh Parker by their son, Dr. Walter R. Parker, Jr., this scholarship 
is available to worthy and needy students, in the fields of education, nursing, pre-med- 
ical, psychology, or other related fields. The scholarship is to be awarded annually 
upon recommendation of the respective concerned departments. 

THE WILLIE PARKER ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: Mr. Willie Parker established this 
endowed scholarship in memory of his beloved teacher and mentor, Dr. Mildred E. 
Hartsock. The recipient of this scholarship must demonstrate superior academic 
achievements, goals, and standards. Each year the award will be made on the recom- 
mendation of the Department of English and Modern Languages. 

THE CLAIRE HODGES PASCHALL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND: This 
endowed scholarship was established by Mr. J. E. Paschall and friends in memory of 
Mrs. J. E. Paschall. Income from this fund is available to a deserving student at the 
College. 

THE FRANK AND ANNA PENN SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship was established by 
Charles A. Penn and Jefferson Penn of Reidsville, N.C., as a memorial to their parents. 
It is open to any student who is a member of one of the Christian Churches in 
Rockingham County. 

THE MARY C. PIPKIN SCHOLARSHIP FUND: With a bequest from the estate of Mary 
Pipkin of Goldsboro, the College is able to grant several scholarships to needy stu- 
dents who demonstrate academic potential in their chosen field. The number of schol- 
arships is limited and the amounts vary. Application should be made through the 
Financial Aid Office by May 1 . 

THE HARRIET SETTLE PLYLER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP: Funded by a bequest 
from the estate of Mrs. Plyler, a 1911 alumnae of the College, and her son Mr. B.B. 
Plyler, Jr., the scholarship, with a stipend of $1 ,500, will be given to an upper-class stu- 



30 / Financial Aid 



dent majoring in music. Selection of the recipient will be processed by the music faculty 
of the Department of Communication, Performing and Visual Arts. Criteria for the schol- 
arship include excellence in music performance and academic achievement. The 
scholarship is renewable upon recommendation of the music faculty. 

LENA GLENN PRATT MEMORIAL FUND: This endowed scholarship was created for 
young people who plan to enter the Christian ministry. 

REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL MATH CONTEST SCHOLARSHIP: These scholarships 
are made available to winners of the Regional High School Math Contest sponsored by 
the College Department of Mathematics. The awards are given: first place, a $1 ,000 
tuition scholarship; and second place, a $550 tuition scholarship; and third place, a 
$350 tuition scholarship. 

The three scholarships are limited to mathematics majors at the College. Each scholar- 
ship is available to the recipient for four consecutive years of enrollment at Barton 
College. It is automatically renewed at the end of each academic year in which the 
recipient maintains at least a 3.00 overall academic average. The scholarships are 
awarded to the sponsoring school of the school teams winning first, second, and third 
places in the College Regional Math Contest. Sponsors for the winning teams will rec- 
ommend students for these scholarships. Final selection of the recipients will be deter- 
mined by the Department of Mathematics faculty of the College. To be a recipient the 
individual must (1) be recommended in writing by the sponsor of a school team which 
placed first, second or third in the College Regional Math Contest; (2) meet all require- 
ments for admission to the College as specified by the current general catalog; and (3) 
be selected by the Department of Mathematics faculty of the College. 

THE EMMA WIGGS RILEY MEMORIAL FUND FOR NURSING: The Emma Wiggs 
Riley Memorial Fund, established by Mr. Gibson Riley of New Bern, N.C., in memory of 
his wife, Emma Wiggs Riley, for student(s) in the junior or senior year of nursing who 
has a need for financial assistance and demonstrates scholastic merit. Priority is given 
to registered nurses working toward the baccalaureate degree in nursing. 

THE W. R. RODGERS SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship was established through the 
estate of W. R. Rodgers to be awarded to deserving students with limited financial 
means. Individual awards are based upon funds available and the need of the appli- 
cant. 

THE WILL AND SARAH CONDON RODGERS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS: 
Through the estate of Mrs. Sarah Rodgers this fund has been established in memory of 
Mrs. Rodgers and her husband. The scholarships, based on need and academic 
promise, provide for approximately two-thirds of the cost of tuition, room, board, books, 
and fees. First preference is given to students from Wilson and Greene counties in 
N.C. Applicants must apply through the Financial Aid Office by May 1 . 

THE GREATER WILSON ROTARY CLUB ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: This scholar- 
ship was established by the Greater Wilson Rotary Club and is given annually to a full | 
time student who has financial need. First preference is given to a resident of Wilson 
County. 

LILLIAN McDOUGALL RUGGIERO SCHOLARSHIP FUND: An endowed scholarship 
for students entering the full-time ministry in the Christian Church with first preference 
given to applicants from the First Christian Church of Charleston, S.C. 

THE SARATOGA CHRISTIAN CHURCH SCHOLARSHIP: The Saratoga Christian 
Church has funded an endowed scholarship to be awarded to any Barton College 
church vocations student from a member family of Saratoga Christian Church. Should 
there not be a student from the church in a given year, the scholarship is to be awarded 
in order of preference to: (1) a church vocations student from the Christian Church 



Financial Aid / 31 



(Disciples of Christ) in North Carolina; (2) a church vocations student from the Christian 
Church (Disciples of Christ); and (3) a church vocations student other than from the 
above. The recipient selection is to be made by the faculty of the Department of 
Religion and Philosophy in conjunction with the Director of Financial Aid. 

THE SAUNDERS ENDOWED MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP: Members and friends of 
the Saunders family have established this scholarship in memory of a generation of 
Saunders, namely, John, Joe, Guy, Lucy and Nan. Its purpose is to provide financial 
assistance to deserving students. First preference is given to students from the First 
Christian Church of Richlands, N.C. Students attending Richlands High School receive 
second preference. 

THE LELL AND RAY SILVERTHORNE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: Dr. Silverthorne, 
a 1941 graduate of the College and a long-time member of the Board of Trustees, and 
his wife, Lell, have established this scholarship to provide financial aid for Barton 
College students. The recipients of these funds are selected by the Office of Financial 
Aid. ' 

THE GARY F. SINGLETON SCHOLARSHIP: This endowed scholarship, established 
by Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Singleton in honor of their son, a graduate of the College, is to 
be awarded to students from the counties of Wake, Wilson, Johnston, Pitt, Greene, 
Wayne, Nash, and Edgecombe, on the basis of character, ability, scholarship, leader- 
ship, and need. Preference is given to students preparing for teaching or business 
careers. 

THE LEONA BOSWELL SMITH SCHOLARSHIP FUND: Through a gift from her 
estate, Mrs. Smith established this endowed fund. The annual earnings are to be 
awarded to a student in the Nursing Program deserving the award by reason of schol- 
arship, achievement, or need. The faculty of the Department of Nursing will make the 
selection in consultation with proper authorities in the Financial Aid Office and the 
Admissions Office. 

THE SOUTHWEST CHRISTIAN CHURCH COLEMAN MARKHAM ENDOWED 
SCHOLARSHIP: The congregation of the Southwest Christian Church of Kinston, N.C, 
has provided for a scholarship based on the earnings from an endowed fund. Granted 
on an annual basis, the scholarship will be given to selected students at the College 
with first preference being given to students who belong to Southwest Christian 
Church. Second preference is to be given to students pursuing careers in full-time 
Christian vocations. 

THE LARRY W. STALEY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP: This endowed scholarship has 
been established by Larry W. Staley, a 1966 graduate of Barton College, through his 
estate. First preference will be given to a handicapped student in financial need. 
Second preference goes to a Business and/or Accounting student with financial need. 
Selection of the recipient of this scholarship will be made by the Office of Financial Aid 
and when applicable in conjunction with the Department of Business Programs. 

THE GEORGE T. STRONACH, JR. ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: The family of George 
T. Stronach, Jr. has established this scholarship in memory of Mr. Stronach. Monies 
from this endowed fund are to be used to supplement academic scholarships granted 
by the College. 

THE TPA SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship was established by Post "T" of the North 
Carolina Directors of Travelers Protective Association of America in honor of A. A. 
Ruffin, past national president of TPA. The scholarship is awarded annually to a worthy 
and deserving student from Wilson County. 

THE RUTH C. TINGLE MEMORIAL FUND: This endowed general scholarship has 
been established by a bequest from Ruth C. Tingle, Ayden, N.C. 



32 / Financial Aid 



THE LILL CHAPMAN TOMLINSON AND GEORGE W. TOMLINSON ENDOWED 
SCHOLARSHIP: This endowed scholarship has been established by Miss Josie 
Chapman Tomlinson in memory of her mother and father. The scholarship is to be 
awarded annually to a full-time upperclass student who is a resident of North Carolina 
and who has a GPA of 2.50 or higher. First preference will be given to students in the 
Department of Communication, Performing and Visual Arts (the committee will first 
consider piano majors) and second preference will be given students with a major in 
the Department of History, Social Sciences and Social Work. 

TRIANGLE EAST ADVERTISING AND MARKETING ASSOCIATION ENDOWED 
SCHOLARSHIP: The Triangle East Advertising and Marketing Association (TEAM) has 
established an endowed scholarship to be awarded annually to a rising Junior or 
Senior majoring in Commercial Design at the College. Preference will be given to stu- 
dents with a 3.00 or more GPA and who are residents of Eastern North Carolina and 
who intend to be employed in a related field in Eastern North Carolina. 

THE J. P. TYNDALL SCHOLARSHIP: A scholarship established in honor of Dr. J.P. 
Tyndall, Professor of Biology at Barton College for 41 years. The award is presented 
annually to an outstanding senior majoring in one of the natural science disciplines. 
The recipient is selected by the faculty of the Department of Biological and Physical 
Sciences. Selection of the recipient is based on academic record, involvement in 
departmental activities and perceived potential for future contributions in science. 

THE KAYE DAWSON WARREN MEMORIAL MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP FUND: This 
endowed scholarship was established by the family and friends of the late Kaye 
Dawson Warren. It is awarded annually to a music major who demonstrates strong 
piano performance ability and an attitude indicative of good citizenship and strong lead- 
ership in the department. 

ARTHUR D. WENGER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND:This fund, established by 
friends of the late president, Arthur D. Wenger, provides for honors scholarships. One 
scholarship is awarded annually to an honor student in the amount of $500. The recipi- 
ents are to be selected by the Director of Admissions, the Director of Financial Aid, and 
the President of the College. They will be known as Wenger Scholars. Scholarships are 
renewable for up to four years if the recipient maintains a 3.00 average or above. 

WHEAT SWAMP CHRISTIAN CHURCH ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship 
was established by the congregation of Wheat Swamp Christian Church. The earnings 
derived from the endowment will provide an annual scholarship to be granted to a stu- 
dent in the following preference: 1) a member of the Wheat Swamp Church, or 2) a 
member of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Lenoir or Greene counties, N.C. 

THE C. BUREN WILLIFORD FAMILY ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship 
was established by gifts from the Williford family and Southern Piping Co., Inc. The 
recipient shall be a full time student pursuing a degree in the Department of Business 
Programs. The scholarship is given based on need and academic qualification. 

THE WILSON CIVITAN CLUB SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship, provided by the 
Wilson Civitan Club, is awarded annually to a worthy student or students. 

THE WILSON EVENING LIONS CLUB SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship is presented 
annually to a rising senior majoring in the Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing at 
the College. The scholarship carries with it a minimum award of $500 per year, and the 
recipient is to be selected by a committee of the Department of Education, which will 
establish the criteria for the selection process. 

THE WILSON SERTOMA CLUB SCHOLARSHIP: An annual award of $500, provided 
by the Wilson Sertoma Club, is given to a deaf or hard of hearing student or a student 
majoring in Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. The faculty of the Department 
of Education selects the recipient with first preference going to a Wilson County stu- 






Financial Aid / 33 



dent. In a given year should there not be a qualified Wilson County student the award 
may be given to a Barton student outside the county of Wilson. 

WILSON TEEN CLUB SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship is awarded annually to gradu- 
ates of Ralph L. Fike High School on the basis of need and merit. 

WILSON WOMAN'S CLUB NURSING SCHOLARSHIP: This is a scholarship awarded 
to a nursing student based on academic potential and financial need with preference 
given to a resident of Wilson County. The scholarship is available only to juniors or 
seniors enrolled in the professional nursing courses. The recipient of this award will be 
chosen upon the recommendation of the faculty of the Department of Nursing to the 
Admissions and Financial Aid Committee. 

NORTH CAROLINA WRITING AWARD: This $1,000 scholarship is available to those 
who are among the top 25 finalists in the N.C. Writing Award Contest sponsored by the 
State Department of Public Instruction. The scholarship is renewable as long as the 
recipient maintains at least a 3.00 GPA. 

SELF-HELP AID 

Many part-time jobs are available to students at the College to help defray the costs of 
living expenses. 

Merchants in the city of Wilson offer employment to many students of the College. 

The College offers various part-time jobs in the library, cafeteria, departmental offices 
and elsewhere. Students interested in working on campus should apply to the Director 
of Financial Aid, well in advance of each semester. To qualify, students must fill out the 
Financial Aid Form Application. 

AWARDS AND HONORS 
Awards and Honors for Seniors 

THE COGGINS CUP is awarded at May Commencement to the graduating senior who, 
in the estimation of the faculty, has the best general record in academic achievement 
and overall contribution to the College. The student must have achieved a grade point 
average of 3.00 in order to be considered for this award. 

THE HILLEY CUP is given at the May Commencement to the graduate who has 
received the highest scholastic record for his/her college career. To be considered for 
this award the student must have completed at least 60 semester hours at the College. 
Grade point average is computed on all work attempted at all colleges attended. 

THE DAVID AND CHARLOTTE BLACKWOOD AWARD is a cash gift of $100 which is 
awarded annually to the church-vocation senior who, in the opinion of the Department 
of Religion and Philosophy, is most outstanding. The recipient must be a member of 
the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and must be planning to attend a theological 
seminary. 

THE EDWARD L. CLOYD AWARD is given to the senior who has participated in athlet- 
ics at the College for four years and has the highest academic grade average after 
seven semesters in attendance at the College. 

THE CLOYD-HENDRIX PHYSICAL EDUCATION AWARD was established by Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward L. Cloyd, Jr. in memory of their parents, Dean and Mrs. Edward L. Cloyd 
and Mr. and Mrs. J. Max Hendrix. The recipient is to be a rising senior physical educa- 
tion major who is a candidate for teacher certification. The selection, made by the facul- 
ty of the Physical Education and Sports Studies Department, is based on the best gen- 
eral record in academic achievement and overall contribution to the department. 

THE COASTAL PLAINS CHAPTER OF NORTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION OF CER- 
TIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS has established an award of $250 to be given annu- 



34 / Financial Aid 



ally to the College senior majoring in accounting. The recipient must have a GPA of at 
least 3.00 and demonstrate a commitment as a CPA to work in the Coastal Region of 
North Carolina. 

THE GENE A. PURVIS MOST EXEMPLARY STUDENT AWARD is given annually to a 
rising senior in honor of Gene A. Purvis who served on the faculty of the Department of 
Education for over 27 years. The student receiving the award is selected by the 
Department of Education. Accompanying the award is a $200 tuition credit made possi- 
ble through an endowed fund established by Mr. Purvis. 

THE STAGE AND SCRIPT SENIOR AWARD, given by James E. Poole, is a $100 
cash award given annually to the graduating senior who has, in the opinion of the 
drama director, contributed the most to the development of drama on the campus. 

THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AWARD is awarded annually to the graduating 
Business Programs student in any department major who, by vote of the departmental 
faculty, is considered to be the most outstanding graduate. 

THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE AWARD is a cash prize presented to the outstanding 
senior who is a major in a modern foreign language. 

WHO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 
is a listing of outstanding students in most of the colleges and universities in the United 
States. In the fall of each year, the faculty selects a number of senior students for this 
recognition. The selection is based on scholarship, participation and leadership in 
extra-curricular activities, citizenship and service to the College, and promise in future 
usefulness. 

GRADUATION HONORS are based on academic achievement as measured by quality 
point averages. A senior whose cumulative average is between 3.30 and 3.59 gradu- 
ates cum laude; one whose cumulative average is between 3.60 and 3.89 graduates 
magna cum laude; one whose cumulative average is 3.90 or more graduates summa 
cum laude. Grade point average is computed on all work attempted at all colleges 
attended. 

THE GEORGE HARRY SWAIN BUSINESS AWARD is awarded in honor of George 
Harry Swain, who planned and developed the Department of Business of the College 
and who served faithfully and responsibly as the Department Chair for 27 years. The 
award is given annually to that graduating senior who by his/her commitment to the 
study of business has made the most significant contribution to the students and faculty 
of the Department of Business Programs. 

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL AWARD is awarded annually to the graduating 
Business Programs student voted the most outstanding in the area of economics and 
finance. 

Awards and Honors Open to All Students 

THE ROTARY CUPS are awarded in the spring to the freshman, sophomore, and 
junior who have the highest cumulative grade point averages. Grade point average is 
computed on all work attempted at all colleges attended. The Rotary Cup recipient is 
the class marshal with the highest grade point average. 

DISCIPLE BISHOPS' LEADERSHIP AWARD is granted each year by the Bishops of 
the Assemblies of the Church of Christ (Disciples of Christ) to the College student who 
has shown outstanding leadership in working on behalf of minority interests and con- 
cerns. 

THE KIWANIS CUP AWARD is given each year to the best all-around athlete. The 
objective of the award is the fostering of clean practice in sports. 

THE DUCHESS TROPHY is awarded to the student who has most effectively furnished 
participation in dramatics on the campus. 



Financial Aid / 35 



THE JOHN WALSTON DUNN ENDOWED MATHEMATICS AWARD: This award has 
been established to honor John Dunn and his forty year tenure as a Mathematics edu- 
cator at Barton College. The interest earned annually will be awarded to a deserving 
rising senior who is majoring in Mathematics to be used to defray college expenses 
(tuition) at Barton College in their senior year. The recipient will be chosen by the 
Mathematics faculty based on the following criteria: displays an enthusiasm for learn- 
ing, willingness and patience in assisting others to learn mathematics, service and con- 
tributions to the college community, leadership, and minimum grade point average of 
3.00. Priority will be given to students seeking teacher certification. 

THE MILDRED E. HARTSOCK LITERARY PRIZE consists of two cash prizes awarded 
to the students who write the best papers on a designated literary topic. 

THE MILTON H. ROGERSON PHOTOGRAPHY AWARD is funded by an endowment 
established by family and friends in honor of Milton Rogerson, former Director of Public 
Information (1961-1990). The annual stipend is given to a student who is either pursu- 
ing coursework in photography or is involved on campus as a student photographer. 

THE VICTOR R. SMALL PRIZE FOR WRITING EXCELLENCE is awarded for the best 
across-campus writing during the academic year. 

THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION SCHOLASTIC ASSISTANCE FUND, 
established in 1989, provides a source of funding to individual students and officially 
recognized student groups for non-credit experiential learning activities, which are 
external, but related to the regular educational program. Examples of such activities 
include attendance at conferences, seminars, workshops, and participation in special 
projects. Highest priority for awards will be given to those activities which have the 
greatest potential benefit for the overall educational objectives of the College. Contact 
the SGA President for application details. 

THE DEAN'S LIST is announced at the end of each semester. The list includes all full- 
time students who have achieved a grade point average of at least 3.30 for the semes- 
ter. 

THE PRESIDENT'S LIST is announced at the end of each semester. This list is limited 
to all full-time students who have achieved a grade point average of 4.00 for the 
semester. 

CLASS MARSHALS 

In the spring semester in anticipation of Commencement, class marshals are selected. 
Two marshals, a man and a woman, are chosen from the freshman class, the sopho- 
more class, and the junior class. One additional junior marshal is selected, as the chief 
marshal. Marshals are those students with the highest grade point average in their 
class. The junior with the highest grade point average is the chief marshal. Grade point 
averages are determined at the end of the fall semester and are based upon all college 
hours attempted at all colleges attended. To qualify for the position of marshal a stu- 
dent must be enrolled as a full-time student both in the fall and spring terms. To qualify 
as chief marshal a student must have completed at least 45 semester hours at the 
College. To qualify as a junior or sophomore class marshal, a student must have com- 
pleted at least 30 semester hours at the College. 

Marshals serve to lead the graduating seniors, the faculty, the administration, and other 
distinguished guests at Commencement. They also serve at other formal and festive 
ceremonies of the college year. 



36 / Student Life 

STUDENT LIFE 



Barton College offers opportunities for students to develop their interests in many acad- 
emic disciplines. The College also provides options outside of the classroom for stu- 
dents to develop themselves through various organizations, religious activities, devel- 
opment of leadership skills, athletics, recreation and cultural events. Residence life is 
an integral part of a college education where students develop their interpersonal rela- 
tionships. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The Student Government Association of the College provides students with opportuni- 
ties to express themselves on issues of concern. The Student Government also pro- 
vides a setting for learning the operations of democracy. The officers of the Student 
Government Association are elected by the members of the student body. The 
President of the Student Government Association serves as an ex-officio member of 
the College Board of Trustees. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Numerous campus organizations offer opportunities for the development of qualities of 
leadership, as well as experience in the democratic process and in social contacts. 

Greek Organizations 

There are seven social men's fraternities and women's sororities at the College. The 
fraternities are Alpha Sigma Phi, Delta Sigma Phi, Sigma Phi Epsilon, and Pi Kappa 
Phi. The sororities are Delta Zeta, Sigma Sigma Sigma, and Phi Mu. The fraternities 
are housed off campus while the sororities occupy quarters in college-owned residence 
halls. 

Honor Societies and Other Student Organizations 

The Accounting Club 

Alpha Chi (the national honor society for all students in any discipline) 

Alpha Lambda (the national honor society for religion and philosophy) 

Art Students League 

Trivia Club 

Baptist Student Union 

Campus Christian Association 

Circle K Club (student service club affiliated with Kiwanis International) 

Commercial Design Club 

Disciple Student Union 

Educators of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Club 

English Club 

Epsilon Sigma Alpha 

Gospel Choir 

Hamlin Society 

Hands for Christ-Sign Choir 

International Club 

Math Club 

Phi Beta Lambda (business fraternity) 

Photography Club 

Physical Education Club 

Pi Gamma Mu (the national social science honorary) 

Psychology Club 

Republican Club 



Student Life / 37 



Science Club 

Social Science Club 

Stage and Script 

Student National Education Association 

Student Nurse Organization 

Theta lota of Sigma Theta Tau 

Totally Christian Fellowship 

Young Democrat Club 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

THE COLLEGIATE is a bi-monthly newspaper published by the student body. The 
paper affords an opportunity for open discussion of matters of concern to the student. 

THE PINE KNOT, the College yearbook, is published near the end of each academic 
year. The annual serves as a permanent record of the year's activities. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The Concert, Lecture and Convocation Committee invites distinguished speakers, 
artists, and entertainers to the campus each year. Stage and Script, the College dra- 
matic organization, offers a variety of theatrical performances and the Department of 
Communication, Performing and Visual Arts presents concerts and recitals throughout 
the year. The Campus Activities Board of the Student Government Association brings 
popular entertainers and groups to the campus and sponsors events such as outdoor 
concerts, dances, comedy and novelty acts, and solo performers. 

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT 

The Department of Greek Life and Leadership Development provides activities and 
programs throughout the academic year designed to enhance the qualities and skills of 
effective leaders. The Leadership Education Advancement Program Series 
(L.E.A.P.S.) is in place to provide a venue where participants can learn about and 
develop these skills by working with accomplished leaders from campus and the com- 
munity. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

The religious program is designed to undergird and permeate the total life experience 
of each student. The College has a Chaplain on its staff. This person coordinates the 
religious life program and counsels with members of the College community in matters 
of personal and spiritual concerns. The Campus Christian Association provides 
retreats, concerts, lectures, and programs of religious significance. The Association, 
which is directed by an advisor and a student-elected cabinet, seeks to provide oppor- 
tunities for students to discover, question, and to develop an awareness and under- 
standing of the role of faith in the life of the academic community and in the whole 
scope of human existence. 

The Alpha Lambda Lectures are sponsored by the Religion and Philosophy Honor 
Society. Students work with a faculty advisor to promote these Allan Sharp Religion In 
Life lectures early in the Fall semester each year. Past lecturers have included Dr. 
William Willimon, Minister to the University, Duke University and Rabbi Dan Ornstein of 
Beth Meyer Synagogue, Raleigh, N.C. 

The Thedford G. and Woodrow W. Sprinkle Lectureship was established in 1980 by 
a gift of $20,000 from Stephen V. Sprinkle as a memorial to his father and uncle. The 
income of this fund is used for a series of lectures on theology and preaching given 
each March. Lecturers are chosen by the Department of Religion and Philosophy. 



38 / Student Life 



The Purcell Bible Conference was established in 1984 in honor of Eugene G. 
Purcell, Jr., who was a distinguished member of the Department of Religion and 
Philosophy for many years. 

Chapel Services are offered on an occasional basis. The College community typically 
gathers for worship around major holidays or College sponsored events, such as: 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, Homecoming (in October) and Baccalaureate (in conjunction 
with Spring Commencement). 

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION 

A well-rounded athletic program is fostered by the College. Although intercollegiate 
sports are encouraged, the faculty seeks to maintain a healthy interest in intramural 
sports so that a greater number of students may benefit from sports activities. 

Eligibility to represent the College in intercollegiate sports is governed by the regula- 
tions of the College, by the constitutional requirements of the Carolinas Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference and by the NAIA (District 26). The College participates in the fol- 
lowing intercollegiate sports: basketball, softball, tennis, and volleyball for women; 
baseball, basketball, golf, soccer, and tennis for men. Intramural and recreational ser- 
vices are conducted through the Student Life Division of the College. The major pro- 
grams and services include, but are not limited to, intramural sports, informal recre- 
ation, equipment check-out services and various fitness programs. 

STUDENT SERVICES 

Barton College offers a variety of Counseling Services designed to assist students in 
their development and adjustment within the college community from the time of admis- 
sion through graduation. These services are conducted by the Student Life Division 
through the offices of the Director of Counseling, the College Chaplain, and the 
Division of Academic Affairs through the office of the Director of Career Planning and 
Placement. Additionally, students are eligible to seek on-going counseling services at 
minimal or no charge at the Wilson-Greene Counseling Center located adjacent to 
Wilson Memorial Hospital. 

STUDENT HEALTH PLAN: All full-time students attending the College are enrolled in 
the basic sickness and accident plan for a fee. To be exempt from this coverage and 
fee, A SIGNED WAIVER CARD WITH EVIDENCE OF COMPARABLE COVERAGE 
WITH A MEDICAL INSURANCE COMPANY MUST BE RECEIVED IN THE COLLEGE 
BUSINESS OFFICE BY REGISTRATION DAY. This plan protects insured students on 
and off the campus, at home or while traveling, 24 hours per day, for the term of the 
policy and pays all usual, reasonable, and customary expenses subject to the excep- 
tions and reductions specified in the policy. 

The Bookstore stocks all required textbooks and reading materials. It also carries a 
wide selection of Barton College insignia items, including stationery and clothing, as 
well as other gift items, cards, art supplies, and school supplies. The store is located on 
the lower level of the Hamlin Student Center, and is open during regular class sched- 
ules from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Hours for Weekend College 
will be posted. 

The Post Office is located on the lower level of the Hamlin Student Center. The station 
is operated by the College under contract with the United States Postal Service. Post 
Office boxes are assigned to full-time students living on campus and faculty/staff mem- 
bers by department. United Parcel Service also delivers to this post office station. 

STUDENT HOUSING 

All full-time students in the Fall and Spring semesters, who do not reside with their own 
families, parents, or relatives, are required to live in College housing when such facili- 



Student Life / 39 



ties are available. All full-time and part-time students not residing with relatives may 
secure housing in off-campus facilities only when the residence halls are filled to 
capacity and permission to reside off campus has been granted by the Director of 
Residence Life. All students, full time and part time, must secure permission [in writing] 
from the Director of Residence Life before making housing arrangements in off-cam- 
pus facilities. Part-time students in this category may also be required to reside on 
campus as space and availability dictate. Full-time students will have priority in housing 
assignments. Housing eligibility for part-time students will be determined by the 
Director of Residence Life. 

Please note that more specific information regarding housing policies is published in 
the Student Handbook. 

HOUSING APPLICATION 

Applications for campus housing must be submitted for each year and/or semester in 
which housing is desired. The application process will vary according to a student's 
classification as a new or continuing student. Re-admission status is considered the 
same as new student status. 

New Students: As part of the formal College admission process, new students are 
required to indicate their housing needs. This constitutes the housing application for 
new students. 

Continuing Students: Continuing students are required to complete a housing applica- 
tion each year at a time announced by the Director of Residence Life. Usually, this time 
will coincide with the class pre-registration period in each semester. 

An application for campus housing does not necessarily ensure an assignment to 
housing. In order to be eligible to apply for housing, students must: 

1. Meet all academic and financial requirements for entrance to or continuation in 
College. 

2. Be pre-registered as a full-time student for the semester in which the reservation is 
made. 

The requirement for pre-registration does not apply to new students. Under certain con- 
ditions, exceptions to the full-time student status may be made by the Director of 
Residence Life. Those students who have not physically occupied their assigned room 
or otherwise made arrangements through the Director of Residence Life by the start of 
classes will have their assignment canceled and the room will be made available to 
other applicants. 

ROOM ASSIGNMENTS 

Room assignments are made by the Director of Residence Life. Requests for room- 
mates and location will be considered; however, final decisions will be based on the 
overall College policy and general student welfare. Permission must be obtained from 
the Residence Manager before room or roommate changes can be made. Students 
who have received "forced" privates [i.e., their roommate failed to come] will be given 
two weeks to submit to the Director of Residence Life written notification of their desire 
for a roommate and to participate in the room consolidation process. Otherwise, it will 
be assumed said student desires a private room and will be billed an additional 
$200.00 in rent for single occupancy in a double occupancy room. The College also 
reserves the right to assign students to private rooms without additional cost. 

GUARANTEED RESERVATIONS 

Room assignments are normally made in the order in which applications are received. 
Continuing students wishing to have a guaranteed assignment may do so by making a 



40 / Student Life 



room reservation deposit of $100. New students applying to the College and requesting 
campus housing, who have paid the $100 tuition deposit, will not be required to pay a 
room reservation deposit in order to receive a guaranteed room assignment. The tuition 
deposit will be considered, for the purposes of room assignments, as a reservation 
deposit. Applications for housing, accompanied by the reservation deposit, will be con- 
sidered in the order in which they are received and given priority over applications not 
accompanied by a deposit. Reservations will not be held longer than the start of class- 
es on the first day of the semester. 

Payment of Reservation Fee: The reservation deposit is due at the time of application 
for campus housing and will be applied to the total room charges for the semester. 
Refunds of Reservation Fee: Refunds of room reservation deposits will be made 
upon receipt of written notification of cancellation, provided the notification is received 
by the deadline specified below. Cancellation notices are to be sent to the Director of 
Residence Life. 

Fall Semester Not Later Than June 30 

Spring Semester Not Later Than December 

THE HOUSING CONTRACT 

The payment of room fees does not constitute a leasee-leasor contract. While the stu- 
dent is a resident in a residence hall, the occupancy of the residence hall is a use of a 
College facility. This usage does not give the same latitude as does a leasee-leasor 
rental contract. The College reserves the right to deny housing to any student whose 
conduct, in its judgment, is inconsistent with the aims and purposes of the institution 
and whose continuation as a resident student is deemed detrimental to himself/herself 
or to his/her fellow students. Any resident student who demonstrates by deed or action 
an inability or unwillingness to abide by the rules and regulations established for the 
welfare of all residents may be required to relinquish their privilege of occupancy. In 
such cases, there will be no refund of room fees. Decisions regarding housing contract 
matters will be handled through administrative rather than disciplinary processes. 



STUDENT CONDUCT 

Academic institutions exist for the transmission of knowledge, the pursuit of truth, the 
development of students, and the general well-being of society. Free inquiry and free 
expression are indispensable to the attainment of these goals. The College recognizes 
the right of a student to formulate his/her own philosophy and to respond to important 
issues as a matter of paramount importance which must be zealously guarded. The 
fact that this freedom is sometimes misused and finds expression in unacceptable con- 
duct must not, however, lead to its abridgment. Standards and regulations of the 
College governing student conduct have been formulated to meet the needs of the 
entire college community. These are published in the Student Handbook, Student 
Honor System and Judicial System Handbook, and other college publications which 
are distributed and available to students upon matriculation and at the beginning of 
each academic year. A student comes under the jurisdiction of College regulations 
from the time of enrollment. A student enrolled at the College is also subject to federal, 
state, and local laws. A student is not entitled to greater immunities or privileges before 
the law than those enjoyed by other citizens. A student is subject to such disciplinary 
action as the Administration of the College may consider appropriate for the breach of 
federal, state, or local laws, or of College regulations. This principle extends to off-cam- 
pus conduct having an adverse effect on the College. Any violation of a campus regula- 
tion which also breaks a public law will be reported to the appropriate authorities or 
whatever action is deemed appropriate. 



Student Life / 41 



TRAFFIC REGULATIONS 

All motor vehicles that utilize the parking lots of Barton College are required to be reg- 
istered with the Business and Finance Division-Campus Safety Office. Campus park- 
ing areas are provided for students and faculty; however, the College cannot guaran- 
tee the availability of parking spaces. Parking permits will be issued to all that register 
their motor vehicles at the beginning of each academic year/semester. The parking 
permit is to be affixed to the right rear interior window of the vehicle. A temporary park- 
ing permit for an unregistered vehicle may be obtained from the Business and Finance 
Division-Campus Safety Office in Belk Administration Building. 

All parking fines incurred as a result of parking violations must be cleared prior to 
enrolling for the subsequent semester. Traffic regulations are printed in the Student 
Handbook and students should familiarize themselves with all traffic rules and regula- 
tions. If an individual receives a parking citation and wishes to appeal such, the appeal 
must be initiated in writing within 10 business days to the Director of Campus Safety in 
Belk Administration Building. 

The College is not responsible for theft, loss, or damage to vehicles on college premis- 
es or property under its control. 



42 / Academic Information 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



DEGREES AWARDED 

Barton College offers four baccalaureate degrees. 

Curricula leading to the Bachelor of Arts include majors in the following areas: 
American Studies, Biology, Chemistry, Communications, English, French, General 
Science, History, International Studies, Mathematics, Music, Physical Education, 
Political Science, Psychology, Religion and Philosophy, Social Studies, Sociology, 
Spanish, and Studio Art. 

Curricula leading to the Bachelor of Science include majors in the following areas: 
Accounting, American Studies, Art Education, Biology, Business Administration, Cell 
Biology, Communications, Education-Elementary, Education-Deaf and Hard of 
Hearing, Education-Middle School, Environmental Science, Mathematics, Medical 
Technology, Music Education, Music Recording Technology, Nursing, Physical 
Education with Teacher Certification, Political Science, Psychology, 
Psychology/Business, Social Studies, Social Work, Sports Administration, Sports 
Science, and Studio Art. 

Curricula leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts include a program with a major in the 
Department of Communication, Performing and Visual Arts. 

Curricula leading to the Bachelor of Liberal Studies include interdisciplinary tracks 
tailored to meet the needs of the Lifelong Education students. Refer to the Office of 
Lifelong Education section of this catalog for a complete description of the Bachelor of 
Liberal Studies program. 

A student may be awarded only one degree from Barton College at any one com- 
mencement. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of 126 to 134 semester hours with a grade point average of at least a 2.00 
is required to complete any of the baccalaureate degree programs at Barton College. 
Grade point average is based on work taken at the College. To earn a baccalaureate 
degree the student must complete the academic program listed below: 

1 . Completion of the requirements within the academic Major with a grade point aver- 
age of at least a 2.00 in the major. Some majors require a grade point average high- 
er than a 2.00. These requirements are listed under each department in the 
"Courses of Instruction" section of the catalog with the exception of the Bachelor of 
Liberal Studies program. Quality points for graduation and continuous enrollment 
are computed on the Barton College work only. Graduation honors are computed on 
all college work attempted. 

2. Completion of the General College Core Requirements. 

3. Electives. In addition to the courses in the general college core requirements, a stu- 
dent must have 12 semester hours of course work outside of the academic major. 
This may be a concentration, a part of a minor, a part of a second major, or a variety 
of courses. These 1 2 hours cannot be a part of the major or a part of any support 
courses for the major. Degree programs that must maintain accreditation with out- 
side agencies and have requirements exceeding 126 to 134 semester hours in their 
program are allowed to have fewer than 12 hours of unencumbered electives. 
These programs include: Medical Technology, Music Education, and Nursing. 

4. Transfer Credit. Up to 64 semester hours of the hours required for graduation may 
be transferred from a two-year institution. 



Academic Information / 43 



GENERAL COLLEGE CORE REQUIREMENTS 

A student is required to complete the following general college core requirements as a 
part of the degree program: 

1. BARTON COLLEGE SEMINAR. 2 semester hours. 

Each freshman student must take a minimum of 9 hours core requirements each 
semester. 

BCS 1 01 . Freshman Seminar I. 

BCS 102. Freshman Seminar II. 

2. WRITING PROFICIENCY. (6 to 9 semester hours). 

This requirement may be satisfied by testing out of all of ENG 101 and 102, by test- 
ing out of ENG 101 and by successfully completing ENG 102 or 103, or by suc- 
cessfully completing ENG 101 and 102. A full-time student must be enrolled in ENG 
100, 101, 102, or 103 during every regular session (Fall and Spring semesters) until 
the Writing Proficiency requirement has been met. Any exception must be approved 
by the Petitions Committee. 

During orientation, a student will be placed into ENG 100, 101, 102, or 103. 
Placement is determined by the Department of English and Modern Languages, or 
by the results of other accepted standardized testing. The Freshman Writing 
Program is competency based. The student is tested at the end of each course and, 
if the test scores indicate that the student has the required skills, the student is 
assigned to the next course in the sequence. To satisfy the Writing Proficiency 
Requirement, a student entering ENG 100 will have a 9-hour Writing Proficiency 
Requirement. A student missing twenty-five percent or more of the ENG 100, 101, 
or 102 classes in one semester will receive an officially recorded "F" for 3 hours of 
English. 

3. COMPUTATIONAL PROFICIENCY. 3-4 semester hours. 

This requirement may be satisfied by successfully completing the MAT 100 and 101 
sequence, or MAT 102. A student who tests out of MAT 100, 101, and 102 through 
the Mathematics Placement Program has satisfied the computational Proficiency 
requirement. The MAT 100 and 101 sequence or MAT 102 may not be counted as 
part of the Natural Science and Mathematics requirement below. A student who is 
placed in the MAT 100 and 101 sequence will have a 4-hour Computational 
Proficiency requirement. A student who is placed in MAT 102 will have a 3-hour 
Computational Proficiency requirement. Credit is not granted for both the MAT 100 
and 101 sequence and MAT 102. A student whose Mathematics placement is MAT 
106 (Trigonometry and Advanced Algebraic Topics) or MAT 109 (Introductory 
Calculus), who enrolls in the course in which placed, receives placement credit on 
the transcript for MAT 102 upon successful completion (with a grade of "C-" or bet- 
ter) of MAT 106 or MAT 109. 

4. THE HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS. 15 semester hours. 

This requirement must include at least one course from each of the following areas: 
Literature, History, Religion, Fine Arts. One additional course must be chosen from 
any of these four areas. The additional course may be any course not taken from 
the required lists or any course in the optional lists. 

LITERATURE. 

Required - one course chosen from the following list: 

ENG 200. Introduction to Literature. * 

ENG 204. World Authors I. 

ENG 205. World Authors II. 
Optional: 

ENG 207. Film Appreciation. 



44 /Academic Information 



HISTORY. 

Required - one course chosen from the following list: 

HIS 1 01 . History of Civilization to 1 789. 

HIS 1 03. History of Civilization to 1 789 - Honors. By invitation. 

Optional: 

HIS 202. United States since 1 877. 

RELIGION 

Required - one course chosen from the following list: 

REL 1 01 . Introduction to the Bible. 

REL102. Exploring Christian Thought. 

REL 120. Introduction to the Bible - Honors. By invitation. 
Optional: 

PHI 201 . Introduction to Philosophy. 

PHI 21 1 . History of Philosophy I. 
FINE ARTS. 

Required - one course chosen from the following lists: 

ART 080. Art Appreciation - Lecture. 

ART 081 . Art Appreciation - Studio. 

ART 082. Art Appreciation - Honors Lecture. By invitation. 

MUS 090. Music Survey. 

MUS 091 . Contemporary Music. 

MUS 093. Music in America. 

MUS 223. History of Music I. 

MUS 224. History of Music II. 

DRA 01 3. Theater Appreciation - Shop. 

DRA 01 7. Introduction to Theater. 

5. THE SOCIAL SCIENCES. 6 semester hours. 

This requirement may be satisfied by completing two courses. These courses must 
be from two different disciplines. 

ECONOMICS. 

ECO 231 . Principles of Macroeconomics. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

GEO 202. Physical Geography. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

POL 201 . American Government and Politics. 

POL 202. State and Local Government. 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 110. Introductory Psychology. Students seeking teacher certification 

must substitute PSY 223 (Educational Psychology) for PSY 
110. 

PSY 112. Psychology of Individual Adjustment. 

SOCIOLOGY. 

SOC 201 . Principles of Sociology. 

6. SPORTS SCIENCE. 2 semester hours. 

This requirement may be satisfied by completing one Physical Fitness course and 
by completing one Lifetime Activity course. 



PED100. 


Swimming for Fitness 


PED101. 


Total Fitness. 


PED102. 


Jogging for Fitness. 


PED 103. 


Aerobic Dance. 


PED104. 


Walking. 



Academic Information / 45 



LIFETIME ACTIVITY. 

A course may be chosen from any 100-level Physical Education (PED) course 
except those listed in the Physical Fitness list. 

7. THE NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS. 11 semester hours. 

This requirement must include at least eight semester hours of natural sciences. 
Students with a major in most teacher certification programs must use SCI 101 , 
Physical Science and SCI 102, Earth Science, in partial fulfillment of this require- 
ment. Refer to specific program requirements. Note: Where two numbers are 
separated by " / ", the number on the left designates the 3-hour lecture course 
and the number on the right designates the 1-hour laboratory course. 



BIOLOGY. 

BIO 101/103. 
BIO 102/104. 



BIO 105/107. 

BIO 106/108. 

BIO 011. 
BIO 012. 

BIO 206. 

CHEMISTRY. 

CHE 120/121. 
CHE 151/153. 
CHE 152/154. 
CHE 200/201. 

PHYSICS. 

PHY 130/131. 



Principles of Biology I. 3/1 semester hours. 
Principles of Biology II. 3/1 semester hours. BIO 102/104 may 
not be selected unless BIO 101/103 has been successful- 
ly completed. 

General Botany. 3/1 semester hours. BIO 106/108 may not be 
selected unless BIO 101/103 has been successfully complet- 
ed. 

General Zoology. 3/1 semester hours. BIO 106/108 may not be 
selected unless BIO 101/103 has been successfully complet- 
ed. 

Plants and Animals of the North Carolina Coast and Estuaries. 
3 semester hours. Offered in summer session only. 
Plants and Animals of the North Carolina Mountains. 3 semes- 
ter hours. Offered in summer session only. 
Introductory Microbiology. 4 semester hours. 

Fundamentals of Chemistry. 3/1 semester hours. 
General College Chemistry I. 3/1 semester hours. 
General College Chemistry II. 3/1 semester hours. 
Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry. 3/1 semester 
hours. 



PHY 132/134. 



General Physics I. 3/1 semester hours. Prerequisite: MAT 
104 or equivalent. 

General Physics II. 3/1 semester hours. Prerequisite: MAT 
106 or equivalent. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Any 100- or 200-level Mathematics course (except MAT 100, 101, or 102) listed in 
the catalog for which the student has the required prerequisites. 

GLOBAL AND CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE. 6-9 hours. 
OPTION 1: Nine semester hours from the following list of Global and Cross-Cultural 
courses. The three courses must be taken from different areas. Note: Not more 
than one course may be taken in the student's major. This rule does not apply 
for education majors. 

OPTION 2: Three semester hours of a single foreign language and six semester 
hours from two different disciplines in the following list of Global and Cross-Cultural 
courses. 

OPTION 3: Six semester hours of a single foreign language. The student's starting 
point in a foreign language (elementary, intermediate, or above) is to be determined 
mined by a placement test. A student who tests above the intermediate level will 



46 / Academic Information 



have satisfied the Global and Cross-Cultural requirement, but will receive no credit 
hours. A student who tests above the intermediate level and successfully completes 
a 300-level course in the same language will receive credit for three semester 
hours for the course and six hours of advanced placement credit fora total of nine 
hours. 

Note: A student whose native language is not English may satisfy the Global and 
Cross-Cultural Perspective requirement by taking six hours in two different disciplines 
from the global and cross-cultural courses or by taking six hours of a single foreign lan- 
guage different from the native language. The College currently offers the following lan- 
guages, which can be used to satisfy the requirements in Options 2 and 3: French, 
German, Greek, and Spanish. 

Global and Cross-Cultural Courses: 

ART AREA: 

ART 090. Art History I - Ancient through Middle Ages. 
ART 091 . Art History II - Renaissance through Modern. 

GEOGRAPHY AREA: 

GEO 201 . World Regional Geography. 

HISTORY AREA: 

HIS 1 02. History of Civilization since 1 789. 

HIS 104. History of Civilization since 1789 - Honors. By invitation. 

LITERATURE AREA: 

ENG 206. Oriental Literature. 
ENG 208. Women Writers. 

MUSIC AREA: 

MUS 092. Music of the World's Cultures. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE AREA: 

POL 203. Introduction to International Relations. 

RELIGION/PHILOSOPHY AREA: 

REL110. World Religions. 

PHI 212. History of Philosophy II. 

SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY AREA: 

ANT 201 . Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. 

Note: One travel course of three semester hours may count as one of the courses in 
this list. The course must be taught by a Barton College faculty member who accompa- 
nies the student, must contain rigorous reading and writing requirements, and must be 
consistent with one of the global and cross-cultural courses listed above (that is, it must 
be focused on a particular aspect of one of the disciplines). The course must also 
involve actual travel in another country of at least 14 days, and it must be approved by 
the Curriculum Committee by October 15 for courses to be taught in the following sum- 
mer. 

ADDITIONAL DEGREE REGULATIONS 

A minimum of 45 semester hours of work taken at Barton College is required of a stu- 
dent seeking a degree from the College. Of the 45 hours, 30 must be in junior, senior, 
and/or multi-level courses. Of the 45, at least 1 5 must be in the major (nine of which, 
must be in junior, senior, or mullti-level courses). In all cases the final 30 hours must be; 
taken in residence. An average of at least a "C" is required in both the major and the 
minor. 

Students who have completed at least 72 semester hours at Barton College may take up to 
12 semester hours of the last 30 hours at another accredited college or university. Students 



Academic Information / 47 



who wish to pursue this option must file a petition with the Office of the Registrar before 
undertaking the off-campus work. 

TRANSFER CREDIT FOR CORE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who transfer credits toward the College Core Requirements from another 
accredited college or university who fall one hour short in a multi-course area have met 
the requirement for that multi-course area. (This exception does not apply in the Sports 
Science requirement.) 

CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT AT ANOTHER COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY 

i 

Students, while enrolled at Barton College, must receive permission from the Petitions 
Committee to enroll for courses at another institution. Credit for these courses will be 
treated as transfer credit. Quality points will not be given and no credit will be given for 
grades below a "C." 

ADVISEMENT PROGRAM 

Barton College is committed to maintaining a comprehensive advising system to assist 
each student in realizing the greatest possible benefit from the college experience. 
Each student has a faculty advisor who coordinates the resources of the institution to 
accomplish the following goals and purposes: 

1) To assist the student in adjusting to college life and in growing in personal respon- 
sibility and maturity. 

2) To assist the student in identifying needs, clarifying values, and establishing edu- 
cational and career goals commensurate with abilities. 

3) To assist the student in planning and implementing a suitable curriculum. 

One notable feature of the Advisement Program is the Freshman Advising Team. 
Although a freshman student may still indicate an intended major, a member of a 
trained team of advisors will be the student's advisor for the first year. The Freshman 
Advisor will also serve as the freshman's BCS instructor. During the second semester 
Df the freshman year, when formally declaring a major, the student will be assigned an 
advisor within the major department. Each department has a system of advising that 
has been developed within the framework of its own characteristics and needs and at 
!he sophomore, junior and senior levels, advising is carried out within the major depart- 
ment. 

r Academic advising is a two-way process. Each student is ultimately responsible for 
•monitoring his/her own program and progress. It is the responsibility of every Barton 
^College student to make appointments and meet with advisors throughout every 
'semester. Attendance at departmental preregistration meetings and advisor-advisee 
-meetings are of extreme importance to every student and are considered to be a vital 
oart of program planning. 

BARTON COLLEGE SEMINAR 

BCS 101. FRESHMAN SEMINAR I. 1. A course designed for freshmen to provide the 
necessary tools for making a good adjustment to college life both academically 
and socially. Offered only in the fall. Required of all first-year freshmen. 

.BCS 102. FRESHMAN SEMINAR II. 1. The second segment of the program focuses 
on the process of decision making, career planning, and ultimately declaring a 
major. Each department will participate by presenting information about its majors 
and careers associated with them. The program is educational for all students and 
provides information about the liberal arts as well as professional courses. Other 



48 / Academic Information 



topics pertinent to the freshman year are also discussed and includes information 
on health-related issues. Required of all first-year freshmen. 

THE HONORS PROGRAM 

The Honors Program at Barton College offers special learning opportunities for academ- 
ically capable students who wish to be challenged beyond the normal classroom 
requirements. The program is designed to allow these students to reach their full 
potential during their undergraduate years. 

Participation in the Honors Program allows students to obtain a broad general educa- 
tion and to graduate with honors in their academic majors. The program provides sev- 
eral types of educational experience, including interdisciplinary courses, special honors 
sections of general college courses, and honors components of regular courses and 
honors components of courses within the major. Enrollment in the interdisciplinary spe- 
cial topics courses and in the honors sections of general college courses is kept small 
to allow maximum opportunities for interaction with faculty and other students. Of the 
required 1 8 hours of approved honors courses, at least nine must be taken in the major 
and nine must be taken outside the major. Students may, of course, take more than 18 
hours of honors courses. 

During the senior year students will take a senior honors thesis course in the major. 
This course is designed to bring into focus some particular interest and to function as a 
capstone for the college learning experience. The course will require the completion of 
a substantial paper and will count for three semester hours credit. 

Entering freshmen with a predicted grade point average of at least 3.25 may qualify for 
acceptance into the Honors Program. Prospective honors students will submit a letter 
explaining their interest in the program and will arrange for a letter of recommendation 
to be sent by a guidance counselor or teacher. Transfer students desiring acceptance 
into the Honors Program should follow the same procedure. Students who have been 
at Barton College for one semester or more should submit a letter explaining their inter- 
est in the program and a letter from one of their professors at the College. Honors 
courses available to freshmen include History of Civilization Honors (HIS 103-104), 
Composition and Literature Honors (ENG 103), Introduction to Bible Honors (REL 120), 
and Art Appreciation Honors (ART 082). 

In order to remain in good standing in the Honors Program, students must maintain an 
overall grade point average of 3.25 or higher and must achieve at least a "B" in each 
honors course. 

For further information contact the Office of the Dean of the College. 

REGISTRATION 

Each student is expected to register on the designated registration day at the beginning 
of each semester or summer term. Registration includes academic advising, selection 
of courses, obtaining student ID card, registering auto, paying fees, and picking up offi- 
cial class schedule. To be officially registered fees must be paid to the Business Office 
by 4 p.m. of the second day of registration. A student who registers for a course and 
decides not to take the course must drop it through the official drop/add form. If the 
course is not officially dropped through the Registrar's Office a failing grade may be 
recorded for the course because of lack of class attendance. Late .registrations require 
the approval of the Registrar and the Vice President for Enrollment Services. Any 
approval granted after the last day for registration will be charged a $25 late registra- 
tion fee. Students are required to attend meetings scheduled by advisors or department 
chairs for registration purposes. 



Academic Information / 49 



PRE-REGISTRATION 

Students currently enrolled in Barton College may register for the following semester 
during the pre-registration period. Pre-registration for spring semester is held in 
November. Pre-registration for fall semester and summer sessions is held in late 
March. As a part of the pre-registration process each student receives a computer 
print-out of his/her class schedule and a listing of charges. Students who pre-register 
are required to complete the registration procedures on the designated registration 
dates at the beginning of the semester. Schedules for students who fail to pay by the 
stipulated time are subject to cancellation. Pre-registration is open only to students cur- 
rently enrolled in Barton College. 

PRE-REGISTRATION CLASS GUARANTEE 

A currently enrolled student who pre-registers for a class will be guaranteed a place in 
the class through the first class meeting. If the student is not in attendance at the first 
sclass meeting his/her place may be reassigned to another student. A pre-registered 
student who is prevented from attending the first class meeting must call the class 
instructor or the Dean of the College prior to the class meeting time to ensure his/her 
place in class. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

I 

iStudents having fewer than 27 semester hours of credit are classified as freshmen; 
[hose with 27 to 61 semester hours are classified as sophomores; those with 62 to 91 
, semester hours are classified as juniors; those with 92 semester hours or more are 
.classified as seniors. 

COURSE LOAD LIMITATIONS 

rThe normal college course load is 12 to 17 semester hours exclusive of the physical 
-education activity courses and the music performing group courses. 

'A student who has completed 62 semester hours may enroll for 18 semester hours of 
academic work. 

To enroll in more than 18 hours in any one semester, a student must receive permis- 
sion from the Petitions Committee. 

f 

r A student with a low grade point average may be required to have a reduced course 
load. 

A student who works for more than 25 hours per week should not carry more than 12 
semester hours per semester. 

AUDITING COURSES 

: A full-time student may audit classes without charge if the total semester hours of credit 
and audit courses is 18 or fewer. When the total semester hours for credit and audit 
.courses exceeds 18, the student is charged one-half of the additional hourly for-credit 
tuition rate for each semester hour over 18. Part-time students will pay normal tuition 
Tor credit courses and one-half tuition for audit courses. Twelve hours of credit courses 
,or audit courses, or any combination of the two categories, is considered a full load. 

-\n order to audit a course, a student must have the permission of the instructor and go 
i through normal registration procedures. Courses may not be changed to audit after the 
Mast day for adding courses. 
If 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

All individualized study programs (independent study, directed study, practicums, indi- 



50 / Academic Information 



vidualized problems, special studies, and research problems) are open only to junior 
and senior-level students. Such studies are limited to the area of the student's major, or 
minor. For such an individualized study program in a minor, a student must have suc- 
cessfully completed nine hours in a field outside the major. To enroll in an individual- 
ized study program, the student must have a 2.50 overall grade point average and a 
2.50 in the major or minor. A student may count no more than six hours of individual- 
ized study in the hours required for graduation. 

An individualized study, which will substitute for an established course in the curricu- 
lum, requires the review and the approval of the department in which the established 
course is listed. 

A topic proposed for the individualized study, a statement of the problem, and an out- 
line of the study will be submitted to the Department Chair and to the Dean of the 
College early in the term of study (within three to four weeks). A proposed schedule of 
meeting dates between the instructor and the student to develop and carry out the indi- 
vidualized study will also be included in the report. 

Any exceptions to the guidelines must be approved by the Chair of the student's major 
department and by the Dean of the College. 

PASS/FAIL COURSES 

Certain courses are specified in the catalog as having the option of using the Pass/Fail 
grade. In addition, a junior or senior-level student may elect up to twelve semester 
hours using the Pass/Fail grade. A student may register for course requirements in the 
major on a Pass/Fail basis if the appropriate department indicates that these courses 
are available on a Pass/Fail basis. No course may be taken to satisfy the general col- 
lege core requirements on a Pass/Fail basis. The student must declare intention to take 
a course as Pass/Fail by the end of the drop-add period. A student must have 100 
hours exclusive of Pass/Fail grades for graduation. Pass/Fail courses with a grade of 
"P" earn course credits but are not computed in determining grade point average. 
Pass/Fail courses with a grade of "F" are computed as any other "F" in determining 
hours and grade point average. 

In a Pass/Fail course, a grade of "P" will be granted when the quality of the student's 
work is the equivalent of a "C" or better. An "F" will be granted when the quality of the 
work is judged to be below a "C." 

CAREER SERVICES CENTER 

The Career Services Center assists students and alumni with the career exploration 
process and with securing employment. Students or alumni who want to talk with a pro- 
fessional staff member about their career plans may make an appointment. 
Professional staff are available to assist students and alumni in deciding their major, 
assessing their skills and interests, exploring information about jobs, arranging informa- 
tional interviews or internships, critiquing resumes, developing employment interview- 
ing skills, and determining job hunting strategies. 

The Career Resource Center maintains career information, employer literature, job list- 
ings for full-time, part-time, and summer employment, internships, school district appli- 
cations, and graduate school information. The Resource Center is open from 8:15-5:00 
Monday through Friday. 

A variety of workshops are offered throughout the year such as resume writing, inter- 
viewing, and conducting a job search. Students are encouraged to begin the job search 
process at least nine months before their date of graduation. 

Seniors and alumni are encouraged to register with the Career Services Center to 



Academic Information / 51 



receive additional placement services. The following additional services are available to 
registered seniors and alumni: 

1. ON CAMPUS RECRUITING: Representatives from business, industry, government, 
health, and public school systems come to the Center each year to interview registered 
students and alumni for prospective openings. 

2. CREDENTIALS FILES: The credentials file consists of a student's resume, recom- 
mendations, and transcript. Registered students may request that faculty members, 
internship or fieldwork supervisors, and employers submit recommendations directly to 
the Career Services Center. Photocopies of the credentials file are sent to employers 
or to graduate school admission offices at the request of the student. 

3. REFERRAL SYSTEM: Employer staffing needs are matched with registered stu- 
dent's majors and interests. Employers may directly contact potential job applicants for 
interviews. 

4. SPECIAL EVENTS: The Career Services Center sponsors special events to meet 
specific needs of students. These programs include: Career Day, Nursing Career Day, 
and Teacher Recruitment Day. 

EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM (internships) 

Barton College strongly supports programs which allow the student to relate classroom 
learning to work experience, active internship programs provide opportunities through- 
out the academic year and during summers for the student to explore careers, to inte- 
grate theory with practice, and to examine future job possibilities. Barton College stu- 
dents have participated in internships in several locations. These include such sites as 
Washington, D.C. (through The Washington Center); Richmond, Virginia; London, 
England; and such North Carolina cities as Wilson, Raleigh, and Winston-Salem. The 
career fields related to these internships include such areas as public information, inter- 
national business, retail management, quality control, environmental science, art, com- 
mercial design, advertising, sales, and training. 

In each Experiential Educationintemship the student's work assignment is supervised 
and evaluated by Barton College faculty. Internships are directly related to majors or 
minors; they may be full-time or part-time; and they may be paid or unpaid. The student 
earns academic credit (1 to 4 semester hours) for the learning that occurs in the work- 
based internship. Academic credit earned in experiential programs is elective credit, 
unless an exception is made by the department of the student's major program. 

Eligibility requirements: 

• Junior or Senior standing with at least 61 semester hours completed. 
Transfer Students must have completed at least 30 semester hours at Barton 
College. 

• 2.50 minimum grade point average. 

• Approval by a faculty sponsor and by the Director of Career Services Center. 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION AND CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

Barton College grants course-equivalent credit for College Board Advanced Placement 
Program scores and for the subject exams of the College Level Examination Program 
(CLEP). Each department determines the minimal score required for credit on exami- 
nations in its area. The CLEP Program is administered by the Director of Career 
Services. 

Correspondence courses will be accepted for credit only on the recommendation of the 
Chair of the department concerned. A student is not permitted to do correspondence 
work while registered in the College except by prior written permission of the Petitions 
Committee. 

A maximum of 30 hours of credit may be granted for Advanced Placement, CLEP 



52 / Academic Information 



Subject Examinations, correspondence courses, extension courses, challenge exami- 
nations, or any combination of these. No more than 18 hours of credit will be granted 
for correspondence courses. Credit granted for CLEP examinations is treated as trans- 
fer credit when computing grade point averages. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Students are responsible for class attendance and, even in necessary absences, are 
accountable for all academic activities and deadlines. The following is the basic atten- 
dance policy of Barton College. Some courses or programs for pedagogical reasons 
have a more stringent attendance policy. Check each syllabus for the details of class 
attendance. In 100 and 200 level courses, unexcused absences in excess of the equiv- 
alent to the number of class meetings in one week will result in a reduction of the grade 
in the course. In upper level courses and multi-level courses (000, 300 and 400 cours- 
es) students will be provided, at the beginning of the course, a written statement of 
attendance requirements for the course. In all courses students are expected to attend 
at least seventy-five percent of the class meetings. Attending less than seventy-five 
percent may result in failure in the course. 

Generally, absences are excused only for personal illness, family emergency, or for 
required participation in a college function. In all cases, the burden of proving that an 
absence is to be excused rests with the student. Faculty may require adequate and 
appropriate documentation before excusing an absence. 

Students who are absent from a class for two consecutive weeks may be dropped from 
the course with a grade of "F" unless adequate notice is given during the course of the 
absence. Notification must be given to the instructor or to the Dean of the College. 
Exces-sive absences from several classes can result in the student's being dropped 
from the College. 

Any unexcused absence taken on the last class of any course before or the first class 
of any course following an official break will be counted as a double cut. 

DROPPING OR ADDING COURSES 

A short period of time following registration is designated as "drop-add period," during 
which time courses may be dropped or added without grade penalty providing permis- 
sion has been secured from the Registrar, the student's advisor and the instructor of 
the course. A student may withdraw from any course (except BCS and Freshman 
Composition courses) with a grade of "W" up to the end of the eighth week of classes 
(for classes of less than 14 class weeks, the time is through the first fifty percent of the 
number of class days: the drop date will be indicated on the syllabus). After the eighth 
week a student must petition the Petitions Committee to withdraw from a class, except 
for documented cases of lengthy illness or withdrawal from the College. Following the 
date designated as "last day for dropping courses," any course which is dropped auto- 
matically receives the grade "F." In cases where extenuating circumstances prevail, a 
grade of "W" will be recorded provided the student is in good standing. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE 

A student who officially withdraws from Barton College will receive grades of "W." 
Official withdrawal is handled through the Office of the Vice President for Student 
Affairs 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Grade Quality Points per Semester Hour 

A Excellent 4.0 

A- 3.7 

B+ 3.3 



B 


Good 


B- 




C+ 




C 


Average 


C- 




D+ 




D 


Poor 


D- 




E 


Conditional (not a final grade) 


F 


Failure 


1 


Incomplete 


W 


Official withdrawal 



Academic Information / 53 



3.0 
2.7 
2.3 
2.0 
1.7 
1.3 
1.0 
0.7 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 



Grade point average is computed on the basis of all hours attempted at Barton College. 

Students may request a grade of incomplete when circumstances warrant such a 
grade. To be considered for an incomplete grade, students must have completed at 
least two-thirds of the requirements of the course and have attended at least two-thirds 
of the classes. (Exceptions must be cleared with the Dean of the College.) 

Normally the date for completion of a grade of incomplete is the middle of the succeed- 
ing semester. In negotiating the incomplete grade, the faculty and student must deter- 
mine an appropriate date for completion of the course. All incompletes must be com- 
pleted no later than one year following the assigning of the grade of "I." Any incomplete 
not removed by that date will be assigned a grade of "F." 

A student may repeat any course taken at Barton College in which a grade of "D" or "F" 
was earned. While the original grade will remain on the transcript, the second grade 
earned will determine credit hours and quality points earned. No course may be repeat- 
ed more than two times unless special permission is given by the Petitions Committee. 
In computing honors for graduation, all coursework taken at all institutions is calculated 
in determining honors. 

If a student should receive a grade of "F" on repeating a course for which he/she had 
formerly received a grade of "D," the hours previously earned will remain and the grade 
point average will be determined using the hours for the course only once, but no quali- 
ty points for the course. If a student repeats a course for which he/she previously had 
received a grade of "F" and on repetition receives a grade of "F," the grade point aver- 
age will be computed using the course hours only once and no quality points. 

A student may not repeat a course with the same number and content for which he/she 
has received a grade of "C" or better. Any exception requires the written permission of 
the student's advisor, the Chair of the department where the course is taught, and the 
Dean of the College. 

When a grade of "E" is received on the first term of a two-semester course, the student 
may take the second semester's work in that course. Completion of the second semes- 
ter's work with a passing grade will automatically raise the first semester grade to a "D." 
However, if the student is unable to complete the work of the second semester suc- 
cessfully, the first term must be repeated. 

HONOR LISTS 

A full-time student who has a grade point average of 4.00 is placed on the President's 
List for that semester. A full-time student who receives a grade point average of 3.30 
or above is placed on the Dean's List for that semester. 



Minimum Grade 


Point Average 


1.45 


1.60 


1.85 


2.00 



54 /Academic Information 



HONOR GRADUATION 

A candidate for graduation with an overall grade point average of 3.90 or above will be 
graduated summa cum laude; with at least a 3.60, magna cum laude, and with at 
least a 3.30, cum laude. 

GRADE POINT STANDARDS FOR CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT 

A student enrolled at Barton College is expected to perform at a level that shows acad- 
emic progress. To continue to be enrolled in the College a student must meet the mini- 
mum required grade point averages shown below: 

Total Semester 
Hours Attempted 

7-23 

24-44 

45-61 

62 and above 

A student is placed in the above retention chart based on the total number of semester 
hours credit attempted by the student at Barton College and all hours transferred from 
all institutions attended. The grade point average is computed by dividing the total 
number of quality points earned at Barton College by the total number of semester 
hours attempted at Barton College. A transfer student is placed on the retention chart 
based on the total hours attempted at all institutions attended. 

At the end of any semester, a student who earns a grade point average of .50 or 
less for the work of that semester may be suspended by the Dean of the College. 

At the end of each semester any student whose grade point average does not meet the 
minimum requirements shall be placed on academic warning for the subsequent 
semester. While on academic warning, a student may enroll in no more than 13 semes- 
ter hours. At the end of each spring semester any student on academic warning shall 
be suspended from the College for a period of at least one semester if the student's 
grade point average does not meet the minimum requirements. Students on academic 
suspension may attend the summer session at Barton College immediately following 
the semester of suspension. Suspensions may be appealed to the Petitions 
Committee. An exception is made when a student on academic warning earns at least 
a 2.75 on 12 semester hours or more or at least 2.75 on 12 semester hours or more in 
the summer session. A student will, however, remain on academic warning until the 
required minimum grade point average is achieved. 

A student who is placed on academic suspension at the end of the spring semester 
may automatically enroll in the following summer session at Barton College. A student 
on academic ineligibility who meets the minimum grade point average requirement for 
retention or who achieves a grade point average of at least 2.75 on 12 semester hours 
or more by the end of the summer session may enroll in the following semester. A stu- 
dent on academic ineligibility who does not meet the minimum requirement for reten- 
tion by the end of the summer session shall have the suspended status continued for a 
period of at least one semester. 

A student on academic suspension who is not allowed to return or who elects not to 
return for a semester may not enroll in collegiate studies in any institution of higher 
education during the semester of suspension unless granted approval by the Petitions 
Committee prior to enrollment. Students who enroll in collegiate course work during a 
semester of suspension without Petitions Committee approval may not transfer any of 
the credit hours earned to Barton College. 



Academic Information / 55 



A student on academic suspension for the first time who has been out of school at 
least one semester and who has not removed the academic ineligibility at the end of 
the summer session may be permitted to re-enroll in any subsequent semester or sum- 
mer session one time through the regular application procedures for admission. Re- 
enrollment, if permitted, will be on a probationary status. 

A student may appeal a suspension to the Petitions Committee if there are extenuating 
circumstances which may have led to the suspension (i.e, lengthy illness of student or 
immediate family member or lengthy family crisis other than illness related). The appeal 
must be received by the Petitions Committee at least five days prior to the opening of a 
semester. The Petitions Committee may request letters of evaluation, following a set 
format, from two faculty members who taught the student during the previous academic 
year or summer session. 

A student who has been placed on academic suspension a second time may not re- 
enroll at the College except for the summer terms in an effort to remove the suspension 
standing. Any exception to this policy must be approved by the Admissions Office and 
the Petitions Committee. 

The Admissions Office must submit the application for readmission and to the Petitions 
Committee at least two weeks prior to the beginning of the term in which the student 
seeks to re-enroll. 

Re-enrollment following any period of suspension is at the discretion of the Petitions 
Committee. Any student on suspension who is granted readmission by the Petitions 
Committee will be placed on academic probation and will be subject to any other stipu- 
lation the committee may deem wise. 

A student who has been out of school for any reason must make application for read- 
mission. Application forms for readmission may be obtained from the Admissions 
Office. 

A student may be enrolled in a course for no more than three times at the College 
(except certain music courses, including ensembles and applied instruction courses). A 
student who fails a course for three times may continue to enroll at the College only by 
approval of the Petitions Committee. 

Each student enrolled in Barton College is expected to be aware at all times of his or 
her academic status and to be responsible for knowing whether he or she meets the 
minimum standards for continued enrollment. 

In cases of extenuating circumstances, exceptions to continuous enrollment policy may 
be appealed in writing to the Petitions Committee. 

A veteran or eligible person will be de-certified to the Veterans Administration for termi- 
nation of veterans education benefits due to unsatisfactory progress upon academic 
suspension from the College or after two consecutive semesters of academic proba- 
tion, one of which may be a summer session. To be re-certified to the VA the veteran 
or eligible person must bring the cumulative average up to the standard of satisfactory 
academic progress as defined in the College Catalog. When the student has again 
reached satisfactory academic progress, the student's enrollment for the next semester 
will be re-certified to the VA for educational benefits. 

Student academic records are reviewed at the end of each semester and summer ses- 
sion. Barton College's retention scale and probation and suspension policies will pre- 
vent a veteran or eligible person from being certified to the Veterans Administration if 
there is no likelihood that the requirements for graduation can be met. 
A veteran or eligible person who is suspended from Barton College because of conduct 
is de-certified to the VA immediately upon suspension. To be re-certified the veteran or 
eligible person must be readmitted to Barton College through the channels provided for 
the purpose of reviewing such cases. 



56 / Academic Information 

GRADE APPEAL 

A student who feels a grade has been incorrectly assigned may appeal a final course 
grade in the following steps: 

1 . The student must talk with the instructor to state carefully and precisely why the 
grade given is considered incorrect. An attempt should be made in this conference to 
resolve the issue. If the instructor is not available on the campus (especially during the 
summer), the student should talk with the Chair of the instructor's department or the 
Dean of the College. 

2. If no resolution of the grade can be made in conference with the instructor assigning 
the grade, the student may initiate a formal written appeal process with the Department 
Chair for the purpose of mediation. In the case where the instructor in question is the 
Chair, the second step in the appeal is the Dean of the College. The Department Chair 
shall not have the authority to change a course grade. 

This written appeal will form the basis for a conference between the Chair, the student 
and the instructor. The written appeal must state in detail the reasons for appealing the 
grade and must be presented in four copies - one for the Chair, the instructor, the Dean 
of the College, and the student. Since the document is of primary importance, the stu- 
dent may seek assistance in preparing it for presentation. Any student or member of 
the college community may assist the student in preparing the written appeal. The for- 
mal written process must begin within 60 days of the mailing of grades by the 
Registrar's Office. The student is responsible for informing the Registrar of his/her cor- 
rect current mailing address. Not receiving the grade report because of a wrong 
address will not serve to alter the 60 day limitation. (The Dean of the College shall have 
the right to extend the 60 day deadline under special circumstances.) 

3. If the conference between the Department Chair, the student and the instructor 
does not satisfactorily resolve the issue, the student or the instructor in question may 
request a conference with the Dean of the College for the purpose of mediation. The 
Dean of the College shall not have the authority to change a course grade. 

4. If the Dean of the College agrees with the instructor and the Department Chair after 
a conference with the student, then the student has no case. If there is not a unani- 
mous agreement, then the student or instructor may request the Dean of the College to 
convene an ad hoc Grade Appeal Committee to hear the issue. 

5. The ad hoc Grade Appeal Committee shall be composed of five persons. The stu- 
dent shall select one teaching faculty member; the instructor shall select one teaching 
faculty member; the Dean of the College, after determining their impartiality, shall 
select three teaching faculty members not teaching in the department involved. One of 
the latter of the three persons chosen by the Dean shall be selected by the Committee 
to serve as Chair. 

6. The ad hoc Committee shall hear the testimony of both the student and the faculty 
member and shall guarantee each the right to hear the other's testimony. An audio 
tape shall be made of the hearing proceedings. Upon request to the Dean of the 
College and payment of costs for a copy, a copy of the audio tape will be made avail- 
able to either party. If the student or the instructor fails to appear at a scheduled ses- 
sion of the Committee and fails within seven days to provide satisfactory explanation to 
the Chair for the absence, that person shall be considered to have waived his/her right 
to further consideration. 

Acting with authority from the College Board of Trustees through the President, the 
Grade Appeal Committee may rule to maintain the grade as originally assigned or to 
alter the grade upward or downward. The ruling of the Grade Appeal Committee shall 
be final. 



Academic Information / 57 



During all the formal proceedings, beginning with item two of this procedure, both the 
instructor and the student are entitled to the following due process rights: 

1 . To be present at all formal hearing proceedings. 

2. To be represented by an advisor. Any party may seek from within the college com- 
munity of students, faculty, administrators, and staff a person willing to act as an 
advisor to assist him/her. Lawyers may not represent parties in these proceedings. 

3. To cross examine the witnesses. 

The records of the Committee shall be on file in the Office of the Dean of the College 
for five years. Only the President, the Dean of the College, and Board of Trustees shall 
have access to the records. Members of the Committee shall observe strict confiden- 
tiality regarding the case. 

The entire formal proceedings shall be completed within 60 days. 

GRADE REPORTS 

Grade reports of students who are 24 years of age or younger, with the exception of 
Lifelong Education students, will be mailed to parents or guardians at the home 
address unless the student has established an independent status. We understand 
"independent" to be one who is not claimed as a dependent by one's parents or 
guardians in filing an income tax return. To establish independent status the student 
must file a "Declaration of Independent Status Form" with the Registrar's Office by the 
last day for adding courses for the semester. Declaration of Independent Status Forms 
may be obtained from the Registrar's Office. 

Grade reports for students declared independent, students over 24 years of age and 
students enrolled in Lifelong Education will be mailed to the student at his or her home 
address. 

GRADE TRANSCRIPTS 

A transcript reflects the student's complete academic record. Requests for a copy of 
the transcript should be made to the Office of the Registrar. Transcripts are not issued 
without the permission of the student. Transcripts are not issued for a student who has 
a financial obligation to Barton College. 

SUMMER SESSIONS 

The Summer Sessions are an integral part of the college program. They offer freshmen 
courses for students who wish to begin their college career in May or June, undergrad- 
uate courses for secondary and elementary school teachers and a variety of courses 
for students who wish to expedite their program. 

High school students, upon application to Barton College and with the approval of the 
high school principal, may be accepted to take credit hours in summer sessions. The 
applicants should have completed the PSAT or the SAT with scores in the upper half of 
the national norms for college bound students and/or rank in the upper quarter of their 
class. 

A bulletin of the Summer Sessions and other information will be furnished upon 
request. 

SUMMER COURSEWORK AT OTHER COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 

Students wishing to enroll in summer coursework at other institutions must have the 
prior approval of their advisor (or the Chair of their major department); the Chair of the 
Barton department in which coursework is to be taken if it falls outside the major 
department; and the Registrar. A Petition Request Form with appropriate information 
and signatures must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar before enrolling in sum- 
mer coursework elsewhere. 



58 /Academic Information 



OFFICE OF LIFELONG EDUCATION 

Barton College maintains the office of Lifelong Education for the benefit of students 
who are able to advance their education only on a part-time basis; who are not able to 
attend traditional day classes; who can uniquely be served by the College at an off- 
campus site; who for professional and vocational reasons must continue their educa- 
tion in either credit or non-credit courses; and who can benefit from the cultural, social, 
and educational offerings of the College. Lifelong Education offerings include evening 
and day, off-campus, public service, and community arts programs. The Office also 
offers a Weekend College. Refer to "Weekend College" of this section for additional 
details. Full details of all the programs may be obtained from the Office of Lifelong 
Education. 

Students 

Lifelong Education applicants meet the regular college admissions requirements and 
are subject to academic rules and regulations applicable to traditional students. In 
some cases, an applicant may not meet the admissions requirements of Barton 
College and can be considered for probationary admission. For further information, see 
"Probationary Admission." Students may enroll for credit or non-credit. If the student 
elects to move from non-credit to credit during the course of the term, the student must 
complete a credit request form and submit it to the course instructor and to Lifelong 
Education no later than the date set for dropping a course as passing. The forms are 
available from the Registrar's Office. 

Tuition and Scholarship 

Up to one-half tuition scholarship is available to qualified Lifelong Education partici- 
pants. Lifelong Education students who are enrolled in no more than nine semester 
hours and who have not been enrolled as a full-time student in a traditional four-year 
college or university for at least one academic year normally qualify for the tuition 
scholarship. Any exception to this policy must be approved by the Admissions and 
Financial Aid Committee. 

Lifelong Education registrants may also apply for financial aid as do full-time students. 
Such aid is available on a needs basis. 

Weekend College 

Weekend College is offered through the Office of Lifelong Education to provide an edu- 
cational alternative to men and women 22 years of age or older who work or have other 
commitments and who are unable to pursue the baccalaureate through programs that 
are offered at traditional times during the week. This format is a means by which stu- 
dents may earn a bachelors degree, update or gain skills for professional advance- 
ment, prepare for career change, or pursue personal interests in one or more areas of 
the liberal arts. Degree opportunities in accounting, business administration, communi- 
cations with a business focus, and elementary education (K-6) are available. Classes 
meet once on alternating weekends on either Friday evening, Saturday morning, 
Saturday afternoon, or Sunday afternoon. The tuition reduction applicable to Lifelong 
Education registrants is available to Weekend College students. For full details and 
admissions information, contact the Office of Lifelong Education at 1-919-399-6304 or 
1-800-767-6305. 

BACHELOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES DEGREE 

A Bachelor of Liberal Studies degree program is offered through the Office of Lifelong 
Education. The interdisciplinary degree program is designed for the adult and lifelong 
education student. Extremely flexible, the program provides tracts that may be tailored 



Academic Information / 59 



to meet the personal and professional needs of the individual student. 

To be admitted to the Bachelor of Liberal Studies Degree program, one must: 

1 . Be enrolled in the Office of Lifelong Education and be enrolled in no more than 1 1 
semester hours per semester or have reached his/her 23rd birthday. 

2. Apply to enter the program. 

3. Have a personal interview with Lifelong Education personnel. 

The application will be approved or rejected by the Office of Lifelong Education. If 
rejected, the applicant will be notified in writing stating the reason for the rejection. 

If the application is approved the student will be assigned a primary advisor within the 
Office of Lifelong Education. The student will have a choice of two tracks. One track 
has areas of concentration in two primary departments. The other track has areas of 
concentration in one primary department and in two secondary departments. A depart- 
mental advisor is to be assigned in each department. 

The two primary departments track consists of 24 semester hours in each department 
and 12 semester hours of electives outside the two primary departments 
(24+24+12=60). The three department track consists of 24 semester hours in a primary 
department and 18 semester hours in two secondary departments (24+18+18=60). The 
course selection must be approved by the respective department and the Office of 
Lifelong Education advisor. 

SPECIAL SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES 

A student with a disability needing special services such as course scheduling, classes 
as physically close together as possible, access to library facilities, special readers, 
note takers, or other unusual consideration are requested to notify the Dean of the 
College who will forward the student's name to the Special Services Office. The 
Special Services Office seeks to help the disabled student function comfortably and 
independently as a member of the college community. 

Class Responsibilities. The student is encouraged to discuss, with the instructor as 
soon as possible, any limitations imposed by his/her disability. A disabled student is 
expected to perform to the best ability, to maintain regular class attendance, and to be 
graded on the same basis as a non-disabled student (with appropriate response to the 
disability considered). Faculty and staff members are willing to assist a disabled stu- 
dent when asked. 

Residence Halls. Special arrangements can be made. 

Parking. Parking spaces for handicapped students are available and are located as 
close as possible to campus facilities. In order to use these spaces a student must dis- 
play a handicapped license tag or a handicapped placard. Special handicapped park- 
ing decals are available from the Vice President for Student Life Office. 

College degree requirements and all policies, procedures, and regulations apply to all 
students unless specifically modified by the appropriate college committee or office. 

HONOR CODE 

A student at Barton College is expected to follow an Honor Code which mandates the 
highest standards of academic honesty and personal integrity. According to this code, 
an individual will seek credit and acclaim only for personal academic efforts and 
achievements; serve as an example of academic honesty worthy of emulation and 
commendation; place honor and integrity above all other values; and act, both in word 
and deed, in concert with others toward the end of improving the quality of life for all 
people. "The ultimate improvement of the quality of life, " a goal expressed in the 



60 / Academic Information 



Statement of Purpose in the General Catalog, is directly dependent on the noble aims 
and high ideals of each individual. 

According to the Honor Code, any form of knowing and willful cheating or plagiarism is 
unacceptable, Cheating is defined as the performance of any dishonest and deceptive 
act by which students represent the labor or knowledge of another as their own. 
Plagiarism is defined specifically as the copying of a book or magazine or the work of 
another student without proper acknowledgment. Whenever phrasing is borrowed, 
even if only two or three words, the indebtedness should be recognized by the use of 
quotation marks and mention of the author's name. The language of another is not 
made the writer's own by omission, rearrangement, or new combinations. If writers pre- 
sent this language as their own, they are guilty of plagiarism. 

CATALOG POLICIES 

Each ANNUAL GENERAL CATALOG becomes effective at the opening of the Fall 
Semester. To receive a degree, a student must complete satisfactorily all requirements 
described in the catalog in effect at the time of first enrollment at Barton College. A stu- 
dent who leaves the College or changes to another curriculum for a period of one 
semester or longer and then returns to Barton College or the original curriculum will be 
required to meet the catalog requirements in effect at the time of his/her return. 

In cases of extenuating circumstances, students may request from the Petitions 
Committee a leave without prejudice. Such a request must be made before leaving the 
College for an extended time. If granted, the student may re-enroll at the College under 
the requirements of the General Catalog of original enrollment. 

Courses listed in the catalog are offered at times appropriate for maximum availability 
to students, listings for each semester or term being prepared well in advance. Barton 
College reserves the right to withdraw a course if registration is insufficient to justify 
offering it at the time planned. 

Each student is expected to be aware of the information presented in the catalog, and 
to know whether he/she has met qualitative and quantitative requirements for a particu- 
lar class rank and is progressing properly toward graduation. All students should check 
their record with their advisor periodically to confirm their academic standing. Barton 
College does not assume responsibility for the student's unexpected last minute failure 
to meet all requirements for graduation, whether it is due to misunderstanding or negli- 
gence concerning those requirements or inability to meet them. 

ACCESS TO STUDENT EDUCATIONAL RECORDS 

The Barton College policy for the administration of student educational records is in 
accordance with the provisions of the Family Educational and Privacy Act of 1974 (P.L. 
93-380). The Family Educational and Privacy Act of 1974 governs access to records 
maintained by certain educational institutions and agencies and the release of such 
records. 

Educational records maintained by the College are: The Office of the Registrar main- 
tains an academic record and a personal folder for each student and a folder for each 
student receiving veterans education benefits. The personal folder contains such items 
as admissions records, transcripts, transfer credit evaluation forms, graduation require- 
ments forms, forms relating to international students, and other documents pertaining 
to students. 

The College Infirmary maintains medical records for each student. 
The Office of the Registrar maintains all records of students receiving veterans bene- 
fits. 



Academic Information / 61 



Barton College has established the following policy regarding confidentiality of student 
information: 

1. The Privacy Act stipulates that only a limited amount of information may be 
released from the student record (see Directory Information) without the permission 
of the student. However, in the case of a dependent student, information may be 
released to the parent(s) or guardian(s) of that student. A dependent student in this 
situation is defined as one who is claimed as an exemption by one's parent(s) or 
guardian(s) in filing a United States Income Tax Return. The College assumes that 
full-time students under the age of 21 years are dependent unless they have on file 
in the Registrar's Office a "Declaration of Independent Status Form." Declaration of 
Independent Status Forms are provided at the time of registration and must be filed 
by the deadline stated on the form itself in order for a student to establish indepen- 
dent status. 

2. Parents and guardians of dependent students and students will be informed of their 
rights concerning student educational records annually in the General Catalog of 
the College. 

3. Students have the right to inspect and review their official educational records, 
files, and data maintained by the College and directly related to the student. 
Requests for inspection or review of the student folder must be submitted in writing 
to the Registrar's Office. The College will comply with the request as early as possi- 
ble and in any event no later than forty-five days after the request is made. A stu- 
dent who believes that his or her record or folder contains inaccuracies or mislead- 
ing information has the right to request a correction or to a hearing to challenge 
such information and have it removed from the record or folder or to have included 
in the file a statement of his or her explanation. Complaints concerning the content 
of student records or folders should be directed to the Registrar or to the Vice 
President for Student Life. 

4. A student's folder will be allowed outside the Registrar's Office only to the 
President, the Dean of the College, or the Vice President for Student Life. 
According to policy, all folders checked out of the Registrar's Office should be 
returned within a week from the check-out date unless circumstances prevent such 
return, at which time the Registrar's Office must be notified. 

5. Transcripts contained in the folder from other institutions will not be returned to the 
student nor sent elsewhere at his or her request except in exceptional cases when 
another transcript is unobtainable or can be secured only with great difficulty (as is 
sometimes true with foreign records). When transcripts from other institutions are 
released to prevent undue hardship to the student, the transcript copy should be 
noted as being a copy of the original on file at the College. 

6. Transcripts are released only upon written request of the student. Transcripts will 
not be released if the student is financially indebted to the College. 

7. The College will not release any information from student records to anyone 
(except those noted below in Item 9) without the written consent of the student. 

8. Grade reports will be sent to the parent(s) or guardian(s) at the home address 
unless the student has established an independent status by filing the "Declaration 
of Independent Status Form" in the Registrar's Office or unless the student is 
enrolled in the Lifelong Education Office of the College. In the case of independent 
students and students enrolled in the Office of Lifelong Education, grade reports will 
be sent to the student at his or her home address. 

9. Information from student records may be released without the written consent of the 
student in the following situation: 

a) In compliance with a court order or subpoena provided the student is 
notified of such orders or subpoenas by the College prior to compliance. 

b) To faculty or staff of the College for advising purposes or carrying out adminis- 
trative duties. 



62 /Academic Information 



c) To other departments, accrediting agencies, philanthropic organizations or edu- 
cation agencies who have a legitimate educational interest in the information. 

d) To appropriate institutions such as high schools and other educational institu- 
tions seeking to study the records of their former students, the semester grade 
report(s) is released as an institutional courtesy. Also, requests from national- 
ly organized research organizations making statistical studies may be honored 
without prior approval of the student, provided no information revealing the stu- 
dent's name is published. 

e) To parents of dependent students. 

f ) To appropriate persons in connection with an emergency if the information 
is necessary to protect the health or safety of the person or other persons. 

10. Academic and/or personal information other than that shown under "Directory 
Information" will not be released without the student's prior written permission to 
local, state, or federal governmental agencies (such as F.B.I. , S.B.I., police officers, 
Military Intelligence, etc.) unless legally subpoenaed. If information is subpoenaed, 
the student will be notified of this legal action in advance of compliance. 

1 1 . No permission for conducting research using data from student's records or folder 
will be granted. The only research that will be permitted will be that designated by 
the Dean of the College or the President. 

DIRECTORY INFORMATION 

It is the policy of Barton College to make certain directory information available. The 
policy is for the convenience of students and the general public and is in compliance 
with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. 

Directory information that may be released is defined as student's name, home and 
local address, local phone number, classification, advisor's name, date and place of 
birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized sports and activities, 
weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and 
awards received, most recent previous educational institution attended by the student, 
and religious affiliation. Students who do not wish any or all directory information 
released must complete a Directory Information Withhold Form. Obtain the form from 
the Registrar's Office. The form must be completed and returned to the Registrar's 
Office by the end of the fall semester drop-add period. The withhold request will be in 
effect for one academic year. 

Students should provide parents, employees, etc. with copies of their class schedule. 
Class schedules will not be released except in cases of emergency. 



Academic Information / 63 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS: MAJORS AND MINORS 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Biology: *B.A. and *B.S. degrees; minor. 

Cell Biology: B.S. degree. 

Chemistry: B.A. and B.S. degrees; minor. 

Environmental Science: B.S. degree. 

General Science: B.A. degree. 

Medical Technology: B.S. degree. 
BUSINESS PROGRAMS 

Accounting: B.S. degree; minor. 

Business Administration: B.S. degree; minor. 

Economics: minor. 
COMMUNICATION, PERFORMING AND VISUAL ARTS 

Art (Studio): B.A., B.F.A., and B.S. degrees; minor. 

Art Education: B.S. degree. 

Communications: B.A. and B.S. degrees; minor. 

Drama: minor. 

Music: B.A. degree, minor. 

Music Education: B.S. degree. 

Music Recording Technology: B.S. degree. 
EDUCATION 

Elementary Education (Kindergarten through grade 6): B.S. degree. 

Middle School Education (grades 6 through grade 9): B.S. degree. 

Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing 
(Kindergarten through grade 12): B.S. degree. 
ENGLISH AND MODERN LANGUAGES 

English: *B.A. degree; minor. 

French: *B.A. degree; minor. 

Spanish: *B.A. degree; minor. 
HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCES, AND SOCIAL WORK 

American Studies: B.A. and B.S. degrees; minor. 

Geography: minor. 

History: B.A. degree; minor. 

International Studies: B.A. degree. 

Political Science: B.A. and B.S. degrees; minor. 

Social Studies: *B.A. and *B.S. degrees. 

Social Work: B.S. degree. 
MATHEMATICS 

Computer Science: minor. 

Mathematics: *B.A. and *B.S. degrees; minor. 
NURSING 

Nursing: B.S. degree. 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS STUDIES 

Physical Education: B.S. degree (Teacher Certification); minor. 

Sports Management: B.S. degree. 

Sports Science: B.S. degree. 
PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology: B.A. and B.S. degrees. 

Psychology/Business: B.S. degree. 
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY 

Religion and Philosophy: B.A. degree; minor. 

*Degree program available with or without a teacher certification program. 



64 / Biological and Physical Sciences 
COURSE NUMBERS AND CREDITS 



001 -009 Music Lessons 200-299 Sophomore-Level Courses 

01 1 -099 Multi-Level Courses 300-399 Junior-Level Courses 

100-199 Freshman-Level Courses 400-499 Senior-Level Courses 

Multi-, junior-, and senior-level courses are designated as upper-level. 

Courses offered by each department are listed in this section of the catalog. The follow- 
ing order used for each listing: Three-letter discipline designator, three-digit course 
number, course title, course credit in semester hours, description of course content, 
prerequisites, notes with other important information, semester when course is normal- 
ly offered. 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Professors: Brugh, Kilgore, Witherington (Chair) 
Associate Professor: Graham, Moore 
Assistant Professor: Demchick, Kolunie 

Student Organization: Science Club. 

Note: Each set of double course numbers represents a lecture course/laboratory 
course combination. The credit hours for each course in the requirements are listed in 
the parentheses. 

BIOLOGY MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Biology courses: BIO *1 01/1 03 (3/1), *1 02/1 04 (3/1), 201/203 (3/1), 206/208 (3/1). 

• Chemistry courses: CHE 151/153 (3/1), 152/154 (3/1), 311/313 (3/1), 312/314 (3/1). 

• Physical course: PHY 130/131 (3/1). 

• Mathematics courses: MAT *231 (3). 

• Biology electives (8): choose two lecture and laboratory combinations from BIO 
201/211 (3/1), 302/304 (3/1), 303/305 (3/1), 306/308 (1/3), 307/309 (1/3), 315/317 
(3/7J 318/320 (3/7,), 319/321 (3/1). 

• A cognate area of study consists of at least 18 hours of courses outside the 
Department of Biological and Physical Sciences. These may, or may not, be restrict- 
ed to any single department. The student and advisor assemble a sequence of 
courses constituting a logically related area of concentration. The cognate area of 
study must be developed and approved prior to the end of the sophomore year. For 
students entering the major after the sophomore year the cognate area must be 
developed during the first semester in the major. 

Total: 65 semester hours; *11 hours of these fulfill the general college core require- 
ments in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 

BIOLOGY MAJOR (B.A.)/TEACHER CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: 

• Biology courses: BIO *1 01/1 03 (3/1), *1 02/1 04 (3/1), 206/208 (3/1), 318/320 (3/1), 
and eight semester hours of Biology electives. 

• Chemistry courses: CHE 151/153 (3/1), 152/154 (3/1), 311/313 (3/1). 

• Physics courses: PHY 130/131 (3/1). 

• Mathematics course: MAT *231 (3). 

• Earth Science courses: SCI 102 (2). If comprehensive science certification is desired 
the following additional courses must be included: PHY 1 32/1 33 (3/1), SCI 301 (4), 
and one additional hour of an earth science related course. 

Total: 45 semester hours (54 for comprehensive science certification); *11 hours of 

these fulfill the general college core requirements in The Natural Sciences and 

Mathematics. 

In addition, the student must complete the following requirements for Teacher 

Certification: 



Biological and Physical Sciences / 65 



• Courses in the general college core requirements prescribed for Secondary Teacher 
Certification: HIS 202 (3); POL 201 (3); PSY 223 (3). 

• Professional Education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Semester: EDU 201 (3) and 458 (3); ENG 363 (3); PSY 323 

(3) and 483 (3). 

During the Professional Semester (Spring): EDU 443 (2), 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 (6). 

• Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0), 033 (0), 044 (0). 

• Complete all Entrance Criteria requirements (listed below): 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional education 
course. Only the student who successfully completes all phases of the Entrance 
Criteria Program and meets all other department requirements can be permitted to 
enter pre-service teaching. See the section on Science Education for descriptions of 
the following topics: Secondary Science Comprehensive Certification Guidelines (9- 
12); Secondary Specific Science Area Certification Guidelines (9-12); Secondary 
Science Endorsement Requirements (9-12); and the Entrance Criteria Program. 

BIOLOGY MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Biology courses: BIO *1 01/1 03 (3/1), *1 02/1 04 (1/3) 201/203 (3/1), 210 (2), 211 (2), 
315/317 (3/7 J, 410 (%). 

• Choose one group: Animal Group BIO 302/304 (3/1) and 303/305 (3/1), or Plant 
Group 306/308 (3/1) and 307/309 (3/1). 

• Biology electives (8): two 300- or 400-level courses. 

• Chemistry courses: CHE 151/153 (3/1), 152/154 (3/1), 311/313 (3/1), 312/314 (3/1). 

• Physics courses: PHY 130/131 (3/1). 

• Mathematics courses: MAT *106 (or *109) (3), and 231 (3). 

Total: 63 semester hours; *1 1 hours of these fulfill the general college core require- 
ments in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 

BIOLOGY MAJOR (B.S.)/TEACHER CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: 

• Biology courses specified: BIO *1 01/1 03 (3/1), *1 02/1 04 (3/1), 201/203 (3/1), 210 (2), 
211 (2), 315/317 (3/1). 

• Choose one group: Animal Group BIO 302/304 (3/1) and 303/305 (3/1), or Plant 
Group 306/308 (3/1) and 307/309 (3/1). 

• Biology electives: Choose 8 semester hours. 

• Chemistry courses: CHE 151/153 (3/1), 152/154 (3/1), 311/313 (3/1), 312/314 (3/1). 

• Physics courses: PHY 130/131 (3/1). 

• Mathematics courses; MAT *106 (or *109) (3), and 231 (3). 

• Earth Science courses: SCI 102 (2). If comprehensive science certification is desired 
the following additional courses must be included: PHY 132/133 (3/1), SCI 301 (4), 
and one additional hour of an earth science related course. 

Total: 64 semester hours (73 for comprehensive science certification); *11 hours of 

these fulfill the general college core requirements in The Natural Sciences and 

Mathematics. 

In addition, the student must complete the following requirements for Teacher 

Certification: 

• Courses in the general college core requirements prescribed for Secondary Teacher 
Certification: HIS 202 (3); POL 201 (3); PSY 223 (3). 

• Professional education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Semester: EDU 201 (3) and 458 (2); ENG 363 (3); PSY 323 

(3) and 483 (3); SCI 459 (2). 

During the Professional Semester (Spring): EDU 443 (2), 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 (6). 

• Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0), 033 (0), 044 (0). 

• Complete all Entrance Criteria requirements. 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional education 
course. Only the student who successfully completes all phases of the Entrance 






66 / Biological and Physical Sciences 

Criteria Program and meets all other department requirements can be permitted to 
enter pre-service teaching. See the section on Science Education for descriptions of 
the following topics: Secondary Science Comprehensive Certification Guidelines (9- 
12); Secondary Specific Science Area Certification Guidelines (9-12); Secondary 
Science Endorsement Requirements (9-12); and the Entrance Criteria Program. 

CELL BIOLOGY MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Biology courses: BIO •101/103 (3/1), *1 02/1 04 (3/1), 201/203 (3/1), 206/208 (3/1) 
210 (2), 211 (2), 315/317 (3/1). 

• Chemistry courses: CHE 151/153 (3/1), 152/154 (3/1), 311/313 (3/1), 312/314 (3/1), 
327/329 (3/1), 340/342 (3/1). 

• Physics course: PHY 130/131 (3/1). 

• Elective courses: four hours in the biological and physical sciences. 

• Mathematics courses: choose two from MAT *106 (or *109) (3), or *231 (3). 
Total: 58 semester hours; *11 hours of these fulfill the general college core require- 
ments in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 

BIOLOGY MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Biology courses: eighteen hours. 
Total: 18 semester hours. 

CHEMISTRY MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Chemistry courses: CHE *151/153 (3/1), M52/154 (3/1), 300/301 (3/1), 311/313 
(3/1), 312/314 (3/1), 400 (3), 401 (2). 

• Biology course: BIO 101/103 (3/1). 

• Choose one lecture/laboratory combination from BIO 102/104 (3/1), 201/203 (3/1) 
206/208 (3/1), or CHE 327/329 (3/1). 

• Physics courses: PHY 130/131 (3/1), 132/133 (3/1). 

• Mathematics courses: MAT *109 (3). 

Total: 44 semester hours; *11 hours of these fulfill the general college core require- 
ments in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 

CHEMISTRY MAJOR (B.A.)ZTEACHER CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: 

• Chemistry courses: CHE *1 51/1 53 (3/1), *1 52/1 54 (3/1), 300/301 (3/1), 311/313 
(3/1), 312/314 (3/1), 327/329 (3/1), 400 (3), 401 (2). 

• Biology courses: BIO 101/103 (3/1); 102/104 (3/1) or 206/208 (3/1). 

• Physics courses: phy 130/131 (3/1), 439 (4). 

• Mathematics course: MAT *109 (3). 

• Earth Science courses: SCI 102 (2). If comprehensive science certification is desired 
the following additional courses must be included: SCI 301 (4) and one additional 
hour of an earth science related course. 

Total: 54 semester hours (59 for comprehensive science certification); *11 hours of 

these fulfill the general college core requirements in The Natural Sciences and 

Mathematics. 

In addition, the student must complete the following requirements for Teacher 

Certification: 

• Courses in the general college core requirements prescribed for Secondary Teacher 
Certification: HIS 202 (3); POL 201 (3); PSY 223 (3). 

• Professional Education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Semester: EDU 201 (3) and 458 (2); ENG 363 (3); PSY 323 

(3) and 483 (3); SCI 459 (2). 

During the Professional Semester (Spring): EDU 442 (2), 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 (6). 

• Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0), 033 (0), 044 (4). 

• Complete all Entrance Criteria requirements: 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional education 
course. Only the student who successfully completes all phases of the Entrance 






Biological and Physical Sciences / 67 



Criteria Program and meets all other department requirements can be permitted to 
enter pre-service teaching. See the section on Science Education for descriptions of 
the following topics: Secondary Science Comprehensive Certification Guidelines (9- 
12); Secondary Specific Science Area Certification Guidelines (9-12); Secondary 
Science Endorsement Requirements (9-12); and the Entrance Criteria Program. 

CHEMISTRY MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Chemistry courses: CHE *1 51/1 53 (3/1), *1 52/1 54 (1/3), 300/301 (3/1) 311/313 (3/1), 
312/314 (3/1), 327/329 (3/1), 400 (3), 401 (2), 421 (3), 450 (3), 451 (2). 

• Biology courses: BIO 101/103 (3/1). 

• Physics courses: PHY 130/131 (3/1), 132/133 (3/1). 

• Mathematics course: MAT *209 (3). 

Total: 52 semester hour; *1 1 hours of these fulfill the general college core requirements 
in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 

CHEMISTRY MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Chemistry courses: CHE 151/153 (3/1), 152/154 (3/1), 300/301 (3/1), and 311/313 
(3/1). 

Total: 16 semester hours. 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Biology courses: BIO *1 01/1 03 (3/1), *1 02/1 04 (3/1), 201/203 (3/1), 206/208 (3/1), 
318/320 (3/1), 402/403 (3/1). 

• Chemistry courses: CHE 151/153 (3/1), 200/201 (3/1), 300/301 (3/1). 

• Physics course: PHY 130/131 (3/1). 

• Mathematics courses: MAT «1 06 (3), 231 (3). 

Total: 46 semester hours: *11 hours of these fulfill the general college core require- 
ments in The Natural Science and Mathematics. 

GENERAL SCIENCE MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Biology courses: BIO *1 01/1 03 (3/1), *1 02/1 04 (3/1). 

• Chemistry courses: CHE 151/153 (3/1), and either 152/154 (3/1) or 200/201 (3/1). 

• Physics course: PHY 130/131 (3/1). 

• Mathematics course: MAT *231 (3). 

• Choose four semester hours from two of the following discipline lists: 

Biology list: BIO 206/208 (3/1), 219 (4), 302/304 (3/1), 303/305 (3/1), 306/308 

(3/1), 307/309 (3/1). 
Chemistry list: CHE 300/301 (3/1). 
Physics list: PHY 132/133 (3/1), 230 (4). 

• Elective courses (8): choose eight semester hours from 300-, 400-, or multi-level 
courses in Biology or in Chemistry. Choose courses only from one of these disci- 
plines. 

• General Science course: SCI 400 (3). 

• Cognate area of study (18). See description in Biology Major (B.S.) Requirements. 
Total: 60 semester hours; *1 1 hours of these fulfill the general college core require- 
ments in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

The College offers a variety of options any student wishing to pursue a career in 
Medical Technology: 

2 + 2 Plan: A student attends the College for their first two years and then transfers to 
East Carolina University or the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for two 
years of professional education. The degree is granted by the institution to which the 
student transfers. A student must meet the general education and cognate require- 
ments of the university to which they transfer. The Medical Technology Advisor 
should be consulted about specific courses. 



68 / Biological and Physical Sciences 



3 + 1 Plan: A student attends Barton College for three years and then enters an affiliat- 
ed one-year hospital-based Medical Technology program in one of the North 
Carolina's metropolitan areas. Upon completion of the clinical program, credit is 
transferred back to Barton and Barton College which then grants the degree. At 
Barton the student must complete the general college core and professional prereq- 
uisites before transferring. 

• Chemistry courses: CHE *151/153 (3/1), *152/154 (1/3), 300/301 (3/1), 311/313 
(3/1), 327/329 (3/1). 

• Biology courses: BIO 101/103 (3/1), 206/208 (3/1), 31 1/313 (3/1), 312/314 (3/1). 

• Psychology course: PSY 223 (3). 

• Business course (3): choose either MGT 364 (3) or 366 (3). 

• Mathematics courses (6): choose two from MAT *106 (3), *109 (3), or *231 (3). 
Total: 48 semester hours; *eight hours of these may count toward the general college 
core requirements in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 

4 + 1 Plan: Hospital-based programs may accept students with a bachelor's degree in 
virtually any field, as long as certain science and mathematics prerequisites are met. 
Generally, the minimum requirements are sixteen hours of Biology, including microbi- 
ology and immunology (may be included in the microbiology course); sixteen hours 
of chemistry, including organic; and one semester of college algebra. Survey courses 
that do not count towards a biology or chemistry major cannot be used to satisfy this 
requirement. In order to provide the student with the scientific background essential 
to success in Medical Technology, it is recommended that students select one of the 
following options: 

Option 1 : 

• Complete the degree requirements for the B.S. degree in Biology. 

• Additional Biology lecture/laboratory combination: BIO 206/208 (3/1). 

• Additional Chemistry lecture/laboratory combination: CHE 300/301 (3/1). 
Option 2: 

• Complete the degree requirements for the B.S. degree in Chemistry. 

• Additional Biology lecture/laboratory combinations: BIO 101/103 (3/1), 206/208 (3/ 
1), and eight additional semester hours of Biology [BIO 31 1/313 (3/1) and 312/314 
(3/10)] are strongly recommended. 

A Medical Technology major is encouraged to contact the Medical Technology Advisor 
early in the academic year preceding the year of transfer to the affiliated clinical pro- 
gram. Declaring Medical Technology as one's major does not guarantee admission into 
a professional program since admission is competitive, and is usually based on grade 
point average, references, and a personal interview. During the senior-level clinical 
year, the student is expected to abide by the regulations of the affiliated institution. 
Failure to comply with program rules may result in dismissal. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 
Pre-Medical, Pre-Dentistry, Pre-Veterinary Advisement 

The student planning to enter a medical, dental, or veterinary school normally would 
pursue a degree in Biology or Chemistry with additional coursework in Physics (8 
semester hours) and Calculus (one course). In addition the student should take a for- 
eign language, some elective courses in the Humanities, and have a major. 

A committee composed of physicians, dentists, and veterinarians serves as an adviso- 
ry and recommendation group for the Department and for student desiring to enter a 
medical profession. The student appears before the committee at its December or April 
meeting. The committee reviews the student's academic progress. The student is 
required to sign appropriate release of information forms. 



Biological and Physical Sciences / 69 



Application to enter the program may be made no sooner than the second semester of 
the sophomore year and no later than the first semester of the junior year. The first 
interview is held the semester following application. After the first interview, the student 
is interviewed each succeeding semester until a recommendation is forthcoming. 

If a student is recommended for admission to a medical school, the recommendation is 
submitted over the signatures of the entire committee. If a negative decision is made 
no recommendation is forthcoming. 

It is advantageous for the student desiring admission to a medical school to participate 
in the advisory program. The lack of a recommendation does not restrict the student 
from applying to the medical school of choice. After admission into the advisory pro- 
gram, the student may withdraw as a participant at any time. Participation or lack of 
participation in the program does not preclude the faculty from making recommenda- 
tions, collectively or individually, if requested by the student. 

Pre-Pharmacy Advisement 

Students should spend two or three years at the College and then transfer to a phar- 
macy school. Courses listed under the general college requirements are generally 
accepted, although the requirements will vary for specific pharmacy schools. The fol- 
lowing courses should be considered: 

• Biology courses: BIO •101/103, •102/104, 206/208. 

• Chemistry courses: CHE 151/153, 152/154, 311/313, 312/314. 

• Physics courses: PHY 1 30/1 31 , 1 32/1 33. 

• Mathematics course: choose one of MAT 106, 209, 231 . 

Many students elect to complete a major in Biology or Chemistry before entering phar- 
macy school. 

Earning a Barton College B.A. Degree After Entering Professional School 

The Department recommends that students who are accepted into a professional 
school after three years of study at Barton College should be awarded the B.A. degree 
in either Biology or Chemistry after successfully completing one year at a professional 
school. The student is required to complete all of the requirements for the degree. The 
year of full-time professional courses are transferred to Barton College as 32 semester 
hours. Grades earned in the professional school are used in calculating grade point 
average for honors, etc. The following types of professional programs are included in 
this program: DENTISTRY, MEDICINE, OPTOMETRY, PHARMACY, PODIATRY, AND 
VETERINARY MEDICINE. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION 

For specific course requirements see above for the listings under BIOLOGY MAJOR 
(B.A.)/TEACHER CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS, BIOLOGY MAJOR (B.S.)/ 
TEACHER CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS, and CHEMISTRY (B.A.)/TEACHER 
CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS. 

Secondary (9-12) Specific Science Area Certification 

To be certified in a specific science area at the secondary level, a teacher must have a 
concentration in one, and additional work in another, of the four science areas (biology, 
chemistry, physics, and earth science). No certification in physical science is available. 
A teacher should be able to achieve the necessary competencies by completing at 
least 24 hours in one science area and at least 12 hours in another science area. 
These 12 hours may be obtained by completing courses in more than one science 
area. However, it may be advantageous to complete these 12 hours in one science 



70 / Biological and Physical Sciences 



area only. Twelve hours in one science area, coupled with the 24 hours in the science 
area of concentration, may be counted as an endorsement in that science area. A 
teacher certified in one of the four science areas is eligible to teach full-time in that area 
in grades 9-12. A teacher having 12 hours in another of the science areas may teach 
up to half-time in that area in grades 9-12. 

Secondary (9-12) Science Endorsement 

To be endorsed in only one science area at the secondary level, a teacher must have a 
concentration in one of the four science areas (biology, chemistry, physics, earth sci- 
ence). A teacher should be able to achieve the necessary competencies by completing 
at least 18 hours in the endorsed science area. A teacher with an endorsement in a sci- 
ence area is eligible to teach up to half-time in that area in grades 9-12. An exception 
occurs when the teacher has an endorsement in chemistry or physics (or with a com- 
bined total of 18 hours in chemistry and physics). The teacher in this exceptional case 
may teach physical science on a full-time basis. 

Endorsement Requirements 

Biology when accompanied by certification in a non-science discipline: BIO 101/103 
(3/1), 102/104 (3/1); plus 10 semester hours to be selected from the following: BIO 
201/203 (3/1), 211 (2), 219 (4), 302/304 (3/1), 303/305 (3/1), 306/308 (3/1), 307/309 
(3/1). Total: 18 semester hours. 

Biology when accompanied by certification in chemistry: BIO 101/103 (3/1), 102/104 
(3/1); plus 4 semester hours to be selected from the following: BIO 201/203 (3/1), 211 
(2), 219 (4), 302/304 (3/1), 303/305 (3/1), 306/308 (3/1), 307/309 (3/1). Total: 12 
semester hours. 

Chemistry when accompanied by certification in a non-science discipline: CHE 151/153 
(3/1), 152/154 (3/1), 300/301 (3/1), 311/313 (3/1). Total: 16 semester hours. 

Chemistry when accompanied by certification in biology: CHE 151/153 (3/1), 152/154 
(3/1), 31 1/313 (3/1). Total: 12 semester hours. 

Physics when accompanied by certification in a science area: PHY 130/131 (3/1), 
132/133 (3/1), 320 (4). Total 12 semester hours. 

Entrance Criteria Program 

The Entrance Criteria Program (ECP) is designed to screen candidates for teacher cer- 
tification. This program requires data to demonstrate that the candidate possesses the 
necessary competencies to be an effective teacher. There are specific time constraints 
on some of the requirements. The student is responsible for complying with all ECP 
guidelines. The student must successfully complete: 

Phase I: To be completed by the end of the Sophomore Year. 
SAT Scores on file 
Strong Interest Inventory 
Declaration of Major 

EDU 01 1 Practicum and EDU 022 Practicum 
Laboratory Assistant (one semester) 
NTE Core Battery I and Core Battery II 
Probability of Success Form 
Program Projection 

Student Advisement Document (Part A) 
Interview for Candidacy 
2.50 GPA on all courses attempted 
Application to Teacher Education: Admission to Candidacy for certification is con 



Biological and Physical Sciences / 71 



tingent on successful completion of Phase I requirements. Upon admission to 
candidacy, a student may then register for upper-level (300-400) education 
courses. 
Phase II: To be completed by the end of the Junior Year 

EDU 033 Practicum 

2.50 GPA on all course work attempted, all courses in the major (including all sci- 
ence and mathematics courses), and on all professional education courses 

Application for Student Teaching 

Student Advisement Document (Part B) 
Phase III: To be completed by the end of the Senior Year 

EDU 044 Teaching Skills Laboratory 

Departmental Recommendation for Student teaching 

Student Teaching (minimum grade of "C") 

NTE Core Battery III Professional Knowledge and Teaching Specialty 

Student Advisement Document (Part C) 

Application for Certification 

Courses of Instruction: BIOLOGY 

BIO 011. PLANTS AND ANIMALS OF THE NORTH CAROLINA COAST AND ESTU- 
ARIES: HABITATS AND DIVERSITY. 3. A field study of the distribution and adapta- 
tions of plants and animals in the coastal rivers, sounds, barrier islands of the North 
Carolina coast. Involves daily field trips for observations and collections. Topics 
include coastal geology, landforms, estuarine processes and the dynamics and 
adaptive features of estuarine and marine organisms. Prerequisites: None, but 
some prior study and understanding of plant and animal taxonomy is presumed. 
Notes: Counts toward the general college core requirements in The Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics. Limited enrollment open only by permission of instructor. 
Summer only. 

BIO 012. PLANTS AND ANIMALS OF THE NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS: HABI- 
TATS AND DIVERSITY. 3. A field study of the distribution and adaptations of plants 
and animals of the valleys, slopes, streams and ponds of the North Carolina moun- 
tains. Involves daily field trips for observation and collection. Topics include geology 
and orogeny of the Blue Ridge Mountains, wildflowers of the Great Smokies and 
speciation of the Appalachian salamander. Prerequisites: None, but some prior 
study and understanding of plant and animal taxonomy is presumed. Note: Counts 
toward the general college core requirements in The Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics. Evening lectures. Limited enrollment open only by permission of 
instructor. Summer only. 

BIO 101. PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I. 3. An introduction to the concepts and princi- 
ples of biological science; a discussion of the historical development and current 
applications of scientific thought in biology. A survey of life processes and life forms 
which is an introduction to the diverse fields of biological studies. Corerequisite: BIO 
103. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in The Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics. Fall, Spring. 

BIO 102. PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II. 3. Second semester continuation of BIO 101. 
Prerequisite: BIO 101/103. Note: counts toward the general college core require- 
ments in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Fall, Spring. 

BIO 103. PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY LABORATORY I. 1. Introduction in the use of 
basic laboratory techniques and experimental design to the solution of problems. 
Corequisite: BIO 101. Note: One three-hour laboratory period per week. Fall, 
Spring. 



72 / Biological and Physical Sciences 



BIO 104. PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY LABORATORY II. 1. Laboratory that is the sec- 
ond semester continuation of BIO 103. Corequisite: BIO 102. Note: One three-hour 
laboratory period per week. Fall, Spring. 

BIO 105. GENERAL BOTANY. 3. A brief survey of the plant kingdom emphasizing 
the structure and function of the flowering plant. Prerequisite: BIO 101/103. 
Corequisite: BIO 107. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements 
in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Fall. 

BIO 106. GENERAL ZOOLOGY. 3. A survey of the animal kingdom. Prerequisite: 

BIO 101/103. Corequisite: BIO 108. Note: Counts toward the general, college core 
requirements in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Spring. 

BIO 107. GENERAL BOTANY LABORATORY. 1. Laboratory exercises to accompany 
the lectures of General Botany. Corequisite: BIO 105. Note: One three-hour labora- 
tory period per week. Fall. 

BIO 108. GENERAL ZOOLOGY LABORATORY. 1. Laboratory exercises to accompa- 
ny General Zoology. Corequisite: BIO 106. Note: One three-hour laboratory period 
per week. Fall, Spring. 

BIO 201. INTRODUCTORY ECOLOGY. 3. An introduction to ecological principles and 
concepts with emphasis on study of eastern North Carolina ecosystems. 
Prerequisite: BIO 101/103. Corequisite: BIO 203. Fall. 

BIO 203. INTRODUCTORY ECOLOGY LABORATORY. 1. Laboratory exercises to 
accompany Introductory Ecology. Corequisite: BIO 201. Notes: Requires some 
Saturday and Weekend sessions. Four hours per week. Fall. 

BIO 206. INTRODUCTORY MICROBIOLOGY. 3. Classification and physiology of 
microorganisms, harmful and helpful; their relations to health and disease; methods 
of study, cultivation and control; and introduction to immunology emphasizing the 
antigen-antibody reactions including the involvement of the lymph nodes, thymus 
and macrophages in these reactions. Prerequisite: BIO 101/103, CHE 200/201. 
Corequisite: BIO 208. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements 
in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Fall, Spring. 

BIO 208. INTRODUCTORY MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY. 1. Laboratory exercis- 
es to accompany Introductory Microbiology. Corequisite: BIO 206. Note: Four hours 
per week. Fall, Spring. 

BIO 210. MOLECULAR GENETICS . 2. The qualitative study of gene structures and 
the physical and chemical changes occurring in or among them in relation to biologi- 
cal activities. Prerequisite: BIO 101/103. Notes: Three lecture and two laboratory 
hours per week for half a semester. Spring. 

BIO 211. MENDELIAN GENETICS. 2. Application of the molecular principles of genet- 
ics to heredity in plants and animals. Laboratory using biometrical analysis of experi- 
ments with Drosophila. Prerequisite: BIO 210. Note: Three lecture and two labora- 
tory hours per week for half a semester. Spring. 

BIO 219. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 4. A study of the basic structure 
and physiology of human systems. Prerequisite: BIO 101/103. Note: Four lecture 
and two laboratory/discussion/demonstration hours per week. Fall. 

BIO 302. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. 3. A survey of major and selected minor inver- 
tebrate phyla. Prerequisite: BIO 102/104. Corequisite: BIO 304. Fall (odd years). 

BIO 303. VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. 3. A survey of the vertebrates with an emphasis 
on evolution adaptation and classification. Prerequisite: BIO 102/104. Corequisite: 
305. Spring (even years). 



Biological and Physical Sciences / 73 

BIO 304. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY LABORATORY. 1. Laboratory dissection and a 
personal collection required. Corequisite: BIO 302. Notes: Field trips are an integral 
part of course and participation is required. Three laboratory hours per week. Fall 
(odd years). 

BIO 305. VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY LABORATORY. 1. Laboratory emphasis on field 
collecting, identification and natural history of North Carolina species. Corequisite: 
BIO 303. Notes: Field trip participation required. Three laboratory hours per week. 
Spring (even years). 

BIO 306. NONVASCULAR PLANTS. 3. A survey of the lower and higher non-vascular 
plants. Prerequisite: BIO 102/104. Corequisite: BIO 308. Fall (even years). 

BIO 307. VASCULAR PLANTS. 3. A study of the organization of the tissue in the 
lower and higher vascular plants, selected life cycles and a recognition and identifi- 
cation of selected families of the Gymnospermae and Angiospermae. Prerequisite: 
BIO 102/104. Corequisite: BIO 309. Spring (odd years). " 

BIO 308. NONVASCULAR PLANTS LABORATORY. 1. Field collecting, identifying, 
and culturing of selected divisions of plants. Individual experiences requiring collect- 
ing and identifying. Corequisite: BIO 306. Notes: Day and weekend field trips are 
an integral part of the course and participation is required. Three laboratory hours 
per week. Fall (even years). 

BIO 309. VASCULAR PLANTS LABORATORY. 1. Individual experiences requiring 
collecting and identification. Corequisite: BIO 307. Notes: Day and weekend field 
trips are an integral part of course and participation is required. Three laboratory 
hours per week. Spring (odd years). 

BIO 311. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION IN MAN I. 3. A study of the anatomy and 
physiology of the systems in man. Prerequisites: CHE 200/201; BIO 206/208, or 
permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIO 313. Fall. 

BIO 312. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION IN MAN II. 3. Second semester continuation 
of BIO 311. Prerequisite: BIO 311/313. Corequisite: 314. Spring. 

BIO 313. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION IN MAN I LABORATORY. 1. Laboratory 
exercises to accompany Structure and Function in Man I. Corequisite: BIO 311. 
Note: Three laboratory hours per week. Fall. 

BIO 314. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION IN MAN II LABORATORY. 1. Laboratory 
exercises to accompany Structure and Function in Man II. Corequisite: BIO 312. 
Spring. 

BIO 315. CELL BIOLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE. 3. Cell structure, function and 
variety explored. Searching articles in the cell biology literature. Corequisite: BIO 
317. Fall. 

BIO 317. CELL BIOLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE LABORATORY. 1. Observation, 
culturation, and manipulation of cells. Corequisite: BIO 315. Fall. 

BIO 318. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY. 3. An examination of the role of environmen- 
tal factors in the morphological and physiological specializations of living organisms. 
Emphasis on the biotic responses to specific environmental conditions. 
Prerequisite: BIO 102/104. Corequisite: BIO 320. Fall. 

BIO 319. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY. 4. A study of the evolutionary 
development of vertebrates based on a comparative study of homologous anatomi- 
cal features. Prerequisites: BIO 102/104, 303/305. Corequisite: BIO 321. Fall. 

BIO 320. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY. 1. Laboratory studies of spe- 
cific anatomical and physiological characteristics of plants and animals as a rein- 



74 / Biological and Physical Sciences 



forcement of the concept of the environment as a selective force in organic evolution. 
Corequisite: BIO 318. Note: Four laboratory hours per week. Fall. 

BIO 321. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY LABORATORY. 1. Laboratory 
studies that concentrate on Branchiostoma, Squalus, Necturus, and the rabbit or cat. 
Corequisite: BIO 319. Notes: Four laboratory hours per week. Fall. 

BIO 402. METHODS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS AND ASSESSMENT. 3. A 

survey of the theory and practice of sampling and measurement of the physical, 
chemical, and biological components of environments. Emphasis placed on the theo- 
retical and technical aspects of evaluating environmental factors. Prerequisites: BIO 
102/104; CHE 151/153; MAT 231 . Corequisite: BIO 403. 

BIO 403. METHODS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS AND ASSESSMENT LABO- 
RATORY. 1. Laboratory exercises in practical methods and techniques of environ- 
mental measurement. Corequisite: BIO 402. Note: Four laboratory hours per week. 

BIO 404. ANIMAL BEHAVIOR. 3. Course investigates the patterns of behavior among 
a variety of animal species. Includes discussions of the physiological and genetic 
influences on behavior and thorough investigations of specific areas of behavior such 
as communication, reproduction, aggression, and parental behavior. Prerequisites: 
BIO 1 02/1 04 and PSY 1 1 0. Alternate years. 

BIO 413. BIOLOGICAL LITERATURE. 1. An introduction to the use and application of 
biological literature. Instruction in the organization and content of abstracts. 
Techniques for computerized search for information demonstrated in the library. 
Instruction in writing style used in scientific publications. Prerequisites: Junior or 
senior standing in the major. Fall. 

BIO 416. INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGY. 3. Individual research chosen by 
the student, subject to the approval of the instructor. The student must petition the 
Department of Biological and Physical Sciences for permission to register for this 
course prior to preregistration for the following semester. The petition must include 
an outline or summary of the proposed problem, stating the subject, purpose, and 
suggested methods and techniques; and it must include the number of semester 
hours to be completed in the course. Note: Course is also listed as BIO 414 for 1 
semester hour, and as BIO 415 for 2 semester hours. 

Courses of Instruction: CHEMISTRY 

CHE 120. FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY. 3. Basic concepts of chemistry. A 
course designed to prepare students who have had no high school chemistry and 
wish to prepare for CHE 200. A minimum proficiency in mathematics is necessary 
due to the quantitative nature of the material. Note: Counts toward the general col- 
lege core requirements in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Fall. 

CHE 121. FUNDAMENTAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 1. An introductory laborato- 
ry program designed to give basic laboratory skills in chemistry to non-science 
majors. Corequisite: CHE 120. Note: One two-hour laboratory period per week. 
Pass/Fail grading. Fall. 

CHE 151. GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I. 3. The study of basic concepts of 
inorganic chemistry with emphasis on stoichiometry of chemical reactions of solids, 
solutions, and gases, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, and thermo- 
chemistry. Corequisite: CHE 153. Note: Counts toward the general college core 
requirements in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Fall. 

CHE 152. GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II. 3. Emphasis on equilibria, kinetics, 
electrochemical reactions, and elementary thermodynamics. Corequisite: CHE 154. 
Note: Second semester continuation of CHE 151. Counts toward the general college 
core requirements in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Spring. 



Biological and Physical Sciences / 75 



CHE 153. GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I. 1. Laboratory experiments to 
supplement the lecture material of CHE 151 with emphasis on equipment, proce- 
dures, and techniques employed in the study of inorganic reactions. Corequisite: 
CHE 151. Note: One three-hour laboratory period per week. Fall. 

CHE 154. GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II. 1. Introduces spectrophotomet- 
ric methods, the pH meter, and selected methods of analysis. Corequisite: CHE 
152. Note: One three-hour laboratory period per week. Spring. 

CHE 200. FUNDAMENTALS OF ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY. 3. Designed for 
students in the allied health areas but a valuable short course for anyone requiring 
basic knowledge of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 120 or 
151 (or equivalent). Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in 
The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Spring. 

CHE 201. FUNDAMENTAL ORGANIC LABORATORY. 1. The basic techniques and 
procedures used in demonstrating the properties of organic compounds and biologi- 
cal molecules. Corequisite: CHE 200. Note: One two-hour laboratory period per 
week. Pass/Fail grading. Spring. 

CHE 300. INTRODUCTORY ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. 3. An introductory-level sur- 
vey of the basic theory and techniques of analytical chemistry. Emphasis placed on 
the scope of analytical methods and their application to the areas of chemistry, biolo- 
gy and the clinical sciences. Prerequisites: CHE 152/154 or 151/153, and 200/201. 
Corequisite: CHE 301 . Fall. 

CHE 301. ANALYTICAL LABORATORY. 1. A basic analytical laboratory program 
designed to develop skills necessary for standard analytical procedures frequently 
encountered. Includes some basic instrumental techniques. Corerequisite: CHE 
300. Note: One four-hour laboratory period per week. Fall. 

CHE 311. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I. 3. A detailed study of the chemistry of hydrocar- 
bons. Topics include nomenclature, the relations of physical structure to physical and 
chemical properties, organic mechanisms, stereochemistry conformational analysis, 
methods of synthesis, and characteristic reactions of hydrocarbons and halogen 
compounds. Includes interpretation of IR and NMR spectra. Prerequisites: CHE 
151/153 and 152/154. Corequisite: CHE 313. Fall. 

CHE 312. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II. 3. A study of nomenclature, properties, synthe- 
sis, and reactions of organic compounds containing oxygen and/or nitrogen. 
Prerequisite: CHE 311/313. Corequisite: CHE 314. Note: Second semester contin- 
uation of CHE 31 1 . Spring. 

CHE 313. ORGANIC LABORATORY I. 1. Laboratory exercises including methods for 
the determination of physical properties, separation, purification, and synthesis of 
hydrocarbons and halogen compounds. Corequisite: CHE 311. Note: One three- 
hour laboratory period per week. Fall. 

CHE 314. ORGANIC LABORATORY II. 1. Laboratory exercises including a synthesis 
of structures containing oxygen and nitrogen, application of IR and NMR spectra, 
and a multi-step synthesis. Corequisite: CHE 312. Note: One three-hour laboratory 
period per week. Spring. 

CHE 327. BIOCHEMISTRY. 3. A study of the structure and properties of biological 
molecules, metabolism, enzymes, and kinetics of enzyme reactions. Prerequisites: 
CHE 312 and BIO 118. Fall. 

CHE 329. BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 1. Laboratory exercises in analytical 
methods related to the determination of biological structures, methods for the isola- 
tion and purification of biological materials, and studies of enzymatic reactions. 
Prerequisite: Either CHE 300 or CHE 450. Corequisite: CHE 327. Note: Six hours 



76 / Biological and Physical Sciences 



of laboratory on alternate weeks. Fall. 

CHE 340. ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY. 3. Advanced topics in metabo- 
lism, hormone action and structure, function of DNA, and protein synthesis. 
Prerequisites: CHE 327/329. Spring. 

CHE 342. ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 1. Laboratory exercises 
that are more advanced than in CHE 329, requiring more independence in preparing 
experimental design and execution. Prerequisite: CHE 327/329. Corequisite: CHE 
340. Note: Six hours of laboratory work on alternate weeks. Spring. 

CHE 400. PRINCIPLES OF THERMODYNAMICS. 3. Studies of the major principles of 
physical chemistry with introductory material on thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinet- 
ics, and related topics. Prerequisites: CHE 151 and 152, PHY 130 and 132, MAT 
109, and CHE 300. Note: Also listed as PHY 400. 

CHE 401. APPLICATIONS OF THERMODYNAMICS. 2. Studies of the physical prop- 
erties of materials. Specific applications involve gas laws, calorimetry, colligative 
properties, rate law, and other properties of chemical and physical systems. Pre or 
Corequisite: CHE 400. Note: One hour of instruction and four hours of laboratory 
per week. Also listed as PHY 401 . 

CHE 421. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 3. Study of the structure of matter; presents both 
classical and modern theories of bonding. Other topics include crystal field theory, 
and molecular orbit theory, theoretical spectroscopy and crystallography. 
Prerequisite: CHE 400. 

CHE 450- ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENTATION. 3. Practical studies of modern chemi- 
cal instrumentation with applications in separation sciences, identification, and quan- 
tification. Prerequisite: CHE 400. 

CHE 451. TECHNIQUES OF INSTRUMENTATION. 2. Study of the applications of the 
common analytical instruments covering spectroscopy (UV, Visible, IR, NMR), chro- 
matography (CG, LC, HPLC, gel permeation), polarimetry, and electrochemistry. 
Prerequisites: CHE 400 and 401. Corequisite or Prerequisite: CHE 450. Note: 
One hour of instruction and one four-hour laboratory period per week. 

CHE 480. INTERNSHIP IN CHEMISTRY. 3. An internship position in a chemical 
research laboratory, commercial laboratory, or state laboratory. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Chair of the Department. Note: minimum of ten on-site work hours per 
week (or the equivalent in summer). 

CHE 494. INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN CHEMISTRY. 4. Application and practice of 
information or methods contained in the courses offered in the chemistry major. In 
consultation with chemistry instructor a project may be designed that is to student's 
ability. Prerequisite: Student must have junior or senior-level standing in the chem- 
istry major. Permission of the instructor. Notes: Course is also listed as CHE 491 for 
1 semester hour, as CHE 492 for 2 semester hours, and as CHE 493 for 3 semester 
hours. Regular courses of instruction may not be taken as CHE 494 nor will CHE 
494 substitute for required courses. 

Courses of Instruction: PHYSICS 

PHY 130. GENERAL PHYSICS I. 3. A general physics course which is non-calculus 
based. Includes a study of motion, forces, heat, and elementary concepts of thermo- 
dynamics. Although this is a non-calculus based course, the student should have 
command of algebra and a basic knowledge of trigonometry. Prerequisite: MAT 
106 (or equivalent). Corequisite: PHY 131. Note: Counts toward the general col- 
lege core requirements in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Fall. 

PHY 131. GENERAL PHYSICS I LABORATORY. 1. Corequisite: PHY 130. Note: 



Biological and Physical Sciences / 77 



Two hours of laboratory per week. Fall. 

PHY 132. GENERAL PHYSICS II. 3. Includes a study of electricity and magnetism, 
wave motion, electromagnetic radiation, optics, and topics in nuclear studies. 
Prerequisites: PHY 130/132. Corequisite: PHY 132. Notes: Second semester 
continuation of PHY 130. Counts toward the general college core requirements in 
The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Spring. 

PHY 133. GENERAL PHYSICS II LABORATORY. 1. Corequisite: PHY 132. Note: 
Two hours of laboratory per week. Spring. 

PHY 230. INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY. 4. An introductory course on the ele- 
ments of astronomy with emphasis on the solar system and its relation to various 
celestial objects contained in our galaxy. Lecture demonstrations presenting tech- 
niques and materials involved in astronomy. Also includes some of the current theo- 
ries regarding the origin and destiny of stellar objects. A demonstration laboratory 
with written assignments supplements the course. Prerequisite: PHY 130. 

PHY 439. INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS. 4. Application and practice of meth- 
ods or information contained in the normal courses offered in physics. In consulta- 
tion with physics instructor, a project may be designed that is appropriate to the stu- 
dent's ability. Prerequisites: Completion of eight hours of physics. Permission of the 
instructor. Note: Regular courses in the physics program may not be taken as PHY 
439. 

Courses of Instruction: GENERAL SCIENCE 

SCI 101. PHYSICAL SCIENCE. 2. Survey course of physics and chemistry covering 
basic concepts of measurements and investigations. Three hours of lecture and two 
hours of laboratory per week for first half of semester. Prerequisite: MAT 101 or 
102. Notes: Not open to students who select CHE 120/121 or 151/153. Counts 
toward the general college core requirements in The Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics. Fall, Spring. 

SCI 102. INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SCIENCE. 2. A study of the basic concepts of 
geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. Three hours of lecture and 
two hours of laboratory per week for the second half of semester. Prerequisite: SCI 
101. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in The Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics. Fall, Spring. 

SCI 301. EARTH SCIENCE — PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. 4. A study of the distribu- 
tions of the natural phenomena of the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The labo- 
ratory is devoted to using and interpreting published weather data, weather maps, 
topographic and geologic maps, and aerial photographs. Prerequisite: SCI 102. 
Note: At least one day field trip is an integral part of the course and participation is 
required. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. 

SCI 400. CONCEPTS OF SCIENCE. 3. A study of the concepts of science, evaluation 
of the application of science and technology, and the role of science in modern soci- 
ety. 

SCI 459. METHODS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION. 2. A survey of the methods, technol- 
ogy and safety procedures in teaching science. Seminars and demonstrations pro- 
vide opportunity to learn appropriate teaching methods and their application. 
Laboratory safety and environmental concerns are stressed. Two three-hour meet- 
ings per week (one-half semester). Prerequisite: EDU 458, and admission to the 
Teacher Education Program. Fall. 



78 / Biological and Physical Sciences 



BUSINESS PROGRAMS 

Professor: Jaggi 

Associate Professor: Stanton 

Assistant Professors: Dillard, Edmondson, Eggers (Co-Chair), Jolly, Kaplan, Meskey, 

Mitchell (Co-Chair), Parker, Petway ■ 

Student Organizations: Phi Beta Lambda (Accounting and Business Divisions) 

General Information about Majors and Minors: 

• The Department offers majors leading to the B.S. degree in Accounting and in 
Business Administration. For students majoring in these two programs there is an 
option of specializing in one or more tracks: Computer Information Systems, 
Finance, Management, and Marketing. The requirements for these "Specialization 
Tracks" are outlined later. 

• The Department offers a joint major with the Department of Psychology. It leads to a 
B.S. degree in Psychology/Business and is suitable for a student interested in a 
career in Personnel/Human Resources Management. 

• The Department also cooperates with the Department of Physical education and 
Sports Studies in a major leading to a B.S. degree in Sports Management. A student 
may select a minor in these areas, as well as in Economics. 

• A student majoring in one area of Business and minoring in another must have the 
minor approved by the Chair of the Department. 

• The College is a member of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of 
Business (AACSB). AACSB standards and guidelines are used for the development 
of the Accounting and Business Administration programs. 

Note: All courses listed in the Requirements are 3-hour courses except where noted 
with a number in parentheses. 

ACCOUNTING MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Accounting Core courses: ACC 151 , 152, 254, 255, 353, 356, 451 , 453, 456, 457. 

• Business Programs Core courses: BUS 221, 321, 322; ECO *231, 232, 339; MGT 
361;MKT371. 

• Computer expectations: CIS 050. 

Total: 57 semester hours; *three hours of these may be counted toward the general 
college core requirements in The Social Sciences. 

Accounting CPA Exam Preparation: Additional accounting courses 
taken as preparation for the CPA exam: ACC 355, 459. 

ACCOUNTING MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Accounting courses: ACC 151, 152, 254, 255, 353. 

• Accounting elective: choose one ACC course from the 300- or 400-level. 
Total: 18 semester hours. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• General Business courses: BUS 221, 313, 321, 488. 

• Accounting courses: ACC 151, 152, 253. 

• Economics courses: ECO *231 , 232, 339. 

• Other required courses: MGT 361 , MKT 371 . 

• Elective courses in the Department of Business Programs: 9 hours at 300- or 400- 
level. 

• Computer expectations: CIS 050. 

Total: 48 semester hours; *three hours of these may be counted toward the general 
college core requirements in The Social Sciences. 



Business Programs / 79 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• ACC 1 51 , ECO 231 , BUS 31 3, MGT 361 , MKT 371 . 

• Elective course in the Department of Business Programs: 3 hours at 300- or 400-level. 
Total: 18 semester hours. 

ECONOMICS MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Economics courses: ECO 231, 232. 

• Economics electives: choose 12 hours of ECO courses at the 300- or 400-level. 
Total: 18 semester hours. 

Specialization Tracks 

To select a track, a student must declare that track before completing eighty 
semester hours (at least four full semesters before completing graduation 
requirements). 

Computer Information Systems Track Requirements: CIS 050, 367, 368, 
382, plus the choice of one course from CSC 201 or 231. Total: 12 semester 
hours beyond requirements of major. 

Finance Track Requirements: ECO 333, 339, 431, choose either 434 or 331; 
choose either 437 (4) or 438; MKT 475. Total: 15 or 16 semester hours beyond 
requirements of major. 

Management Track Requirements: MGT 361 , 363, 366, 368; ECO 432. Total 
I 12 semester hours beyond requirements of major. 

Marketing Track Requirements: MKT 371, 471, 472, 475, 476. Total: 12 
semester hours beyond requirements of major. 

* PSYCHOLOGY/BUSINESS MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: These requirements 
are listed in the section for the Department of Psychology in this catalog. 

SPORT MANAGEMENT MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: These requirements are 
listed in the section for the Department of Physical Education and Sports Science in 
this catalog. 

Courses of Instruction: ACCOUNTING 

ACC 151. ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING I. 3. Introduces accounting as an information 
development and communication process that supports economic decision making. 
Topics include the basic structure of accounting (transaction analysis, recording, and 
reporting), accounting systems (specialized journals and internal controls), and bal- 
ance sheet accounts (current and noncurrent assets). Fall, Spring. 

ACC 152. ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING II. 3. Second semester continuation of ACC 

151. Topics include balance sheet accounts (current and long-term liabilities and the 
shareholder's equity accounts), the income statement, and the statement of cash 
flows. Prerequisite: ACC 151. Fall, Spring. 

ACC 253. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING. 3. Emphasis on the use of accounting data. 
A look at how accounting information can be interpreted and used by management in 
planning and controlling business activities. Insight into the use of accounting data in 
planning for the future, controlling operations, and making routine and non-routine 
decisions. Prerequisite: ACC 151 and 152. Fall, Spring. 

ACC 254. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I. 3. First course in a three-part, intermedi- 
ate level financial accounting progression, encompassing the theory and application 
of professional standards for external reporting by commercial entities. Topics cov- 
ered: Theoretical framework of financial accounting, income statement, balance 
sheet, current assets, and accounting for time value of money. Prerequisite: ACC 

152. Fall. 



80 / Business Programs 



ACC 255. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II. 3. Second in the three-part, intermediate 
level, financial accounting progression, continuing the study and application of pro- 
fessional accounting standards for external reporting by commercial entities. Topics 
include: current and fixed assets, current liabilities and long term liabilities and stock- 
holders' equity. Prerequisite: ACC 254. Spring. 

ACC 353. COST ACCOUNTING I. 3. Principles and procedures for planning, control- 
ling, and product costing in a manufacturing environment. Topics include cost-vol- 
ume-profit analysis, job costing, process costing, budgeting, and cost allocation. 
Prerequisite: ACC 254, Spring. 

ACC 354. COST ACCOUNTING II. 3. A study of relevant cost for nonroutine decisions. 
Emphasis on capital budgeting technique and cost allocation. Included is a study of 
joint product and by-product costing with provision for spoilage and defective units. 
Prerequisite: ACC 353. Spring. 

ACC 355. NON-PROFIT ACCOUNTING. 3. Principles and operation of fund account- 
ing, financial reporting, budgetary control, and auditing for effective financial adminis- 
tration of state and local governments and non-profit institutions. Prerequisites: 
ACC 152. 

ACC 356. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III. 3. Final segment of the three-part 
intermediate financial accounting progression. Topics covered: Earnings per share, 
investments, special revenue recognition, deferred taxes, leases, pensions, account- 
ing changes, and statement of cash flow. Prerequisite: ACC 255. Fall. 

ACC 451. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING. 3. Focuses on the accounting issues that arise 
from mergers and acquisitions. Special attention is given to the consolidation 
process at the date of acquisition or merger, the results of operations in the year of 
that transaction, and the results of operations and the financial position of the consol- 
idated entity in subsequent years. Other topics may include partnerships, foreign-cur- 
rency transactions, industry segments, bankruptcy, and governmental accounting. 
Prerequisite: ACC 356. Fall. 

ACC 453. AUDITING. 3. Examines the CPA's role in external financial-statement audit- 
ing. Attention is given to the legal environment surrounding the audit process, risk 
analysis, audit planning, internal control, statistical and nonstatistical sampling, evi- 
dence gathering, and reporting. Course may include a computerized audit case 
study. Prerequisite: ACC 356. Spring. 

ACC 456. FEDERAL INCOME TAXATION I. 3. A study of the history and development 
of income taxation in the United States. Includes an investigation into individual 
income taxation with emphasis on property transactions, itemized deductions and 
various tax credits. Tax research procedures and the tax legislative process are also 
studied. Prerequisite: ACC 254. Fall. 

ACC 457. FEDERAL INCOME TAXATION II. 3. The study of corporate, partnership, 
estate and trust taxation. Emphasis is on corporation and partnership taxation, 
including investigation into distributions, tax structure, and determination of income 
tax liability and reporting requirements. Prerequisite: ACC 456 or permission of 
instructor. Spring. 

ACC 459. C.P.A. REVIEW. 3. Review of subject material in preparation for the Uniform 
CPA Examination and practice of problematic and essay questions from past exam 
question offerings. A highlight of the course is a module consisting of specific study 
techniques, including CPA solution algorithms. Prerequisites: ACC 353, 354, 451, 
456. Spring. 



Business Programs /81 



Courses of Instruction: GENERAL BUSINESS 

BUS 111. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS. 3. Enables student to understand and to 
use business principles in personal life. Provides a survey of the following topics: 
business trends, business formation, marketing, management and human resources, 
finance, ethics, and international business. Ample time devoted to contemporary and 
innovative topics in the business world. Note: Not open to Business Administration 
majors with junior or senior standing. Fall, Spring. 

BUS 221. ECONOMIC, SOCIAL, AND BUSINESS STATISTICS. 3. The principles of 
applying standard statistical techniques to the solution of economic, social, and busi- 
ness problems. Prerequisite: MAT 100-101, 102, or equivalent. Fall, Spring. 

BUS 313. BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS. 3. Extensive coverage of communication 
theory, written and non-written communication skills (including report preparation, 
memorandums, business letters, resume writing, group process, and interactive pro- 
jects and critical thinking skills). Prerequisite: ENG 101, 102. 

BUS 314. MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS. 3. Solving business-financial problems 
such as payroll, discounts, interest, promissory notes, present value, annuities, finan- 
cial analysis, and metrics while developing competency in the operation of electronic 
calculator. 

BUS 321. BUSINESS LAW I. 3. An introduction to the legal system discussing litiga- 
tion, torts, criminal law, agency, property, with an in-depth look at the law of con- 
tracts. Fall, Spring. 

BUS 322. BUSINESS LAW II. 3. Reviews common business transactions under the 
Uniform Commercial Code, forms of business organizations, and the regulation of 
business by government. Prerequisite: BUS 321 . Spring. 

BUS 410. HONORS SEMINAR. 1, 2, or 3. Admission by invitation of the department. 
Spring. 

BUS 429. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH PROBLEMS IN BUSINESS. 1, 2, or 3. Individual 
research problems in business applications and methods chosen by the student with 
approval of the instructor. Prerequisite: Major or minor in Business with senior 
standing. Student must have approval of the Chair of the Department. Fall, Spring. 

BUS 481. GLOBAL DIMENSIONS OF BUSINESS. 3. A study of the concepts neces- 
sary for students to compete and work in a globalized business environment. 
Emphasis placed on marketing, management, trade, and competition factors in an 
international setting. Cultural, legal, political, and financial issues also considered. 
Prerequisites: ECO 231 , MGT 361 , and MKT 371 . Spring. 

BUS 488. BUSINESS POLICY AND STRATEGY. 3. Integrates prior studies in 
Management, Marketing, Accounting, Economics, and Finance. Views the organiza- 
tion from the vantage point of top management. Focuses on the processes of strate- 
gy formulation and execution. Prerequisites: MGT 361, ECO 339, MKT 371. Senior 
standing. Note: Requires a research paper and a computer simulation. Fall, Spring. 

Courses of Instruction: COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

CIS 050. COMPUTER CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS. 3. Provides the opportunity 
to use the computer as a problem-solving tool to enrich one's personal and profes- 
sional life. Laboratory exercises furnish hands-on experience with general-purpose 
software applications such as word processing, spread-sheets, graphics, and data- 
base. Lectures focus on computer functions, hardware and software issues, and the 
role of computers in society. Note: Also listed as CSC 050. Fall, Spring. 



82 / Business Programs 



CIS 215. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING IN RPG II - PART 1 . 3. Course is designed to 
help the student create programs utilizing Report Program Generator Language and 
to determine the extent to which RPG may be helpful in business installations. Upon 
successful completion of the course, the student is able to code specification sheets, 
produce a spacing chart of any output report and/or summary records to be generat- 
ed, select the coding approach that results in the fewest generated program instruc- 
tions, create the control cards required for the assembling and running of RPG 
Program. Prerequisite: CIS 050 or consent of instructor. Note: Also listed as CSC 
215. Two lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Fall. 

CIS 218. COBOL PROGRAMMING I. 3. Understanding the programming language 
COBOL and its applications to business. Emphasis is placed on COBOL Divisions, 
file manipulation, diagnostics, and debugging-programming assignments. 
Prerequisite: CIS 201 or permission of instructor. Note: Also listed as CSC 218. 
Two lecture and two laboratory hours per week. 

CIS 367. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 3. Analysis of management 
information systems (MIS) for the purpose of planning and decision making (busi- 
ness operations, control and planning applications such as planning models, simula- 
tion, and performance evaluation). Prerequisites: CIS 050, MGT 361 or permission 
of instructor. Note: Also listed as MGT 367. Fall. 

CIS 368. PRODUCTION/OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT. 3. The relation of financial, 
marketing, organization, and communication systems to the operations function. 
Special emphasis on quantitative decision methods for operations planning, organiz- 
ing, and control. Prerequisites: BUS 221 , CIS 050, MGT 361 . Also listed as MGT 
368. Spring. 

CIS 382. MICROCOMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN BUSINESS. 3. Provides hands-on 
instruction in the intermediate/advanced use of word processing, spreadsheets, data- 
base, and DOS. Emphasis placed upon practical usage commonly encountered in 
the business environment. A student successfully completing this course will leave 
with a good working knowledge of the products discussed and be able to apply 
learned skills in the business world. Prerequisite: CIS 050. Fall, Spring. 

Courses of Instruction: ECONOMICS 

ECO 231. PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS. 3. Deals with theoretical core of 
aggregate phenomena such as levels of employment, output, and prices in a decen- 
tralized economic system. Analysis of income-expenditure and income-price models. 
Classical and Keynesian theories are compared and contrasted. Both the income- 
expenditure and income-price models are employed to analyze issues of fiscal poli- 
cy, inflation, and unemployment. Note: Counts toward the general college core 
requirements in The Social Sciences. Fall, Spring. 

ECO 232. PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS. 3. Explores ways in which individual 
business units operate and interrelate. Examines how consumers, owners of factors 
of production, and business people interact to meet many of society's needs. Also 
investigates the fundamentals of supply and demand, market structure and perfor- 
mance and the basic principles which surround all the resource markets (labor and 
capital). Examines basic market structures of pure competition, pure monopoly, 
monopolistic competition and oligopoly. Fall, Spring. 

ECO 331. CONSUMER MANAGEMENT. 3. Builds useful skills in buying, managing 
finances, increasing resources, and protecting legal interests. Study of the prevailing 
economy and government as it affects life and the prevailing economic system. 
Prerequisite: ECO 231 . Fall. 



Business Programs / 83 



ECO 332. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY AND WORLD TRADE. 3. Geographical analy- 
sis of the distribution and interaction of economic activities in both the United States 
and in the world at large. Includes discussion of demographic factors. Prerequisite: 
ECO 231, or permission of instructor. Note: Also listed as GEO 312. Fall, odd years. 

ECO 333. MONEY AND BANKING. 3. Monetary systems, the banking structure, prac- 
tical banking problems, and international finance. Prerequisites: ECO 231, MAT 
100-101, 102 or equivalent. Fall. 

ECO 334. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE U.S. 3. Effects of achievements in 
agriculture, industry and manufacturing, trade, monetary systems, transportation, 
and population on the economic development of the United States. Prerequisite: 
ECO 231. Spring. 

ECO 335. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS. 3. A survey of similarities and dif 
ferences between various economic systems through examination of different coun 
tries including the United States, the former Soviet Union, Sweden, China, Japan, 
India, and others. 

ECO 339. CORPORATE FINANCE. 3. Establishes the goal of the corporation and the 
environment in which the financial manager makes decisions. Special emphasis 
given to the investment, financing, and dividend decisions. Other topics include cost 
of capital, present value, taxes, ratio analysis, breakeven analysis, financial planning, 
and working capital management. Prerequisites: ACC 152, 253 (for Business 
Administration majors only), BUS 221 . Fall, Spring. 

ECO 340. ADVANCED CORPORATE FINANCE. 3. A careful and in-depth study of the 
more advanced topics in Finance. Major emphasis to be placed on decisions involv- 
ing capital structure optimization, dividend policy, capital budgeting, and raising capi- 
tal. Prerequisite: ECO 339, or permission of instructor. 

ECO 431. INVESTMENTS. 3. An analysis of the different type investments and their 
use in a balanced portfolio, function of financial markets, methods of analyzing indi- 
vidual securities and the basic principles involved in the selection of sound invest- 
ments. Prerequisite: ECO 231 . Spring. 

ECO 432. LABOR PROBLEMS. 3. The trade union as an institution: management 
objectives, bargaining processes, economics of wage determination, and the politico- 
economic impact of trade unions on the economy. Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232. 
Spring. 

ECO 436. CONTEMPORARY ECONOMICS. 3. A careful study of the present econom- 
ic events and their interpretation in terms of the current situation. Imparts a practical 
foundation necessary to understanding economic affairs to the present and future. 
Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232. Spring. 

ECO 437. REAL ESTATE. 4. An introduction to the basic principles of real estate. 
Objective to help one better understand real estate as it applies to one's own real 
estate transactions and to provide background for one planning to offer competent 
and professional services in the real estate field. Fall. 

ECO 438. GENERAL INSURANCE. 3. A study of the principles and practices of insur- 
ance, particularly as they apply to business. Automobile, life, health, and homeown- 
er's insurance, bonds, liability, workers compensation and social security studied 
with a consumer emphasis. Fall. 

Courses of Instruction: MANAGEMENT 

MGT 345. BUSINESS ETHICS. 3. An exploration of ethical issues arising in the con- 
text of doing business. Ethical theory will be investigated and applied to case studies 
representing a variety of business situations. Note: Also listed as PHI 345. Spring. 



84 /Business Programs 



MGT 361. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT. 3. A study of functions that comprise the 
process of reaching organizational goals by working with and through people. 
Prerequisite: BUS 313. Fall, Spring. 

MGT 363. HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT. 3. A study of the personnel activi- 
ties with the emphasis that employees are investments and, if effectively managed 
and developed, will provide long-term rewards to the organization in the form of 
greater productivity. Fall. 

MGT 364. PERSONNEL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (INDUSTRIAL). 3. 

An analysis of organizational behavior using a system approach to understand rela- 
tionships between productivity, satisfaction, various patterns of leadership and orga- 
nizational design, and the selection, placement, and training of employees. 
Applicable to industrial, governmental, military, and educational organizations. Fall. 

MGT 366. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR. 3. The study of organizational compo- 
nents, their interactions, and their impact on human behavior, change, and organiza- 
tional performance to accomplish desired results. Prerequisite: MGT 361 . Spring. 

MGT 367. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 3. Analysis of management 
information systems (MIS) for the purpose of planning and decision-making (busi- 
ness operations, control and planning applications such as planning models, simula- 
tion, and performance evaluation). Prerequisites: CIS 050, MGT 361, or permission 
of instructor. Note: Also listed as CIS 367. Fall. 

MGT 368. PRODUCTION/OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT. 3. The relation of financial, 
marketing, organization, and communication systems to the operations function. 
Special emphasis on quantitative decision methods for operations planning, organiz- 
ing, and control. Prerequisites: BUS 221, CIS 050, MGT 361. Note: Also listed as 
CIS 368. Spring. 

MGT 462. WOMEN AND MEN IN MANAGEMENT. 3. A study of the contemporary 
roles of women and men with emphasis upon the factors essential for managerial 
entry and advancement. Special attention is given to gender issues, dual career cou- 
ples, differences in male and female leadership styles, sexual harassment, organiza- 
tional culture, and the informal organization. Spring. 

MGT 465. SEMINAR IN MANAGERIAL DECISION MAKING. 3. Focus on the decision 
making process with an emphasis on the human element. The course simulates real 
world dilemmas that test critical thinking skills with an emphasis on identifying and 
developing the issues. Prerequisite: MGT 361 , or permission of instructor. Spring. 

Courses of Instruction: MARKETING 

MKT 371. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING. 3. Deals with problems and practices in 
modern marketing management. Study and integration of major tasks and decisions 
involved in developing and marketing products and services. Course has managerial 
orientation. Prerequisite: BUS 313, ECO 232. Fall, Spring. 

MKT 471. PRINCIPLES OF RETAILING. 3. Important problems arising in retail store 
management; store location, arrangement, organizations, personnel, buying, selling, 
accounting and statistical control, problems of general policy. Prerequisite: MKT 
371. Fall. 

MKT 472. PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING. 3. Covers the many aspects of the mod- 
ern practice of advertising. Social and economic aspects covered. Practical work 
included. Prerequisite: MKT 371 . Spring. 

MKT 475. SELLING PRINCIPLES & STRATEGIES. 3. Introduces the principles of 
selling with an emphasis upon the professional salesperson. Research and sales 



Business Programs / 85 



planning is stressed. Prerequisite: MKT 371 or permission of instructor. Note: Sales 
presentation prepared and presented by each student. Fall. 

MKT 476. MARKETING RESEARCH. 3. Deals with the theory and application of mar- 
keting research as a tool for the decision-making process. Special emphasis is given 
on problem definition, research design, sampling procedure, data collection, statisti- 
cal analysis, interpretation of data and reporting of research findings. Prerequisites: 
MKT 371, BUS 221. Spring. 



86 / Communication, Performing and Visual Arts 



COMMUNICATION, PERFORMING AND VISUAL ARTS 

Professor: Brown, Crouch, Whitehurst, Wilson 

Associate Professors: Bostick, Marshall, Ping-Robbins, Rakow, Reitmeyer, Turk 

Assistant Professors: Hancock (Chair), Lee, Struthers 

Instructor: Stutts 

Student organizations: Art Students League, Music Club, Stage and Script. 

Note: All courses listed in the requirements are 3-hour courses except where noted 
with a number in parentheses. Each set of double course numbers represents a lec- 
ture course/laboratory course combination. 

Visual Arts Programs 

The Bachelor of Arts in studio art degree is a general degree without a particular area 
of emphasis. The Bachelor of Science degree in studio art consists of two areas of 
emphasis. The Bachelor of Fine Arts program emhasizes a single studio area. The 
areas of studio emphasis are: ceramics, commercial design, drawing, painting, photog- 
raphy, printmaking, and sculpture. The Bachelor of Science degree in Art Education 
leads to teacher certification in Grades K-12. 

Persons of a non-traditional college age, who are not interested in taking work for credit 
toward a degree, may take studio courses without credit when studio space is avail- 
able. These persons may enroll at any time and for any period with permission of the 
instructor. 

The Department reserves the right to show examples of each student's work in exhibi- 
tions at the College or elsewhere. The Department reserves the right to keep samples 
of a student's work for instruction, exhibition, or publication. 

Pass/Fail for the Non-Major in the Visual Arts 

Any junior or senior not majoring or minoring in the visual arts may, for 
enrichment purposes, elect up to six semester hours of visual art for a 
pass/fail grade. When such a student is enrolled in a visual art course 
written notification to the College Registrar must be made before the end 
of the drop-add period if pass/fail grading is desired. The student electing 
pass/fail grading may not change from one grading specification to anoth- 
er (pass fail grading to regular grading, or regular grading to pass/fail 
grading) after the initial registration and declaration of grading mode. The 
pass/fail option may not be applied to a course taken to satisfy a general 
college core requirement. 

ART (STUDIO) MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• ART 01 1 , 030, 040, 070, *081 , 090, 091 , 1 05, 1 06; select one from 020, 021 , or 022. 
select one from 060, 061 , or 062. 

• Art electives: Select six hours from two different studio areas. 

• Foreign language: Six hours. 

Total: 45 semester hours; *three of these may be counted toward the general college 
core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. 

ART (STUDIO) MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Core courses for Bachelor of Fine Arts: ART 011, *081, 090, 091, 105, 106; choose 
one from ART 020, 021 , or 022. B.F.A. core has 21 semester hours. 

• Choose one B.F.A. Area of Emphasis. All of these areas of emphasis have 36 
semester hours. 

Total: 57 semester hours: *three of these may be counted toward the general college 
core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. 



Communication, Performing and Visual Arts / 87 



B.F.A. Areas of Emphasis 

Ceramics Requirements: 

• Ceramics courses: ART 040 (or select 041 or 042 if 040 waived), 041 , 043, 045; 
select one from ART 042, 044, 046, or 047. Minimum of 15 semester hours from 
ART 040-047 required. 

ART 085, 030, 403; select one from ART 020 or 022. 
Art history elective: choose one course (3). 
Art electives: choose six hours (not Ceramics courses). 

Commercial Design Requirements: 

Commercial design courses: ART 050 (051 if 050 waived), 051 (052 if 051 
waived), 052 (select one from ART 053-057 if 052 waived); select one from ART 
053-057. 

Photography courses: select one from ART 068, 069, 070 (according to compe- 
tency). 

Printmaking course: choose ART 060 or 061 . 
ART 014, 020, 220, 403, 404; select one from ART 012 or 022. 

Drawing Requirements: 

Drawing courses: ART 012, 013, 014, 015, 022. 
ART 060, 061 ; select one from ART 030 or 040. 
Select one special project course from ART 403 or 404. 
Art history elective: choose one coursefSj. 
Art electives: choose six hours. 

Painting Requirements: 

Painting courses: ART 023, 024; Select two from ART 020, 021, or 022 that 

were not already chosen to satisfy the B.F.A. Core requirement listed above. 

ART 060, 070, 403, 404. 

Select one from ART 040, 083, 085. 

Select one from ART 012,01 3, or 01 4. 

Art history elective: choose one course (3). 

Art electives: Choose three hours. 

Photography Requirements: 

Photography courses: ART 070, 071, 072, 073, 074, 075. 

Drawing course: select one from ART 012, 013, 014, 015. 

Special Art project courses: ART 403, 404. 

Art history elective: choose one course (3). 

Art electives: choose six hours (not Photography courses). 

Printmaking Requirements: 

Printmaking courses: ART 060, 061, 062, 063, 064. 

Photography course: ART 068. 

Select one special project course from ART 403 or 404. 

Select one drawing course other than ART 01 1 . 

Select one painting course from ART 021 or 022. 

Art history elective: choose one course (3). 

Art electives: choose six hours. 

Sculpture Requirements: 

Sculpture courses: ART 030, 031, 033, 036; select one from ART 032, 034, 035, 

037. Minimum of 15 semester hours from ART 030-037 required. 

Select one painting course from ART 020 or 022. 

ART 085, 040, 403. 

Art history elective: choose one course (3). 

Art electives: choose six hours (not Sculpture courses). 



88 / Communication, Performing and Visual Arts 



ART (STUDIO) MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Core courses for Bachelor of Science: ART 011, *081, 090, 091, 105, 106, 403; 
select one from ART 020, 021 , or 022 (this choice may be specified by area of 
emphasis). B.S. core has 24 semester hours. 

• Choose two B.S. Areas of Emphasis totaling 30 semester hours. Each of these areas 
of emphasis have 15 semester hours. 

Total: 54 semester hours; *three hours of these may be counted toward the general 
college core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. 

B.S. Areas of Emphasis 

Ceramics Requirements: 

• Ceramics courses: ART 040, 041 , 042, 043. 

• ART 030 (or 036 if 030 is in the other chosen emphasis). 

Commercial Design Requirements: 

• Commercial design courses: ART 050 (or 051 if 050 is waived), 051 (or 052 if 051 

is waived), 052 (or select one from 053-057 if 052 is waived). 

• Choose one from ART 070, 071 , or 072 (depending upon the level of 

competency). 

• Special art project course: ART 404 (or select an art elective if 404 is in the other 

chosen emphasis). 

Drawing Requirements: 

• Drawing courses: ART 012,01 5; and either ART 01 3 or 01 4. 

• Select one course: ART 016, 060, or 061. 

• Special art project courses: ART 404. 

Painting Requirements: 

• Painting courses: ART 021 , 022, 023. 

• Select one course: ART 012, 013, 014. 

• Special art project course: ART 404 (or select an art elective if 404 is in the other 

chosen emphasis). 

Photography Requirements: 

• Photography courses: ART 070 (or 071 if 070 is waived), 071 (or 072 if 071 is 

waived), 072 (or 073 or 074 if 072 is waived). 

• Printmaking course: ART 060 or 061 (or 073 if Printmaking is the other chosen 

emphasis). 

• Special art project course: ART 404 (or select an art elective if 404 is in the other 

chosen emphasis). 

Printmaking Requirements: 

• Printmaking courses: ART 060, 061 , 062, 063. 

• Drawing course: choose one from ART 012, 013, or 014. 

Sculpture Requirements: 

• Sculpture courses: ART 030, 031 , 032, 033. 

• ART 040 (or 047 if 040 is in the other chosen emphasis). 

ART EDUCATION MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Complete the Art major requirements: ART 01 1 , 040, 060, 070, *081 , 085, 090, 091 , 
105, 106, 373/374 (2/1); select one from ART 020, 121, or 022; select six semester 
hours in an area of art concentration. 

Total: 42 semester hours: *three of these may be counted toward the general college 
core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. 

• Courses in the general college core requirements prescribed for Special Area 
Teacher certification: BIO 101/103 (3/1); SCI 101 (2) and 102 (2), HIS 223, POL 230, 



Communication, Performing and Visual Arts/ 89 



PSY 223. 

• Professional Education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Semester: ART 459 (2); EDU 201 and 458 (2); ENG 363; 

PSY 323 and 343. 

During the Professional Semester (Spring): EDU 443 (2), 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 (6). 

• Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0), 033 (0), 044 (0). 

• Complete all Entrance Criteria requirements listed below. 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional education 
course. Only the student who successfully completes all phases of the Entrance 
Criteria Program and meets all other department requirements can be permitted to 
enter pre-service teaching. 

Entrance Criteria Program 

The Entrance Criteria Program (ECP) is designed to screen candidates for 
teacher certification. This program requires data to demonstrate that the can- 
didate possesses the necessary competencies to be an effective teacher. 
There are specific time constraints on some of the requirements. The student 
is responsible for complying with all ECP guidelines. The student must suc- 
cessfully complete: 

Phase I: To be completed by the end of the Sophomore Year. 

SAT Scores on file 

Strong Interest Inventory 

Declaration of Major 

EDU 01 1 Practicum (elementary art) and EDU 022 Practicum (junior high 

art) 
NTE Core Battery I and Core Battery II 
Probability of Success 
Student Advisement Document (Part A) 
Interview for Candidacy 
2.50 GPA on all courses attempted 
Application to Teacher Education: Admission to candidacy for certification 

is contingent on successful completion of Phase I requirements. Upon 

admission to candidacy, a student may then register for upper-level 

(300-400) education courses. 
Phase II: To be completed by the end of the Junior Year. 
EDU 033 Practicum (senior high art) 
2.50 GPA on all course work attempted, all courses in the major, and on all 

professional education courses 
Application for Student teaching 
Student Advisement Document (Part B) 
Phase III: To be completed by the end of the Senior Year. 
EDU 044 Teaching Skills Laboratory 
Exit Interview (Visual Arts faculty) 
Departmental Recommendation for Student teaching 
Student Teaching (minimum grade of "C") 

NTE Core Battery III Professional Knowledge and teaching Specialty 
Student Advisement Document (Part C) 
Application for Certification 

ART (STUDIO) MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• ART 01 1 , 081 , 090, 091 ; select either ART 1 05 or 1 06. 

• Art elective: choose three semester hours. 
Total: 21 semester hours. 



90 / Communication, Performing and Visual Arts 



Communications Program 

The Communications Program offers five areas of focus: Broadcasting/Video, 
Business, International, Journalism, and Public Relations. The Broadcasting/Video, 
Journalism, and Public Relations focuses are designed to prepare graduates for work 
in mass media/mass communications. The Business and International focuses prepare 
students to work in communication in those areas. 

COMMUNICATIONS MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Communications Core: COM 101, 350, 450, 461; ART, 105, DRA/ENG 012; ENG 
318. 

• Completion of one communications focus. 

• Modern language course: Two courses at the intermediate level (*201 and *202). 
Note: Up to 12 hours may be earned by completion of practicum courses in 

Broadcasting/Video (BRO 025) and Journalism (JOU 021, JOU 023). 
Total: 51 semester hours. *Of these, up to six hours may be counted toward the gener- 
al college core requirements in Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. 

COMMUNICATIONS MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Communications Core: COM 101, 350, 450, 461; ART, 105, DRA/ENG 012; ENG 

318. 

• Completion of one Communications Focus. 

Note: Up to 12 hours may be earned by completion of practicum courses in 

Broadcasting/Video (BRO 025) and Journalism (JOU 021, 023). 
Total: 45 semester hours. 

COMMUNICATIONS MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• COM 061; choose one course from DRA 012, ENG 317 or 318, and ART 105; 
choose one course from ANT 201, ECO 231, FRE 325, GEO 201, SPA 325, POL 
201,202,096. 

• From one Communications Focus: Choose three courses. 
Total: 1 8 semester hours. 

Communication Focuses 

Broadcast/Video Focus Requirements: BRO 220, 320, 420; DRA 1 10 or 210; 
DRA 340; JOU 213. Choose one course from the following: ART 057, ART 070, or 
ENG 207. BRO 025 (3 semester hours). Total: 24 semester hours. 

Business Focus Requirements: ACC 151, COM 321, ECO 232, BUS 313, MGT 
361 . Choose three courses from MKT 371 , 471 , 472, or 475. Total 24 semester 
hours. 

International Focus Requirements: Prescribed French or Spanish courses: 201, 
202, 301 , 302; choose one from 303, 31 1 , 312, or 421 . Prescribed Political Science 
courses: POL 203, 301 , 302. Total: 24 semester hours. 

Journalism Focus Requirements: Journalism courses: JOU 213, 313, 314. Art 
courses: ART 050 and 070. Choose two courses from ENG 020, 317, or JOU 415. 
Complete a total of 3 semester hours from JOU 021 , 023. Total: 24 semester hours. 

Public Relations Focus Requirements: COM 321, 441; JOU 213. Choose two 
courses: BRO 220, 320; JOU 313, 314; ENG 317. Choose two courses: ART 050, 
051, 052, 053, 054, 055, 056, 057, 070. Chooses one course: BUS 313, MKT 371, 
or MKT 472. Total: 24 semester hours. 



Communication, Performing and Visual Arts / 91 



Drama Program 

DRAMA MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Drama courses: DRA013or016; 017; 110 or 210; 340; 310 or 313 or 314. 

• English course: ENG 307 or 308. 
Total: 18 semester hours. 

Music Program 

A student wishing to major or minor in music must satisfactorily complete an audition 
and interview with the Music faculty. The transfer student must audition, be inter- 
viewed, and take a theory placement test. A student may test out of any course in the 
Music Program except the performance studies courses (Major Lessons) and ensem- 
bles. 

Pass-Fail Option 

Any junior or senior not majoring or minoring in music may, for enrichment purposes, 
elect up to six semester hours of music courses for a Pass/Fail grade. The student 
must follow the college regulations pertaining to this option. 



For Admission to Upper-level Music Courses 

To identify students whose degree of competency in music theory, in history and litera- 
ture, and in performance qualifies them to continue in the curriculum as music majors 
(B.A. and B.S. degree programs); and to identify students whose competencies do not 
meet the set standards necessary for continuance in the music curricula, the Music 
faculty administers the sophomore Comprehensive Musicianship Screening (CMS). 
The process includes satisfactory passing of (1) specific courses, and (2) an interview 
with the faculty. The passing of these two parts of the CMS allows the student to enroll 
in upper-level (300 and 400) music courses. 

For continuing students, the CMS prerequisites are MUS 041, 042, 043, 044, 221, 222, 
223, 224, eight semester hours of Major Lessons, and four semester hours of ensem- 
ble; an overall grade point average of 2.50, a music grade point average of 2.50, and 
no grade lower than "C-" in major courses. In addition, Music Education majors must 
successfully complete MUS 045, 046, 047, and 048. The CMS interview is conducted 
before the end of the semester in which the prerequisites are completed. A continuing 
or transfer student may pre-register for the next semester prior to the CMS interview 
but must satisfy all requirements in order to continue as a music major at the upper 
level. The student not passing any part of the CMS is required to change the class 
schedule during the drop-add period in the following semester. 

The transfer student will meet the same requirements as the continuing student as list- 
ed in the previous paragraph, including course work and the interview. Certain conces- 
sions may be made, however, to accommodate differences in requirements between 
the College and the institution in which the student was formerly enrolled. Before regis- 
tering for courses at Barton College the transfer student is auditioned, examined, and 
evaluated by special appointment. 

MUSIC MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Music courses: MUS 041 (1), 042 (1), 043 (1), 044 (1), 121, 122, 221, 222, *223, 
*224, 322, 340, 341 . 

• Non-performance music elective: Choose one course (3). A course taken to satisfy 
The Humanities and Fine Arts component of the general college core requirements 



92 / Communication, Performing and Visual Arts 



may not be used to satisfy this requirement. 

• Major Music Lessons for eight semesters: 16 semester hours. 

• Music ensemble courses for eight semesters: eight semester hours. 

• Successfully perform a full recital. 

• Foreign language: *six semester hours. 

Total: 64 semester hours; *12 of these may be counted toward the general college 
core requirements. 

MUSIC EDUCATION MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Courses in the Music major: MUS 041 (1), 042 (1), 043 (1), 044 (1), 045 (1), 046 (1), 
047 (1), 048 (1), 121 , 122, 221 , 222, *223, *224, 340, 341 , 350, 351 . 

• Non-performance Music elective: choose one course (3). 

• Major Music Lessons for five semesters: ten semester hours. 

• Music ensemble courses for seven semesters: seven semester hours. 

• Successfully perform at least a half recital. 

Total: 58 semester hours: *six of these may be counted toward the general college 
core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. 

• Courses in the general college core requirements prescribed for Special Area 
Teacher certification: BIO 101/103 (3/1); SCI 101 (2) and 102 (2), HIS 202, POL 
201 , PSY 223. 

• Professional Education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Semester: EDU 201 and 458 (2); ENG 363; MUS 459 (2); 

PSY 323 and 343. 

During the Professional Semester (Spring): EDU 443 (2), 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 (6). 

• Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0), 033 (0), 044 (0). 

• Complete all Entrance Criteria requirements listed below. 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional education 
course. Only the student who successfully completes all phases of the Entrance 
Criteria Program and meets all other department requirements can be permitted to 
enter pre-service teaching. 

Entrance Criteria Program 

The Entrance Criteria Program (ECP) is designed to screen candidates for 
teacher certification. This program requires data to demonstrate that the can- 
didate possesses the necessary competencies to be an effective teacher. 
There are specific time constraints on some of the requirements. The student 
is responsible for complying with all ECP guidelines. The student must suc- 
cessfully complete: 

Phase I: To be completed by the end of the Sophomore Year. 

Complete the requirements of the Comprehensive Musicianship Screening 

(as listed above) 
SAT Scores on file 
Strong Interest Inventory 
Declaration of Major 

EDU 01 1 Practicum and EDU 022 Practicum 
NTE Core Battery I and Core Battery II 
Probability of Success 
Student Advisement Document (Part A) 
Interview for Candidacy 

2.50 GPA on all courses attempted and in the major. 
Application to Teacher Education: Admission to candidacy for certification is 

contingent on successful completion of Phase I requirements. Upon 

admission to candidacy, a student may then register for upper-level (300- 

400) education courses. 



Communication, Performing and Visual Arts / 93 



Phase II: To be completed before the Professional Semester. 

EDU 033 Practicum and EDU 044 Teaching Skills Laboratory 

2.50 GPA on all course work attempted, all courses in the major, and on 

all professional education courses 

Application for Student Teaching 

Student Advisement Document (Part B) 

Successfully complete MUS 340, 341 , 350, 351 , 459 

Exit Interview (Music faculty) 

Departmental Recommendation for Student Teaching 
Phase III: To be completed by the end of the Senior Year. 

Student Teaching (minimum grade of "C") 
NTE Core Battery III Professional Knowledge and teaching Specialty 
Student Advisement Document (Part C) 
Application for Certification 

MUSIC RECORDING TECHNOLOGY (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Music courses: MUS 041 (1), 043 (1), 046 (1), 047 (1), 121, 122, 221, 222, *223, 
*224, 260, 340, 361 , 362, 460, 461 , 462 (4), 463 (2), 470 (6). 

• Major Music Lessons for four semesters: eight semester hours. 

• Music ensemble courses for four semesters: four semester hours. 

• Before entrance into the internship semester the student must attain a 2.50 GPA 
overall and in major courses, as well as pass an exit interview with the Music faculty. 

Total: 64 semester hours; *six of these may be counted toward the general college 
core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. 

MUSIC MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Music courses: MUS 121, 122, 223, 224. 

• Non-performance music elective: Choose one course (3). A course taken to satisfy 
The Humanities and Fine Arts component of the general college core requirements 
may not be used to satisfy this requirement. 

• Major Music Lessons for two semesters: four semester hours. 

• Music ensemble courses for two semesters: two semester hours. 
Total: 21 semester hours. 

Courses of Instruction: DRAWING 

ART 011. GENERAL DRAWING. 3. A survey of various materials and approaches 
applicable to drawing. Emphasis on the design elements and composition. Note: Six 
studio hours. Spring. 

ART 012. DRAWING: ANALYTICAL FIGURE. 3. An analytical approach to figure 
drawing and anatomy with emphasis on the live model. Various materials and tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: ART 01 1 . Note: Six studio hours per week. Spring, odd years. 

ART 013. DRAWING: EXPRESSIVE FIGURE. 3. Use of the figure or figural elements 
for expressive purposes. Models used. Various materials and techniques used 
experimentally. Prerequisite: ART 012. Note: Six studio hours per week. Spring, 
even years. 

ART 014. DRAWING: PERSPECTIVE AND RENDERING. 3. Development of skills of 
rendering and the principles of perspective in an analytical approach. Various mate- 
rials and techniques used. Prerequisite: ART 01 1 . Note: Six studio hours per week. 
Fall. 

ART 015. DRAWING: EXPERIMENTAL STYLE AND TECHNIQUE. 3. Emphasis on 
stylistic and/or expressive possibilities. Various materials, techniques and approach- 
es used. Prerequisite: ART 011. Note: Six studio hours per week. Spring, even 
years. 



94 / Communication, Performing and Visual Arts 



ART 016. DRAWING: ADVANCED I. 3. A continuation of one of the lower numbered 
drawing courses at a more advanced level and in greater depth. Prerequisite: ART 
01 2, 01 3, 01 4, or 01 5. Note: Six studio hours per week. 

ART 017. DRAWING: ADVANCED II. 3. A continuation of one of the lower numbered 
drawing courses (not used as a prerequisite for ART 016) at a more advanced level 
and in greater depth. Prerequisite: ART 012, 013, 014, or 015. Note: Six studio 
hours per week. 

Courses of Instruction: Painting 

ART 020. PAINTING: ACRYLICS. 3. The study of acrylic painting and the skills nec- 
essary for expressive problem solving. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Note: 
Six studio hours per week. 

ART 021. PAINTING: OILS. 3. The study of oil painting and the skills necessary for 
expressive problem solving. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Note: Six studio 
hours per week. Spring, even years. 

ART 022. PAINTING: WATERCOLOR. 3. The study of watercolor painting and the 
skills necessary for expressive problem solving. Prerequisite: Permission of instruc- 
tor. Note: Six studio hours per week. Spring, odd years. 

ART 023-26. PAINTING: ADVANCED. 3. The continued study of the skills and 
expressive problems of the painter. After fulfilling the prerequisite the student may 
select from acrylics (Prerequisite: ART 020), and/or oils (Prerequisite: ART 021), 
and/or watercolor (Prerequisite: ART 022). Note: Six studio hours per week. Fall, 
Spring. 

Courses of Instruction: SCULPTURE 

ART 030. SCULPTURE: INTRODUCTION. 3. Introduction to the fundamental process 
of sculpture. Projects, both objective and non-objective, using a variety of materials 
and techniques. Sculptural design, problem solving and aesthetics. Note: Six studio 
hours per week. Fall. 

ART 031. SCULPTURE: MODELING. 3. A concentration on sculptural possibilities 
using clay as the primary material. Problem solving, sculptural design and aesthetics 
stressed. Prerequisite: ART 030 or permission of instructor. Note: Six studio hours 
per week. Fall. 

ART 032. SCULPTURE: CARVING. 3. A concentration on the subtractive techniques 
of sculpture (stone, wood, plaster). Problem solving, sculptural design and aesthet- 
ics. Prerequisite: ART 030 or permission of instructor. Note: Six studio hours per 
week. Fall. 

ART 033. SCULPTURE: METALS. 3. A concentration on sculptural possibilities using 
metal (arc and gas welding, brazing and forging). Problem solving, sculptural design 
and aesthetics. Prerequisite: ART 030 or permission of instructor. Note: Six studio 
hours per week. Fall, alternate years. 

ART 034. SCULPTURE: ADVANCED METALS. 3. A continuation on sculptural possi- 
bilities of metal on an advanced level, with an emphasis on craftsmanship, aesthet- 
ics, experimentation and individuality. Prerequisite: ART 033 or permission of 
instructor. Note: Six studio hours per week. Fall, alternate years. ' 

ART 036. SCULPTURE: SKILL DEVELOPMENT. 3. A continuation of an advanced 
level of ART 031 , 032, 034, or 035. An emphasis on advanced techniques, problem 
solving and aesthetics. Prerequisite: ART 031 , for modeling continuation; ART 032, 
for carving continuation; ART 034, for metals continuation; ART 035, for foundry 
continuation. Note: Six studio hours per week. Fall, alternate years. 



Communication, Performing and Visual Arts / 95 



Courses of Instruction: CERAMICS 

ART 040. CERAMICS: INTRODUCTION. 3. Introduction to the fundamental process 
of ceramics; basic construction techniques (handbuilding and wheel throwing), glaz- 
ing, clay mixing and kiln firing. The aesthetics of ceramics. Note: Six studio hours 
per week. Materials fee collected. Fall, Spring. 

ART 041. CERAMICS: POTTER'S WHEEL. 3. A concentration on potter's wheel 
products with an emphasis on functional pieces, glazing, firing, craftsmanship and 
aesthetics. Prerequisite: ART 040 or permission of instructor. Note: Six studio 
hours per week. Materials fee collected. Fall, Spring. 

ART 042. CERAMICS: ADVANCED POTTER'S WHEEL. 3. A continuation of wheel 
techniques, on an advanced level, with an emphasis on craftsmanship and aesthet- 
ics. Ambitious and challenging products are required. Prerequisite: ART 041 or per- 
mission of instructor. Note: Six studio hours per week. Materials fee collected. Fall, 
Spring. 

ART 043. CERAMICS: HANDBUILDING. 3. A concentration on handbuilding tech- 
niques with an emphasis on craftsmanship, aesthetics or originality. Glazing/firing 
techniques. Prerequisite: ART 040 or permission of instructor. Note: Six studio 
hours per week. Materials fee collected. Fall, Spring. 

ART 044. CERAMICS: ADVANCED HANDBUILDING. 3. A contribution of handbuild- 
ing techniques on an advanced level, with an emphasis on craftsmanship, aesthet- 
ics and individuality. Prerequisite: ART 043 or permission of instructor. Note: Six 
studio hours per week. Materials fee collected. Fall, Spring. 

ART 045. CERAMICS: TECHNOLOGY. 3. A comprehensive study of glaze calcula- 
tions, clay body formulas and firing procedures. Problem solving and experimenta- 
tion. Prerequisite: ART 040 or permission of instructor. Note: Six studio hours per 
week. Materials fee collected. Fall. 

ART 047. CERAMICS: SKILL DEVELOPMENT. 3. A continuation on an advanced 
level of ART 042, 044, or 045. An emphasis on advanced techniques, problem solv- 
ing and aesthetics. Prerequisite: ART 042, 044, or 045. Note: Six studio hours per 
week. Materials fee collected. Fall, Spring. 

Courses of Instruction: COMMERCIAL DESIGN 

ART 050. COMMERCIAL DESIGN: INTRODUCTION TO LAYOUT, LETTERING 
AND TYPOGRAPHY. 3. Introduction to basic techniques, materials and methods of 
commercial design through an emphasis on designing with type, lettering for repro- 
duction and simple layout design. Prerequisite: ART 015 or permission of instruc- 
tor. Note: Six studio hours per week. Fall, Spring. 

ART 051. COMMERCIAL DESIGN: LOGO DESIGN, PROMOTIONAL ADVERTISING 
DESIGN, PRINTED ART PRODUCTION. 3. Development of various approaches to 
corporate symbol, institutional and product logo design. Practical use of logos in pro- 
motional advertising design. Introduction to printing processes. Basic preparation of 
art for reproduction. Prerequisite: ART 050 or permission of instructor. Note: Six 
studio hours per week. Fall, Spring. 

ART 052. COMMERCIAL DESIGN: TECHNICAL RENDERING, INTRODUCTION TO 
ADVERTISING LAYOUT, INTERMEDIATE PRINTED ART PRODUCTION. 3. Basic 
techniques of technical product rendering including linear perspective, line and con- 
tinuous tone rendering techniques, and the use of mechanical tone in rendering and 
illustration. Practical use of product rendering in ad layout and booklet design. 
Preparation of art for reproduction. Prerequisite: ART 050 or permission of instruc- 
tor. Note: Six studio hours per week. Fall, Spring. 



96 / Communication, Performing and Visual Arts 



ART 053. COMMERCIAL DESIGN: ILLUSTRATION FOR ADVERTISING, ADVER- 
TISING LAYOUT, ADVANCED PRINTED ART PRODUCTION. 3. Problems in 
advertising illustration. Practical use of product illustration in magazine and newspa- 
per advertising design. Advanced preparation of art for reproduction. Prerequisite: 
ART 050 or permission of instructor. Note: Six studio hours per week. Fall, Spring. 

ART 054. COMMERCIAL DESIGN: SPECIALTY ILLUSTRATION, LITERARY ILLUS- 
TRATION, FASHION ILLUSTRATION, JOURNALISM AND SPORTS ILLUSTRA- 
TION. 3. Problems in creative illustration for magazines, books, posters and album 
covers. Introduction to fashion illustration, sports and news journalism illustration. 
Prerequisite: ART 050 and permission of instructor. Note: Six studio hours per 
week. Fall, Spring. 

ART 055. COMMERCIAL DESIGN: BROCHURE/FOLDER DESIGN, PROMOTION- 
AL BOOKLET/TABLOID DESIGN, ANNUAL REPORT DESIGN. 3. Problems 
requiring both a traditional and contemporary approach to brochure/folder design. 
Creative approaches to promotional design engineering and layout (presentation, 
calendars, etc.). Experience in practical tabloid and annual report design. 
Prerequisite: ART 050 and permission of instructor. Note: Six studio hours per 
week. Fall, Spring. 

ART 056. COMMERCIAL DESIGN: PACKAGE DESIGN, LABEL DESIGN, PROD- 
UCT AND PROMOTIONAL DISPLAY DESIGN. 3. Problems in packaging and 
labelling a variety of products. Problems in creating displays for retailing. Institutional 
and product promotion. Prerequisite: ART 050 and permission of instructor. Note: 
Six studio hours per week. Fall, Spring. 

ART 057. COMMERCIAL DESIGN: ILLUSTRATION AND LAYOUT FOR TELEVI- 
SION/COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY, COMPUTER GRAPHICS FOR COMMER- 
CIAL DESIGN. 3. Practical problems in television storyboard development and 
design. Problems in television slide design. Introduction to computer graphics com- 
mercial design and applications. Problems in either television ad design/production 
or in commercial photography design/production. Prerequisite: ART 070 or 220, 
and permission of instructor. Note: Six studio hours per week. Fall, Spring. 

Courses of Instruction: PRINTMAKING 

ART 060. PRINTMAKING: INTRODUCTION. 3. An introduction to basic processes of 
printmaking including relief, intaglio, lithography, and silkscreen. An emphasis on the 
introduction to the technical processes and design elements. Prerequisite: ART 01 1 
or 105. Note: Six studio hours per week. Spring. 

ART 061. PRINTMAKING: RELIEF. 3. A study of relief techniques designed for 
expressive problem solving. Prerequisite: ART 060 and permission of instructor. 
Note: Six studio hours per week. Spring, odd years. 

ART 062. PRINTMAKING: SILKSCREEN. 3. A study of silkscreen techniques 
designed for expressive problem solving. Prerequisite: ART 060 and permission of 
instructor Note: Six studio hours per week. Spring, odd years. 

ART 063. PRINTMAKING: INTAGLIO. 3. An introduction to basic intaglio techniques 
designed for expressive problem solving. Prerequisite: ART 01 1 and permission of 
instructor. Note: Six studio hours per week. Spring, odd years. 

ART 064. PRINTMAKING: LITHOGRAPHY. 3. A study of lithography techniques, 
including multi-color printing, designed for expressive problem solving. 
Prerequisite: ART 060 and permission of instructor. Note: Six studio hours per 
week. Spring, odd years. 



Communication, Performing and Visual Arts/ 97 



ART 066. PRINTMAKING: ADVANCED STUDIES I. 3. An advanced concentrated 
study in printmaking techniques designed for expressive problem solving. 
Prerequisite: ART 060, 061 , 062 and either ART 063 or 064, and permission of 
instructor. 

ART 067. PRINTMAKING: ADVANCED STUDIES II. 3. An advanced concentrated 
study in printmaking techniques designed for expressive problem solving. 
Prerequisite: ART 060, 061 , 062 and either ART 063, 064, or 066, and permission 
of instructor. 

Courses of Instruction: PHOTOGRAPHY 

ART 070. PHOTOGRAPHY: BEGINNING. 3. Basic technical processes and use of 
basic equipment in black and white film and print production. An emphasis on maxi- 
mum technical control for archival photo production. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. Notes: Camera ownership required. Three studio hours and three lecture 
hours per week. Fall, Spring. 

ART 071. PHOTOGRAPHY: INTERMEDIATE. 3. Development of advanced technical 
control of black and white film and print production. Increased emphasis on creative 
use of photography for artistic expression and/or practical visual communications. 
Introduction to experimental techniques in film and print production. Prerequisite: 
ART 070 or permission of instructor. Notes: Camera ownership required. Two lec- 
ture hours and four studio hours per week. Fall, Spring. 

ART 072. PHOTOGRAPHY: ADVANCED. 3. Advanced problems in creative tech- 
niques for artistic expression and/or practical visual communications. Basic dark- 
room management. Introduction to color film making. Prerequisite: ART 070, 071 or 
permission of instructor. Notes: Camera ownership required. One lecture hour and 
five studio hours per week. Spring. 

ART 073. PHOTOGRAPHY: ALTERNATIVE PROCESSES. 3. Introduction to alterna- 
tive photographic processes. An in-depth study of one of the following processes: 
gum bichromate, gyanotype, gallidium, Van Dyke, or liquid emulsion. Prerequisite: 
ART 072 or permission of instructor. Notes: Camera ownership required. One lec- 
ture hour and five studio hours per week. Fall. 

ART 074. PHOTOGRAPHY: SKILL DEVELOPMENT. 3. A continuation of an 
advanced level of ART 070 or 071 . An emphasis is placed on advanced darkroom 
techniques, problem solving and aesthetics. Prerequisite: ART 070 or permission Of 
instructor. Notes: Camera ownership required. One lecture hour and five studio 
hours per week. Spring. 

ART 075. PHOTOGRAPHY: COMMERCIAL ASPECTS. 3. Exploration of commercial 
aspects of photography. Emphasis on lighting techniques as applied to portraiture 
and advertising. Prerequisite: ART 070. Note: Three lecture hours and three studio 
hours per week. 

Courses of Instruction: GENERAL VISUAL ARTS 

ART 078-079. INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS. 1, 2. or 3. Allows the student of art the 
experience of evolving a personal program of limited scope to be carried out with 
minimum faculty supervision. Individual programs chosen cooperatively by the stu- 
dent and the instructor with the approval of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: 
Course available only to students who meet the college requirements for indepen- 
dent study. Note: Instructor may require class attendance; otherwise the student 
works independently. 

ART 080. ART APPRECIATION: LECTURE. 3. Art theory and technique in the lan- 
guage of the visual arts. Overview of history of western art as related to cultural 



98 / Communication, Performing and Visual Arts 



development. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in The 
Humanities and Fine Arts. A student majoring or minoring in Art may use this course 
as an art elective only. Fall, Spring. 

ART 081. ART APPRECIATION: STUDIO. 3. Introduction to art through a study of the 
basic principles, procedures and materials of the studio arts. Lecture, demonstration 
and hands-on experiences employed. Note: Counts toward the general college core 
requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. 

ART 082. ART APPRECIATION: HONORS LECTURE. 3. An accelerated approach to 
the study of the language, theories and techniques of the Visual Arts. While an 
overview of the history of western art forms the basis of the course, additional expo- 
sure to art museums, selected exhibitions, working artists and art criticism receive 
special emphasis. Prerequisite: Admittance is limited to the student in the Honors 
Program, receiving an invitation, or successfully petition the Department. Notes: 
counts toward the general college core requirements in The Humanities and Fine 
Arts. The student is responsible for the cost of required field trip expenses. 

ART 083. STAINED GLASS. 3. An introduction to the fundamentals of stained glass. 
Glass fabricating techniques using lead came and copper foil. Traditional and innova- 
tive products with an emphasis on craftsmanship, design and aesthetics. 

ART 085. INTRODUCTION TO CRAFTS. 3. An introduction to the basic craft tech- 
niques while emphasizing sound design elements and principles. Projects explore 
selected media from fiber manipulation (batik, tie-dye, etc.), weaving (tapestry, bas- 
ketry, etc.), paper arts (paper making, marbelizing, etc.), and mixed media fabrication 
(fabricated jewelry, lost wax casting, etc.). Note: Six studio hours per week. 

ART 090. ART HISTORY I: ANCIENT THROUGH MIDDLE AGES. 3. A chronological 
study of the visual arts of the western world from Paleolithic through Gothic. Painting, 
sculpture, architecture emphasized. Note: Counts toward the general college core 

• requirements in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. Fall. 

ART 091. ART HISTORY II: RENAISSANCE THROUGH MODERN. 3. A chronological 
study of the visual arts of the western world from the foundation of the Renaissance 
through the modern period. Painting, sculpture, architecture emphasized. Note: 
Counts toward the general college core requirements in the Global and Cross- 
Cultural Perspective. Spring. 

ART 094. MUSEUM FIELD EXPERIENCE. 3. A study of the visual and/or decorative 
arts through both classroom and on-site experiences. Course includes some tangible 
academic and/or creative product related to the museum experience. Notes: Travel 
to specific museums and/or architectural works is required. Pre- and post-travel 
classroom work is required. The student is responsible for cost relating to the on-site 
experience. May be taken as ART 092 for one semester hour and as ART 093 for 
two semester hours. The specific course number (and corresponding credit hours) 
depends upon duration of experience and the complexity of the project (at least 15 
contact hours per credit hour). 

ART 095. AMERICAN MATERIAL CULTURE. 3. An interdisciplinary approach to the 
study of the physical object as fact from the beginning of the European influence in 
North America until the Industrial Revolution. Notes: Also listed as HIS 095. Historic 
site study in the region is required and the student is responsible for that expense. 

ART 096. RENAISSANCE ART. 3. A chronological study of the visual arts of the west- 
ern world from 1 300 to 1 600. 

ART 097. MODERN ART. 3. A study of the history and philosophic developments 
which have occurred in the major plastic-graphic arts since 1800. 



Communication, Performing and Visual Arts / 99 



ART 105. TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN. 3. Introduction to the fundamentals of two- 
dimensional design covering the plastic element and design principles. Study of 
materials, techniques and problems of composition. Note: Six studio hours per week. 
Fall. 

ART 106. THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN. 3. Introduction to the fundamentals of 
three-dimensional design. Material exploration, problem solving, creativity, aesthetics 
and design concepts are emphasized. Note: Six studio hours per week. Spring. 

ART 220. INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO PRODUCTION. 3. A detailed introduction to 
video production, including tape format, camera operation, VCR operation, 
monitor/receiver use, and lighting theory. Course is based on the systems approach 
to video production. Note: also listed as BRO 220. 

ART 373. PUBLIC SCHOOL ART LECTURE. 1. Investigation of the problems involved 
in art education at elementary school level. Prerequisite: Admission into the 
Teacher Education Program. Corequisite: ART 374. Fall. 

ART 374. PUBLIC SCHOOL ART STUDIO. 2. Studio component for ART 373. 
Corequisite: ART 373. Fall. 

ART 403-404. SPECIAL ART PROJECT I. 3. Allows the student in art the experience 
of evolving a personal program of limited scope to be carried out with minimum facul- 
ty supervision. The supervisor of any special art project must be approved in writing 
by the director of the area major, with the final decision to be made by the 
Department Chair. Notes: Should be taken only during the student's final two 
semesters. Instructor may require class attendance; otherwise student works inde- 
pendently. If a student is double majoring (emphasizing) within the Department, one 
special project will be taken in each emphasis. Fall, Spring. 

ART 459. INSTRUCTION DESIGN AND STRATEGIES. 2. A continuation of EDU 458 
designed to develop the student competency in the methods, materials, and activities 
appropriate for the teaching of art at the secondary level. Prerequisite: Open only to 
the student in the Professional Year. Fall. 

Courses of Instruction: BROADCASTING/VIDEO 

BRO 025. PRACTICAL BROADCAST PRODUCTION. 1. Credit given for active partic- 
ipation as a crew member in campus video production (sports telecasts, public affairs 
programs, special events). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Notes: Pass/Fail 
grading. Course may be taken for credit no more than six times. Fall, Spring. 

BRO 220. INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO PRODUCTION. 3. A detailed introduction to 
video production, studio directing, camera operation, VCR operation, switching, 
audio, and lighting theory. Course is based on the systems approach to video pro- 
duction. Prerequisite: COM 101. Note: Also listed as ART 220. Fall, Spring. 

BRO 320. BROADCAST SCRIPTWRITING. 3. An introduction to basic writing tech- 
niques and formats used in broadcasting. Attention given to newswriting, packaging, 
commercial writing, and writing under specific time restraints. Prerequisite: BRO 
220, JOU 213, or permission of instructor. Spring. 

BRO 420. BROADCAST JOURNALISM. 3. A study of television newsgathering and 
reporting with emphasis on electronic field production and news packaging. The 
course also provides students with practical experience in production of studio news- 
casts, and a detailed study of control room and post-production procedures. 
Prerequisite: BRO 320. Fall. 



100 / Communication, Performing and Visual Arts 



Courses of Instruction: COMMUNICATIONS 

COM 101. INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION. 3. An introductory study of 
the dynamics of mass communications with particular interest in the mass media 
(newspapers, magazines, film, radio, and television), and utilization of the media for 
effective communication. Fall, Spring. 

COM 321. PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC RELATIONS. 3. Introduction to the principles of 
public relations. It involves an understanding of the profession and practice of public 
relations. Special emphasis is given to organizational cultures, corporate image and 
identity, and non-profit organization. Course covers social, ethical, and legal issues 
related to public relations. Practical work in public relations is included. Prerequisite: 
Junior standing or permission of instructor. Fall. 

COM 350. HISTORY OF THE MASS MEDIA. 3. A study of the historical aspects of the 
mass media (newspapers, magazines, films, radio, and television), their develop- 
ment, and their role as forces of political, social, economic, and technical change in 
the twentieth century. Prerequisite: COM 101 for Communications majors. Spring. 

COM 441. ADVANCED APPLICATIONS IN PUBLIC RELATIONS. 3. This course 
goes beyond the fundamentals of public relations. Emphasized are actual applica- 
tions to the practice of public relations through extensive use of case studies and 
real-life situations. Practical work (e.g., development of a complex public relations 
plan, detailed publicity package) is included. Prerequisite: COM 321. 

COM 450. MASS MEDIA AND SOCIETY. 3. This course addresses the influence that 
the mass media has on society and vice versa. Important are economic, political, 
sociological, and technological forces. A significant portion of the course deals with 
legal and ethical issues facing the mass media. Prerequisite: COM 350 for 
Communications majors. 

COM 461. COMMUNICATIONS SENIOR SEMINAR. 3. Capstone course for all 
Communications majors. The course examines communication theories and method- 
ologies and how they apply to the student's focus (i.e., journalism, broadcasting, 
public relations). A course requirement is completion of a comprehensive, research- 
based project demonstrating the student's proficiency in a particular facet of commu- 
nication in selected media. Prerequisite: Senior Communications major. Fall. 

COM 481. SPECIAL STUDIES IN COMMUNICATIONS. 1, 2, or 3. Directed individual 
research in Communications, and Special Study in areas not covered by catalog 
course listings. Prerequisite: Completion of 62 hours with a 2.50 GPA. 

Courses of Instruction: DRAMA 

DRA 012. SPEECH. 3. Introduction to the fundamentals of voice and diction, and pub- 
lic speaking. Note: Also listed as ENG 012. Fall, Spring. 

DRA 013. THEATER APPRECIATION: SHOP. 3. Introduction to theater arts through 
study of basic design and use of sets, lights, props and sounds; and of construction 
and execution for actual presentation in Stage and Script performances. Also study 
of production techniques through history. Lecture, demonstration and hands-on 
experience employed. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in 
The Humanities and Fine Arts. Fall. 

DRA 016. THEATER PARTICIPATION. 1. Participation in directing, acting, production, 
and management of actual production. Note: Pass/Fail grading. Course may be 
taken up to six times. Fall, Spring. 

DRA 017. INTRODUCTION TO THE THEATER. 3. Designed to stimulate a more 
appreciative audience for the live theater. An overview of drama with special atten- 
tion given to production and literary values. Note: Counts toward the general college 
core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. Fall, Spring. 



Communication, Performing and Visual Arts/ 101 



DRA 110. BEGINNING ACTING. 3. Fundamentals of acting, progressing to study of 
techniques and styles. Fall. 

DRA 210. BEGINNING DIRECTING. 3. Fundamentals of performance and use of 
stage in dramatic action, rehearsal procedures, and dramatic analysis. Spring. 

DRA 314. MODERN DRAMA. 3. Historical and literary survey of theater from 1850 to 
the present. 

DRA 340. RADIO-TV ANNOUNCING. 3. A study of the voice as an instrument of 
expression, of common speech problems, of techniques in articulation and voice pro- 
duction, and of study of materials for oral presentation. Spring. 

Courses of Instruction: JOURNALISM 

JOU 021. PRACTICAL JOURNALISM. 1. Credit given for active participation on the 
staff of the College's student newspaper, The Collegiate. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the newspaper adviser. Notes: Course may be taken for credit no more than six 
times. Only three semester hours may be credited toward a major or minor in English 
or a Communications focus in Journalism. Fall, Spring. 

JOU 023. YEARBOOK PRODUCTION. 1. Credit given for active participation on the 
staff of the College's student yearbook, Pine Knot. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
yearbook adviser. Notes: Course may be taken for credit no more than six times. 
Fall, Spring. 

JOU 213. BEGINNING NEWSWRITING. 3. A study of the fundamentals and tech- 
niques of newswriting, including newsgathering, modern news style, feature maga- 
zine writing, and writing for broadcasting. Prerequisite: COM 101 for 
Communications majors and ENG 102 or 103 for all students. Fall. 

JOU 313. ADVANCED NEWSWRITING. 3. A study of more complex reporting tech- 
niques (e.g., interpretative, investigative) for specialized news operations, including 
political reporting, business reporting, science writing, editorial writing, etc. 
Prerequisite: JOU 213. Spring. 

JOU 314. EDITING. 3. A study of editorial functions with an emphasis on headline writ- 
ing, copy editing, and picture editing in relation to page make-up and design. 
Prerequisites: JOU 213 and ENG 102 or 103. Spring. 

JOU 415. LITERARY JOURNALISM. 3. A study of foremost American literary journal- 
ists, with individual student projects utilizing the tools of the reporter and the art of 
the fiction writer in producing a literary journalism magazine. Prerequisite: JOU 213. 

Courses of Instruction: MUSIC THEORY, HISTORY, AND LITERATURE 

MUS 090. MUSIC SURVEY. 3. Designed to acquaint the student with the art of music, 
its place in history and in contemporary life and thought; and to increase the capacity 
of the student for understanding and appreciating music. Note: Counts toward the 
general college core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. Fall, Spring. 

MUS 091. CONTEMPORARY MUSIC. 3. A study of twentieth century contemporary 
musical expression. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in 
The Humanities and Fine Arts. Spring. 

MUS 092. MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S CULTURES. 3. A course designed to acquaint 
the student with the traditional and folk music of the world's major cultures. Note: 
Counts toward the general college core requirements in the Global and Cross- 
Cultural Perspective. Fall, Spring. 

MUS 093. MUSIC IN AMERICA. 3. A historical and stylistic survey of developments in 
the music of America. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in 
The Humanities and Fine Arts. Fall. 



102 / Communication, Performing and Visual Arts 



MUS 099. COMPOSITION. 1. Individualized work done in varied styles and forms. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fall, Spring. 

MUS 121. MUSIC THEORY I. 3. A study of the elementary materials of music. 
Elementary harmony, part writing, sight singing, ear training, diction, keyboard har- 
mony. Note: Meets five times weekly. Fall. 

MUS 122. MUSIC THEORY II. 3. Second-semester continuation of MUS 121. 
Prerequisite: MUS 121 with at least a "C" grade and passing each of the component 
areas: theory, sight singing, dictation. Note: Meets five times weekly. Spring. 

MUS 221. MUSIC THEORY III. 3. Continuation of the study of the materials of music, 
harmony, part writing, sight singing, ear training, dictation, keyboard harmony. 
Prerequisite: MUS 122 with at least a "C" grade and passing each of the component 
areas: theory, sight singing, dictation. Fall 

MUS 222. MUSIC THEORY IV. 3. Second-semester continuation of MUS 221. 
Prerequisite: MUS 221 with at least a "C" grade and passing each of the component 
areas: theory, sight singing, dictation. Spring. 

MUS 223. HISTORY OF MUSIC I. 3. A comprehensive view of Western art music from 
its earliest known beginnings to the present time with emphasis on style characteris- 
tics and historical settings. Prerequisite: MUS 122 or permission of instructor. Note: 
Counts toward the general college core requirements in The Humanities and Fine 
Arts. Fall. 

MUS 224. HISTORY OF MUSIC II. 3. A second-semester continuation of MUS 224. 
Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in The Humanities and 
Fine Arts. Spring. 

MUS 260. ELECTRONIC MUSIC. 3. An examination of the development of electronic 
music from the earliest electronic production of music to the present technology. 
Individual projects will involve the creation and/or production of electronic composi- 
tions using various methods and levels of electronic music technology. 

MUS 322. COUNTERPOINT. 3. The study of contrapuntal techniques of the sixteenth 
century. Prerequisite: MUS 122. 

MUS 361. ACOUSTICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC I. 3. A 

study of musical behavior and the variables that affect that behavior. The hearing 
mechanism, room acoustics, and the psychology of our response to music including 
environmental, physical and psychological factors are examined. Fall. 

MUS 362. ACOUSTICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC II. 3. 

Second-semester continuation of MUS 361. Prerequisite: MUS 361. Spring. 

MUS 460. RECORDING TECHNIQUES. 3. Laboratory experience utilizing and com- 
paring the various recording techniques and the use of analog and digital equipment. 
Projects may involve recording for concerts, lectures, advertisements or other audio 
programs. Prerequisites: MUS 361 and 362. Corequisite: MUS 461. 

MUS 461. SOUND SYNTHESIS. 3. A study of the theoretical basis of sound production 
and synthesis including analog versus digital, DAT and direct-to-disc recording tech- 
niques, and FM and linear synthesis. Prerequisites: MUS 361 and 362. 
Corequisite: MUS 460. 

MUS 462. PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES. 4. Involvement in the production of audio 
programs. Participation in one major project as assistant producer and a second 
major project as producer. Prerequisites: MUS 460 and 461 . Note: Course to be 
taken in Internship Semester. 

MUS 463. STUDIO MANAGEMENT. 2. The examination of the business and ethical 
aspects of studio management and its relationship to the music industry. Note: 
Course to be taken in Internship Semester. 



Communication, Performing and Visual Arts / 103 



MUS 470. INTERNSHIP/INDEPENDENT PROJECT. 6. Option of being placed in an 
off-campus internship or of completing an on-campus independent project of compa- 
rable magnitude. The internship provides a supervised apprenticeship opportunity. 
The on-campus option consists of a major project requiring the production of profes- 
sional level recordings and/or audio program(s) for the College and/or local busi- 
nesses/organizations. Interaction with professionals and the business community 
required. Note: Course to be taken during the student's final semester. 

MUS 491. SPECIAL STUDIES IN MUSIC. 1, 2. or 3. Directed individual study in areas 
not covered by catalog course listings. Prerequisite: Permission of the Music facul- 
ty. Fall, Spring. 

Courses of Instruction: MUSIC EDUCATION 

MUS 041-042. PIANO CLASS. 1,1. Beginning piano instruction. 

MUS 043-044. VOICE CLASS. 1,1. Beginning vocal instruction. 

MUS 045. BOWED STRINGS CLASS. 1. The structure, use, techniques of playing, 
and care of the instrument. Emphasis placed upon basic understanding and tech- 
niques for effective teaching of the instrument. Fall. 

MUS 046. WOODWIND CLASS. 1. The structure, use, techniques of playing, and care 
of the instrument. Emphasis placed upon basic understanding and techniques for 
effective teaching of the instrument. Spring. 

MUS 047. BRASS CLASS. 1. The structure, use, techniques of playing, and care of 
the instrument. Emphasis placed upon basic understanding and techniques for effec- 
tive teaching of the instrument. Fall. 

MUS 048. PERCUSSION AND GUITAR CLASS. 1. The structure, use, techniques of 
playing, and care of the instrument. Emphasis placed upon basic understanding and 
techniques for effective teaching of the instrument. Spring. 

MUS 330. MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS AND METHODS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACH- 
ERS. 3. A course designed to help the student (1) develop functional music skills and 
knowledge and understanding of basic musical concepts, and (2) develop teaching 
methods and techniques for the purpose of using music in teaching other subjects in 
the elementary classroom. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Teacher Education 
Program. Fall, Spring. 

MUS 340. CONDUCTING AND ARRANGING I. 3. Designed to provide music conduct- 
ing and arranging skills necessary for directing school, civic, or church ensembles. 
Prerequisites: MUS 221, 222. Fall. 

MUS 341. CONDUCTING AND ARRANGING II. 3. Continuation of MUS 340. 
Prerequisite: MUS 340. Spring. 

MUS 350. TEACHING MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY GRADES. 3. Materials and pro- 
cedures for the teacher or supervisor of music in grades K-6. Discussion of a philos- 
ophy of music education applied through the development and in-class presentation 
of lesson plans and units. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Teacher Education 
Program. 

MUS 351. CHORAL AND INSTRUMENTAL METHODS. 3. Materials and procedures 
for the teacher or supervisor of choral and instrumental music programs. Includes 
administrative procedures, rehearsal, pedagogical and marching band charting tech- 
niques, and ensemble development. Prerequisite: MUS 350. 

MUS 459. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND STRATEGIES FOR MUSIC. 2. Course 
designed to complete the study of the K-12 Music Education Curriculum and to 
examine a number of special topics such as music for the special learner, and 
research strategies for the music classroom teacher. Prerequisite: EDU 458. 



104 / Communication, Performing and Visual Arts 



Courses of Instruction: ENSEMBLES. These courses may be repeated mul- 
tiple semesters for credit. Ensemble courses may not be challenged for credit. 

MUS 011. CHORAL ENSEMBLE. 1. Performance of sacred and secular music of all 
periods. The choir sings many performances off campus and makes a tour in the 
Spring. Prerequisite: Open to any student by audition. Note: Regular attendance at 
rehearsals and performances required. Fall, Spring. 

MUS 020. INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE. 1. Performance of varied styles of music. 
Prerequisite: Open to any student by audition. Note: Regular attendance at 
rehearsals and performances required. Fall, Spring. 

MUS 021. PIANO ACCOMPANYING. 1. Course designed to allow for the development 
of ensemble skills. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Fall, Spring. 

MUS 022. ORCHESTRA. 1. Appropriate orchestral repertoire of varied styles is per- 
formed. Prerequisite: Open to any student by audition. Notes: Regular attendance 
at rehearsals and performances is required. Admission to the orchestra may also 
include concurrent enrollment in Private Music Lessons. Fall, Spring. 

Private Lessons 

The performance of music is an essential and integral component of music study. The 
Music programs provide for the study and performance of music by the student who is 
a major or minor and also by the student who studies for personal enrichment. 

The student who intends to have music lessons count toward a major or minor should 
register for Major lessons numbered 001 through 008. The student registers for the 
same course each semester and must successfully complete the number of semester 
hours indicated for the specific degree program. Successful completion of a semester 
of study may be defined as having learned the repertoire and other materials assigned 
by the instructor and having received acceptable grades on lessons, recitals, and 
examinations. The student must successfully complete a proficiency examination each 
semester in order to receive a passing grade for the course. 

A student who is neither a music major nor a minor should register for Non-Major 
Lessons numbered 051 through 058 with the option of one or two semester hours of 
credit. Note: The student (without a music major or minor) wishing to enroll in piano 
and/or voice study at the beginning level should enroll in MUS 041-042 (Piano Class) 
or in MUS 043-044 (Voice Class), rather than in Non-Major Lessons. 

The student who registers for two semester hours of credit of Private Lessons will 
receive 50 minutes of individual instruction per week; for one semester hour of credit, 
25 minutes. The lessons continue for a minimum of 14 weeks of lessons in the semes- 
ter. Proficiency examinations are required only for Major Lessons. The student who 
registers for Major Lessons is also expected to participate in studio classes and to per- 
form for departmental recitals. The special fee for lessons is $200 for two semester 
hours of credit and $1 00 for one semester hour. Use of practice rooms and of many 
instruments is available at no additional cost. 

Regular practice is expected of all students. A general guideline is a minimum of five 
hours per week for one semester hour credit; 10 hours, for two semester hours. 

Courses of Instruction: MAJOR LESSONS. Courses designed primarily for 
music majors and minors. Advancement is measured by a proficiency exami- 
nation each semester. Courses may be repeated. Prerequisite: Acceptance 
as a Music major or minor or by permission of instructor. Note: Special fee. 
Fall, Spring. 

MUS 001. MAJOR PIANO LESSONS. 2. 
MUS 002. MAJOR VOICE LESSONS. 2. 



Communication, Performing and Visual Arts / 105 



MUS 003. MAJOR ORGAN LESSONS. 2 

MUS 004. MAJOR GUITAR LESSONS. 2. 

MUS 005. MAJOR BOWED STRINGS LESSONS. 2. 

MUS 006. MAJOR WOODWIND LESSONS. 2. 

MUS 007. MAJOR BRASS LESSONS. 2. 

MUS 008. MAJOR PERCUSSION LESSONS. 2. 

Courses of Instruction: NON-MAJOR LESSONS. Prerequisite: Enrollment by per- 
mission of instructor. Notes: Courses may be repeated. Special fee. Fall, Spring. 

MUS 051. NON-MAJOR PIANO LESSONS. 1 or 2. 

MUS 052. NON-MAJOR VOICE LESSONS. 1 or 2. 

MUS 053. NON-MAJOR ORGAN LESSONS. 1 or 2 

MUS 054. NON-MAJOR GUITAR LESSONS. 1 or 2. 

MUS 055. NON-MAJOR BOWED STRINGS LESSONS. 1 or 2. 

MUS 056. NON-MAJOR WOODWIND LESSONS. 1 or 2. 

MUS 057. NON-MAJOR BRASS LESSONS. 1 or 2. 

MUS 058. NON-MAJOR PERCUSSION LESSONS. 1 or 2. 



106 /Education 



EDUCATION 

Associate Professors: Carter, Dolman (Chair), Garber, McPherson 

Assistant Professor: Marshall, Mize 

Student Organizations: Educators of the Hearing Impaired Club, and Student National 
Education Association (SNEA). 

Note: All courses listed in the requirements are 3-hour courses except where noted 
with a number in parentheses. Each set of double course numbers represents a lec- 
ture course/laboratory (or studio) course combination. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (Kindergarten-Grade 6) MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIRE- 
MENTS: 

• 'Courses from the general college core requirements prescribed specifically for this 
major: BIO 101/103 (3/1), GEO 214, HIS 102 and 202, MAT 201, POL 201, PSY 
223, SCI 101 (2) and 102 (2). Choose one of the following: ART 080, 081, 090, 091; 
DRA017;MUS090, or 092. 

• Other prescribed courses: HIS 201 and 375. 

• Complete the courses in the selected Cognate Studies area. 

• Professional Education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Year: ART 373/374 (1/2); EDU 201 , 303, 361 ; HEA 330; 

MUS 330; PED 310; PSY 323 and 373. 
Professional Year Methods Block (Fall): EDU 423 (2), 425 (3), 433 (2), 452 (2); MAT 

492 (2). 
During the Professional Year (Spring): EDU 441 (2), 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 (6). 

• Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0), 033 (0), and 044 (0). 

• Complete the Entrance Criteria Program. 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional education 

course. 

Total: 86 semester hours; *29 hours of these count toward the general college core 

requirements. This total does not include courses required for the Cognate Studies. 

MIDDLE SCHOOL (Grade 6-9) EDUCATION MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• "Courses from the general education core prescribed specifically for this major: POL 
201, PSY 223, BIO 101/103 (3/1), SCI 101 (2) and 102 (2). 

• Complete the courses in two selected Cognate Studies area. 

• Professional Education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Semester: EDU 201 , 363, 448; PSY 323, 373. 

During the Professional Semester (Spring): EDU 442 (2), 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 (6). 

• Complete the Entrance Criteria Program. 

• Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0), 033 (0), and 044 (0). 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course, in a professional education 
course, or in a cognate studies area. 

Total: 41 semester hours: *14 hours of these count toward the general college core 
requirements. This total does not include courses required for the Cognate Studies. 

EDUCATION OF THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING (Kindergarten-Grade 12) 
MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• "Courses from the general education core prescribed specifically for this major: BIO 
101/103 (3/1), GEO 201, HIS 202, MAT 201, POL 201, PSY 223, SCI 101 (2) and 
102 (2). 

• Complete the courses in the selected Cognate Studies area. 

• Professional Education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Year: EDU 025 (2), 026 (2), 027 (2), 201, 202, 250, 351, 

353, 364; PSY 323 and 343. 

Professional Year Methods Block (Fall): EDU 423 (2), 430, 431 (4), 432, 433 (2); 



Education / 107 



MAT 492 (2). 

Professional Semester (Spring): EDU 436 (2), 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 (6). 

• Complete the Entrance Criteria Program. 

• Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0), 033 (0), and 044 (0). 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional education 

course. 

Total: 81 semester hours; *23 hours of these count toward the general college core 

requirements. This total does not include courses required for the Cognate Studies. 

Cognate Studies 

The North Carolina Task Force on Teacher Education recommends "that all 
undergraduate teacher education students in early childhood education, ele- 
mentary education, students in early childhood education, elementary educa- 
tion, middle grades education, and all other education degree programs also 
complete a second major in one of the basic academic disciplines in an inter- 
disciplinary major." 

American Studies Cognate Studies Requirements for Teachers: 

• History courses: HIS 201 , *202. 

• English course: choose ENG 301 or 302. 

• Geography course: GEO 320. 

• Political Science course: POL *201 . 

• Music course: MUS 093. 

• Double-listed courses: ART/HIS 095 and HIS/REL 314. 

• Choose one course from the following list: ENG 301 , 302, 408; ECO 334; 
RELVSOC 309; HIS 370, 430, 435, 440, 445. 

Total: 27 semester hours; *six of these hours also are counted in the require- 
ments for the Education Department majors listed above. 

Art Cognate Studies Requirements for Teachers: 

• Art courses: ART 01 1 , *081 , 090, 091 , 1 05 

• Choose one from each of the following groups of ART courses: 1 ) 030 or 
106; 2) 040 or 085; 3) 020 or 021 or 022; and 4) 060 or 070. 

Total: 27 semester hours; *three of these hours also may be counted toward 
the general education core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. 

English Cognate Studies Requirements for Teachers: 

• English course: ENG 204. 

• Speech course: DRA 012. 

• Choose one from each of the following groups of courses: 1) ENG 200 or 
205; 2) ENG 31 1 , 312, or 315; 3) JOU 213, ENG 020, 317, or 318. 

• Choose an American Literature (ENG) course from the 300- or 400-level. 

• Choose a British Literature (ENG) course from the 300- or 400-level. 

• Choose one Modern Language course. The student must take the course 
and not place out of it. 

• English elective course: choose one course. Middle School majors must 
take ENG 326 for this requirement category. 

Total: 27 semester hours. 

French/Spanish Cognate Studies Requirements for Teachers: 

• French or Spanish: FRE/SPA 101,1 02, 201 , 202, 301 , 325. 

• Electives from 300- or 400-level French or Spanish courses: choose six 
hours. 

Total: 24 semester hours. 

History Cognate Studies Requirements for Teachers: 

• History courses: HIS *1 01 (or *1 03), *1 02 (or *1 04), 201 , *202. 375. 



1 08 / Education 



• Electives from 300- or 400-level History courses: 12 hours. 

Total: 27 semester hours; *nine of these hours may also be counted toward 
the college general core requirements in Humanities. 

Mathematics Cognate Studies Requirements for Teachers: 

• Mathematics courses: MAT 1 06, 1 09, *201 , 209, 221 , 231 , 365. 

• Electives from Mathematics courses at the 200-level or above: choose six 
hours. Middle School majors must take MAT 305 and MAT 364 for this cat- 
egory. 

Total: 27 semester hours; *three of these hours may also be counted toward 
the college general core requirements in The Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics. 

Music Cognate Studies Requirements for Teachers: 

Music courses: MUS 121, 122, 221, *223, 224. 

Music Major Lessons: 6-8 hours. 

Music ensemble classes: 2 hours. 

Piano Class: MUS 041/042: 0-2 hours. 

Voice Class: MUS 043/043. 0-1 hours. 

°A student enrolled in Major Lessons in piano or organ will take eight hours 

of Major Lessons but does not enroll in Piano Class; a student enrolled in 

Major Lessons in voice will take eight hours of Major Lessons but does not 
enroll in Voice Class; any other student takes six hours of Major Lessons 
and two hours each of Piano Class and of Voice Class. All Major Lessons 
must be taken in one instrument (such as voice, piano, trumpet, etc.) 

• A student interested in pursuing the Music Teacher Certification Cognate 
Studies must successfully complete an entrance audition. Contact the 
Department of Communications, Performing, and Visual Arts. 

Total: 27-29 hours; *three of these hours may be counted toward the general 
college core curriculum in The Humanities and Fine Arts. 

Political Science Cognate Studies Requirements for Teachers: 

• Political Science courses: POL *201 , 202, 203, 301 , 302. 

• Electives in Political Sciences courses at the 300- and 400-level: 12 hours. 
Total: 27 semester hours; *three of these hours also are counted in the 
requirements for the Education Department majors listed above. 

Psychology Cognate Studies Requirements for Teachers: 

• Psychology courses: PSY *223, *323, 353, 357, 393, 413. Choose either 
*373 or 483. 

• Choose two courses from the following: PSY 112, 333, 343, 395, 397, 453, 
496. 

Total: 27 semester hours; *up to nine of these hours also are counted in the 
requirements for the Education Department majors. 

Religion/Philosophy Cognate Studies Requirements for Teachers: 

• Two Religion courses from the following*: REL 101, 1 02, 110. 

• One Biblical area REL course from the 300- or 400-level. 

• One course chosen from the following: REL 309, 314, 316, 319. 

• Choose one of the following courses: REL 321 or 322. 

• One Philosophy course from the following: PHI 201 , 21 1 , 212. 

• One Philosophy course chosen from the 300- or 400-level. 

• One elective course in either Religion or Philosophy. 

Total: 24 semester hours; *three of these hours count towards the general 
education core requirements in Humanities. 

Science Cognate Studies Requirements for Teachers: 

• General Science courses: SCI *102 (2), 301 (4). 



Education / 1 09 



• Biology courses: BIO *1 01/1 03 (3/1); 201/203 (3/1). 

• One Field Biology Institute course from the following: BIO 01 1 , 012 (3). 

• Chemistry courses: CHE 120/121 (3/1). 

• Physics courses: PHY 130/131 (3/1), 230 (4). 

Total: 29 semester hours; *six of these hours also are counted in the require- 
ments for the Education Department majors. 

Social Studies Cognate Studies Requirements for Teachers: 

• History courses: HIS *1 01 (or *1 03), *1 02 (or *1 04), 201 , *202. 

• Other courses: ECO 231 , *GEO 201 , *POL 201 , SOC 201 . 

• Electives in Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology at the 
300- or 400-level (9); Middle School majors must take HIS 375 for this catego- 
ry- 
Total: 33 semester hours; *15 of these hours count toward the general educa- 
tion core requirements. Some of these 15 hours also are counted in the 
requirements for the Education Department major. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Secondary Education majors (9-12) must meet the requirements and the Entrance 
Criteria Program listed in the following departments; 

• Biology (See Department of Biological and Physical Sciences) 

• English (See Department of English and Modern Languages) 

• Social Studies (See Department of History, Social Sciences, and Social Work) 

• Mathematics (See Department of Mathematics) 

SPECIAL SUBJECT EDUCATION 

Special Subject (K-12) majors must meet the requirements and the Entrance Criteria 
Program listed in the following departments: 

• Art (See Department of Communication, Performing and Visual Arts) 

• French (See Department of English and Modern Languages) 

• Music (See Department of Communication, Performing and Visual Arts) 

• Physical Education (See Department of Physical Education and Sports Science) 

• Spanish (See Department of English and Modern Languages) 

Entrance Criteria Programs 

The Entrance Criteria Program (ECP) is designed to screen candidates for 
teacher certification. This program requires data to demonstrate that the can- 
didate possesses the necessary competencies to be an effective teacher. 
There are specific time constraints on some of the requirements. The student 
is responsible for complying with all ECP guidelines. The student must suc- 
cessfully complete: 

Phase I: To be completed by the end of the Sophomore Year. 

SAT Scores on file 

Strong Interest Inventory 

Declaration of Major and Cognate Studies 

EDU 01 1 Practicum and EDU 022 Practicum 

NTE Core Battery I (General Knowledge) and Core Battery II 
(Communication Skills) 

Probability of Success Form 

Student Advisement Document (Part A) 

2.50 cumulative GPA on all courses attempted 

Application to Teacher Education: Admission to candidacy for certifica- 
tion is contingent on successful completion of Phase I requirements. 
Upon admission to candidacy, a student may then register for upper-level 



110/ Education 



(300-400) education courses. 
Phase II: To be completed by the end of the Junior Year. 

EDU 033 Practicum 
2.50 GPA (maintained) 
Application for Student Teaching 

Student Advisement Document (Part B) 

Sign Proficiency (Education of The Deaf and Hard of Hearing majors) 
Phase III: To be completed by the end of the Senior Year. 

EDU 044 Teaching Skills Laboratory 

Department Recommendation for Student Teaching 

Student Teaching (minimum grade of "C") 

NTE Core Battery III Professional Knowledge and Teaching Specialty 

Student Advisement Document (Part C) 

Application for Certification 

EARLY TERMINATION OF STUDENT TEACHING 

There are times when it is in the best interest of the public school system and the 
College that a student teacher be removed from the classroom prior to the completion 
of the student teaching program. The Director of Field Experience, the college supervi- 
sor, the public school supervisor, and the principal of the public school must be in 
agreement that this is the proper thing to do. 

Formal procedures to terminate a student teaching assignment shall begin with the 
Director of Field Experience who must inform the student, in writing, the date that stu- 
dent teaching will end and the specific reasons for such actions. Copies of the letter 
shall be sent to the college supervisor, the public school supervisor, the principal of the 
public school, the student teacher's department chair, the Director of Teacher 
Education, and the Dean of the College. 

A student who feels that this decision is improper and is unable to resolve the issue 
through discussion with the parties involved, may appeal by submitting a written letter 
to the Director of Teacher Education within two school days. The letter should state 
precisely why the decision to terminate the student teaching is unjust. The Teacher 
Education Committee shall serve as a hearing board for such an appeal. 

During the formal hearing the student is entitled to the following due process rights: 

• To be present at all formal hearings. 

• To be represented by an advisor. The student may seek from within the college 
community of students, faculty, administrators, and staff, a person willing to act an 
advisor. An attorney may not represent parties in these proceedings. 

• To cross examine anyone making statements to the hearing board. 

Upon hearing the arguments from the parties involved, the Teacher Education 
Committee may take one of the following actions: 

• Uphold the decision to terminate student teaching. 

• Overturn the decision to terminate student teaching. 

• Overturn the decision to terminate student teaching, and ask the Director of Field 
Experience to reassign the student to another classroom. 

The records of the Teacher Education Committee concerning this case shall be on file 
in the office of the Director of Field Experience for a period of five years. Members of 
the Committtee shall observe strict confidentiality regarding the case. 

NATIONAL TEACHER EXAMINATION 

Each student seeking teacher certification in North Carolina must take all four core bat- 
teries of the National Teacher Examination (NTE) and must meet the state-required 
minimum score. Core Battery I and II (General Knowledge and Communication Skills) 



Education / 111 



must be taken by the end of the Sophomore year and Core Battery III and IV 
(Professional Knowledge and Teaching Specialty) during the professional semester in 
the senior year. Registration forms are available in the Department of Education. All 
NTE scores must be sent to the Director of Teacher Education. 

APPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATION 

The application form for a North Carolina Class "A" teaching certificate must be filled 
out during the professional semester. The form must be returned to the Director of 
Teacher Education accompanied by a check to cover the North Carolina certification 
fee. A student desiring teaching certification in another state must assume personal 
responsibility for providing the necessary application forms to the Director of Teacher 
Education. 

COLLEGE GRADUATES SEEKING CERTIFICATION ONLY 

The certification-only student must generally meet the same standards as the degree- 
seeking student. However, a student who graduated from an accredited college or uni- 
versity at least two years prior to applying to the Teacher Education Program at Barton 
College can be admitted with the following conditions: 

• Have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.30. 

• Have passing scores on the General Knowledge and Communication Skills sections 
of the National Teacher Examination. 

• Must repeat any course in the major or in professional education in which a grade of 
"D" was earned. 

• Must attain a grade point average of at least 2.50 in 1 5 semester hours of course 
work prior to the professional semester. 

Courses of Instruction: TEACHER EDUCATION FIELD EXPERIENCES 

EDU 011 PRACTICUM: INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING. 0. Designed to provide an 
orientation to the public school for prospective majors in teacher education. Students 
will be assigned to a public school classroom on a grade level and/or in a subject 
area appropriate to their indicated interest. A minimum of 15 hours observation in 
the assigned classroom required. Specific observation assignments are given by a 
faculty member. The student keeps a journal and is encouraged to meet with the 
faculty member for feedback and discussion of the field experience. Note: Pass/Fail 
grading. Fall, Spring. 

EDU 022 PRACTICUM: HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. 0. Designed to 
provide the teacher education candidate with the opportunity to observe students in 
a regular educational environment, with special emphasis on exceptional children. 
Students will be assigned to a special education classroom (whenever possible) on 
a grade level and/or in a subject area appropriate to their major. A minimum of 24 
hours observation in the assigned classroom required. Prerequisite: EDU 011. 
Corequisite: PSY 323. Note: Pass/Fail grading. Fall, Spring. 

EDU 033. PRACTICUM; READING LAB. 0. Designed to provide the teacher educa- 
tion candidate with a supervised laboratory experience including both observation 
and participation. Prerequisites: EDU 022, and admission into the Teacher 
Education Program. Corequisites: Course must be taken concurrently with EDU 
361 , 363, or 364. Notes: The student is assigned to a local classroom on a grade 
level and/or in a subject area appropriate to student's major. Minimum of 30 hours of 
observations and participation in the assigned classroom required. Pass/Fail grad- 
ing. Fall, Spring. 

EDU 044. PRACTICUM: TEACHING SKILLS LAB. 0. Designed to provide the 
teacher education candidate with a supervised laboratory experience involving 



112 /Education 



active participation in the classroom where that student will be assigned for student 
teaching. The candidate may work with individual students, small groups, or with the 
entire class. Prerequisites: EDU 033, and admission to the Professional Block. 
Notes: Minimum of 30 hours of observation and participation in the assigned class- 
room required. Pass/Fail grading. Fall. 

Courses of Instruction: GENERAL EDUCATION 

EDU 201. FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION. 3. An introduction to the study of public 
and nonpublic education systems, past and present, in the United States and in 
other civilizations. Emphasis on problems, issues, and trends in contemporary 
American education as viewed from historical, philosophical, sociological, and eco- 
nomic perspectives. Fall, Spring. 

EDU 223. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 3. A study of the principles of human 
behavior as they apply to the learning process. Note: Also listed as PSY 223. Fall, 
Spring. 

EDU 303. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE K-6. 3. A survey of literature appropriate for 
students in the elementary school. Fall, Spring. 

EDU 310. PHYSICAL EDUCATION OF CHILDREN GRADES K-6. 3. A study of the 
philosophical base and conceptual framework from which the elementary school 
physical education curriculum can be developed and evaluated. Includes principles 
of motor learning, mechanical principles, and teaching styles. Movement experi- 
ences include learning, teaching, participation in general and personal space aware- 
ness, mimetics and story plays, singing games, manipulative activities, stunts and 
tumbling, games of lower organization, relays, folk dance, rhythms, and lead-ups to 
sports skills. Other topics include effective class management, human wellness con- 
cepts, programs for children with special needs, teacher responsibilities, and legal 
liability. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. Note: Also 
listed as PED 310. Fall. 

EDU 323. PSYCHOLOGY OF THE EXCEPTIONAL INDIVIDUAL. 3. An introduction 
to the study of special education with emphasis on mental retardation, learning dis- 
abilities, visual and hearing impairments, behavioral and emotional disorders, and 
the academically gifted. Examination of methods of aiding exceptional individuals 
including screening and identification, assessment, techniques of systematic instruc- 
tion and behavior change, early intervention, public school services, and residential 
alternatives. Prerequisite: PSY 110, 112, or 223. Corequisite: EDU 022. Note: 
Field trips required. Also listed as PSY 323. 

EDU 330. MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS AND METHODS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACH- 
ERS. 3. A course designed to help the student (1) develop functional music skills 
and knowledge and understanding of basic musical concepts, and (2) develop 
teaching methods and techniques for the purpose of using music in teaching other 
subjects in the elementary classroom. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher 
Education Program. Note: Also listed as MUS 330. Fall, Spring. 

EDU 332. HEALTH, SAFETY AND FIRST AID FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 3. 

Acquisition of health and safety information which are pertinent to elementary school 
children. Includes identification of specific responsibilities of the elementary school 
educator for protecting and improving the health of school children. Exploration of 
elementary school health and safety curriculum and services. Prerequisite: 
Admission into the Teacher Education Program. Note: Also listed as HEA 330. Fall. 

EDU 361. ELEMENTARY READING. 3. A survey of current trends, practices, pro- 
grams, and methods structured to give practical assistance in the teaching of read- 
ing in the elementary school. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education 
Program. Note: Laboratory required. Fall, Spring. 



Education / 113 



EDU 363. READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS: SECONDARY AND SPECIAL SUB- 
JECTS. 3. Materials, methods and techniques to aid the classroom teacher in recog- 
nition of and the handling of adolescent reading problems, developmental and reme- 
dial. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. Note: Also listed 
as ENG 363. Fall, Spring. 

EDU 373. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY (INCLUDING MIDDLE CHILD). 3. A detailed study 
of the physical and psychological development of the child. Prerequisite: PSY 110, 
1 12, or 223. Note: Also listed as PSY 373. Fall, Spring. 

EDU 377. MIDDLE SCHOOL CHILD. 3. An examination of the physical, cognitive, and 
affective-social development of the middle school child within the context of the gen- 
eral theories and principles of child and adolescent development. Special focus on 
the education implications of this transitional period of development. Prerequisites: 
PSY 223. Fall. 

EDU 423. SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 2. Content and meth- 
ods designed for mastery of knowledge, understanding, skills, and types of planning 
essential for interdisciplinary instruction in the broad social science fields basic to 
the elementary school social studies curriculum. Note: Open only to students in the 
Professional Year. Fall. 

EDU 425. CREATIVE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM. 3. Exploration of 
procedures for incorporating creative arts (arts, music, creative drama, and move- 
ment) into the total curriculum in grades K-6 through hands-on teaching activities. 
Note: Open only to students in the Professional Year. Fall. 

EDU 433. SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL K-6. 2. Content and methods 
for teaching science knowledge and concepts beginning with the everyday environ- 
ment of the child and leading to an understanding of the basic ideas around which 
the fields of science are structured. Note: Open only to students in the Professional 
Year. Fall. 

EDU 434. INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA. 3. Importance of media in the processes of 
teaching and learning. Audio-visual equipment and instructional modes for media 
utilization. 

EDU 441. THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL K-6. 2. A study of the curriculum organiza- 
tion in the elementary school. Notes: Laboratory required. Open only to the 
Professional Year student. Spring. 

EDU 442. THE MIDDLE SCHOOL 6-9. 2. A study of the curriculum and organization in 
the middle school with special emphasis on understanding the adolescent learner. 
Note: Open only to the Professional Year student. Spring. 

EDU 443. THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 9-12/K-12. 2. A study of the curriculum, orga- 
nization, and daily operation of the secondary school. Note: Open only to the 
Professional Year student. Spring. 

EDU 448. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND STRATEGIES 6-9. 3. Designed to be a 
competency-based approach to teaching methodology for middle school majors. 
Development of teaching competencies in each of the student's academic concen- 
tration^) required. Note: Open only to the Professional Year student. Fall. 

EDU 451. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. 2. Designed to help pre-service teachers to 
better understand the complex theories and practices related to effective classroom 
management and effective classroom discipline. Note: Open only to the 
Professional Year student. Spring. 

EDU 452. LANGUAGE ARTS K-6. 2. Materials and methods for teaching language 
arts skills in grades K-6. Emphasis on current trends and practices. Note: Open only 
to the Professional Year student. Fall. 



114/ Education 



EDU 453. TESTING AND MEASUREMENT. 2. Designed to provide pre-service teach- 
ers with knowledge and skills necessary for designing and evaluating tests. 
Emphasis placed on classroom test development, the interpretation of test scores, 
test analysis and evaluation, and standardized tests. Note: Open only to the 
Professional Year student. Spring. 

EDU 458. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND STRATEGIES K-12/9-12. 3. Designed to 
be a competency-based approach to teaching methodology appropriate to all disci- 
plines. Ends at midterm. Note: Appropriate to all disciplines. Ends at midterm. Open 
only to the Professional Year student. Fall. 

EDU 470. STUDENT TEACHING. 6. Twelve weeks of full-time supervised student 
teaching in the public schools. Notes: Open only to the student majoring in 
Elementary Education, Middle School Education, Education of the Hearing Impaired, 
Secondary Education (English, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies) and 
Special Subjects (Art, Foreign Language, Music, and Physical Education). Open 
only to the Professional Year student. Spring. 

EDU 490. INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION. 1, 2, or 3. Individual study 
offered only to the student who has demonstrated the academic ability to work inde- 
pendently. An individual research problem is chosen cooperatively by the student 
and instructor in the Department of Education in the area of the student's profession- 
al interest. Prerequisite: Approval by the Chair of the Department of Education. 
Fall, Spring. 

EDU 492. MATHEMATICS K-6. 2. A study of the methods, materials, and activities 
used in teaching mathematics in grades K-6. Methods based on recent scientific 
studies to introduce as early as possible important concepts and vocabulary dealing 
with sets, numbers and geometry. Prerequisite: MAT 100-101 (or MAT 102) and 
201 . Note: Also listed as MAT 492. Fall. 

Courses of Instruction: EDUCATION OF THE DEAF AND 

HARD OF HEARING 

EDU 025. BASIC SIGN LANGUAGE. 2. A study of manual methods of communicat- 
ing with the deaf people, with special reference to educational settings. The develop- 
ment of receptive and expressive signing and fingerspelling skills is emphasized. 
Note: No previous experience with sign language required. Fall, Spring. 

EDU 026. INTERMEDIATE SIGN LANGUAGE. 2. Sign language and fingerspelling 
skill building at the intermediate level, with special reference to educational settings. 
Course emphasizes the development of vocabulary, fluency, clarity, accuracy, and 
receptive abilities. Prerequisite: EDU 025. Fall, Spring. 

EDU 027. ADVANCED SIGN LANGUAGE. 2. Development of sign language and fin- 
gerspelling receptive and expressive skills at the advanced level, with emphasis on 
conceptual accuracy and flexibility of language modes. Prerequisite: EDU 026. Fall. 

EDU 202. EDUCATIONAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF DEAF- 
NESS. 3. An introduction to the education and research involving the deaf and hard 
of hearing population. Course covers the cognitive, psychological, and emotional 
characteristics of the deaf and hard of hearing child and the techniques used in 
assessing these areas. The history of education of the deaf and hard of hearing chil- 
dren in the United States, including the variety of services now available, also exam- 
ined. Fall. 

EDU 250. INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH SCIENCE. 3. A study of the characteristics 
of normal speech, with emphasis on the anatomy and physiology of the vocal mech- 
anism, the nature of the English speech sounds, the production of speech sounds, 
and the prosodic elements of connected speech. Course provides basic skills in use 
of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Spring. 



Education / 1 15 



EDU 351. INTRODUCTION TO HEARING SCIENCE. 3. A study of the anatomy and 
physiology of the hearing mechanism, procedures for the assessment of hearing, 
sites of lesion and etiology of hearing loss, and the reading and interpreting of audio- 
metric evaluations. The use of hearing aids also examined. Fall. 

EDU 353. LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT AND LINGUISTICS. 3. A study of language 
and linguistic theory, with emphasis on the natural development of language in chil- 
dren. Spring. 

EDU 364. TEACHING READING TO THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING. 3. A 

study of techniques used to teach reading to deaf and hard of hearing children. The 
course includes a survey of current theories and practices in reading instruction for 
hearing children, as well as methods for diagnosing reading problems in deaf and 
hard of hearing children. Spring. 

EDU 430. TEACHING LANGUAGE TO THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING K-12. 

3. A study of the principles and techniques of teaching language to the deaf and 
hard of hearing child. Course includes a survey of current practices in language 
instruction for deaf and hard of hearing children. Diagnosis and remediation of indi- 
vidual language problems also stressed. Note: Open only to the Professional Year 
student. Fall. 

EDU 431. TEACHING ORAL/AURAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS TO DEAF AND 
HARD OF HEARING CHILDREN K-12. 4. A study of methods of teaching the deaf 
and hard of hearing children to communicate through an integration of spoken lan- 
guage, the use of residual hearing, and speechreading. Care and use of auditory 
training equipment, methods for improving speechreading, and the Ling speech 
method included in this course. Note: Open only to the Professional Year student. 
Fall. 

EDU 432. METHODS OF TEACHING SCHOOL SUBJECTS TO THE DEAF AND 
HARD OF HEARING 7-12. 3. A study of techniques for instructing deaf and hard of 
hearing children in upper-level subjects, grades 7-12. Instructional models found in 
mainstream settings as well as residential programs are included. Note: Open only 
to the Professional Year student. Fall. 

EDU 436. SCHOOL CURRICULUM FOR THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING 
K-12. 2. A review of program designs for public and residential deaf and hard of 
hearing settings and an examination of the requirements imposed by state and fed- 
eral legislation. Professional opportunities and settings available to a teacher of the 
deaf and hard of hearing are examined. Note: Open only to the Professional Year 
student. Spring. 



116/ English and Modern Languages 



ENGLISH AND MODERN LANGUAGES 






Professors: Grimes, James (Chair) 

Associate Professors: Fukuchi, Marshall, Montano, Scriven, Smith, Whelan 

Student Organizations: English Club, International Club. 

Note: All courses listed in the requirements are 3-hour courses except where noted 
with a number in parentheses. Each set of double course numbers represents a lec- 
ture course/laboratory course combination. 

ENGLISH MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• English courses: ENG *204; *200 or *205; 303; 304; 307 or 308. 

• Speech course: DRA 012. 

• Pre-Nineteenth Century literature course: choose one from ENG 301 , 400, °402, 
°403. °Choose one of these seminar courses only if the period of the seminar is pre- 
Nineteenth Century. 

• Nineteenth or Twentieth Century literature course: choose one from ENG 302, °402, 
°403, 406.°Choose one of these seminar courses only if the period of the seminar is 
the Nineteenth or Twentieth Century. 

• Writing course: choose one from JOU 213, ENG 020, 317, or 318. 

• Elective courses - choose two (six hours) from the following: ENG 206, 207, 208, 
300, 312, 315, 326, 481; DRA 110, 210, 310, 313, 314; JOU °021, 313, 314, 415. 
Any course listed elsewhere in the requirements for this major may be chosen as an 
elective if it is not used to satisfy another category. This 1-hour course may be 
taken up to three times. 

• No more than three 200-level English courses may count toward the major. 

• Modern Language courses: Two courses at the intermediate level (*201 and *202). 
Total: 39 semester hours; *as many as 12 of these may be counted toward both the 
general college core requirements and the English major. 

ENGLISH MAJOR (B.A.) TEACHER CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: 

• Requirements within the English major: 

English courses: ENG *204; *200 or *205; 307 or 308; 301 or 302 or 408; 31 1 or 

312; 315; 317 or 318. 
Speech course: DRA 012. 
English electives: nine hours (six of these must be taken in two periods prior to the 

twentieth century). 
Modern Language courses: Two courses at the intermediate level (*201 and *202). 
Total: 39 semester hours required for completion of the English major; *nine hours of 
these may be counted toward the general college core requirements. In addition, the 
student must complete the following requirements for Teacher Certification: 

• Courses in the general college core requirements prescribed for Secondary-level 
teacher certification: BIO 101/103 (3/1), HIS 202, POL 201, PSY 223, SCI 101 (2) 
and 102 0. 

• Professional Education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Semester: EDU 201 , 363, 458 (2); ENG 459 (2); PSY 323 

and 483. 

During the Professional Semester: EDU 443 (2), 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 (6). 

• Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0), 033 (0), 044 (0). 

• Complete the Entrance Criteria Program. 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional education 
course. Only the student who successfully completes all phases of the Entrance 
Criteria Program and meets all other department requirements can be permitted to 
enter pre-service teaching. 



English and Modern Languages / 117 



Entrance Criteria Program 

The Entrance Criteria Program (ECP) is designed to screen candidates for 
teacher certification. This program requires data to demonstrate that the can- 
didate possesses the necessary competencies to be an effective teacher. 
There are specific time constraints on some of the requirements. The student 
is responsible for complying with all ECP guidelines. The student must suc- 
cessfully complete: 

Phase I: To be completed by the end of the Sophomore Year. 

SAT Scores on File 

Strong Interest Inventory 

Declaration of Major 

EDU 01 1 Practicum and EDU 022 Practicum 

NTE Core Battery I and Core Battery II 

Probability of Success Form 

Program Projection 

Student Advisement Document (Part A) 

Interview for Candidacy 

2.50 GPA on all courses attempted 

38 semester hours passed 

Application to Teacher Education: Admission to candidacy for certification is 
contingent on successful completion of Phase I requirements. Upon 
admission to candidacy, a student may then register for upper-level (300- 
400) education courses: 
Phase II: To be completed by the end of the Junior Year. 

EDU 033 Practicum 

2.50 GPA maintained on all course work attempted. 

Departmental Examination (two-hour written examination on language 
acquisition) 

Demonstration Lesson 

Departmental Interview 

Application to Student Teaching 

Student Advisement Document (Part B) 

Departmental Recommendation for Professional Year 
Phase III: To be completed by the end of the Senior Year. 

EDU 044 Teaching Skills Laboratory 

Student Teaching (minimum grade of "C") 

NTE Core Battery III Professional Knowledge and Teaching Specialty 

2.50 GPA 

Student Advisement Document (Part C) 

Application for Certification 
Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional 
education course. 

English Endorsement (Secondary Level) Requirements: 

• Eng 1 01 and 1 02 or 1 03; 204; 200 or 205; 31 7 or 31 8. 

• Speech course: DRA 012. 

• English electives: Choose two courses from selected English, Drama, and 
Journalism. 

Total: 24 semester hours. 

ENGLISH MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• English courses: ENG 1 01 , 1 02 or 1 03, 204, 200 or 205. 

• Electives: choose 12 hours from selected courses in English, Drama, and 
Journalism. 

No more than three courses at the 200-level may count toward this minor. 
Total: 24 semester hours. 



118/ English and Modern Languages 



FRENCH/SPANISH MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Courses to be taken in appropriate language: French or Spanish. 

• *Elementary-level and intermediate-level modern language courses: FRE/SPA 101, 
102,201,202. 

• Other required courses: FRE/SPA 301 , 302, 303, 31 1 or 312, 325. 

• Elective courses at 300 or 400 level: Nine hours. 

• Majors are urged to include a second modern language as a related field. 

• Native speakers of the language in which they are majoring are exempt and exclud- 
ed from the elementary, intermediate and conversation courses in that language. 
They must take an additional course specified by the department in lieu of the con- 
versation course. No credit is given for this exemption. 

Total: 36 semester hours; *six of these may be counted toward the general college 
core requirements in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. 

FRENCH/SPANISH MAJOR (B.A.)/TEACHER CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: 

• The requirements for the French/Spanish (B.A.) major listed above. 

Total: 36 semester hours; *six of these may be counted toward the general college 
core requirements in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. In addition, the stu- 
dent must complete the following requirements for Teacher Certification: 

• Courses in the general college core requirements prescribed for Special Area 
teacher certification: BIO 101/103 (3/1), HIS 202, POL 201, PSY 223, SCI 101 (2) 
and 102 (2;. 

• Professional education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Semester: EDU 201, 361 (or 363), 458 (2); FRE/SPA 459 
(2); PSY 243 and 323. 

During the Professional Semester: EDU 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 (6); and one of the fol- 
lowing: EDU 441 (2), 442 (2), or 443 (2). 

• Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0), 033 (0), 044 (0). 

• Complete the Entrance Criteria Program listed below. 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional education 
course. Only the student who successfully completes all phases of the Entrance 
Criteria Program and meets all other department requirements can be permitted to 
enter pre-service teaching. 

Entrance Criteria Program 

The Entrance Criteria Program (ECP) is designed to screen candidates for 
teacher certification. This program requires data to demonstrate that the can- 
didate possesses the necessary competencies to be an effective teacher. 
There are specific time constraints on some of the requirements. The student 
is responsible for complying with all ECP guidelines. The student must suc- 
cessfully complete: 

Phase I: To be completed by the end of the Sophomore Year. 

SAT Scores on file 

Strong Campbell Interest Inventory 

Declaration of Major 

EDU 01 1 Practicum and EDU 022 Practicum 

NTE Core Battery I and Core Battery II 

Probability of Success Form 

Program Projection 

Student Advisement Document (Part A) 

Interview for Candidacy 

2.50 GPA on all courses attempted 

Application to Teacher Education: Admission to candidacy for certification is 
contingent on successful completion of Phase I requirements. Upon 
admission to candidacy, a student may then register for upper-level 






English and Modern Languages / 119 



(300-400) education courses. 
Phase II: To be completed by the end of the Junior Year. 

EDU 033 Practicum 

2.50 GPA on all course work attempted; on all courses in the major; on all 
professional education courses 

Proficiency Language Exams (oral and written) 

Initiation of a Professional Portfolio 

Video-taped Lesson 

Application for Student Teaching 

Student Advisement Document (Part B) 
Phase III: To be completed by the end of the Senior Year. 

EDU 044 Teaching Skills Laboratory 

Department Recommendation for Student Teaching 

Student Teaching (minimum grade of "C") 

NTE Core Battery III Professional Knowledge and Teaching Specialty 

Student Advisement Document (Part C) 

Application for Certification 
Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional 
education course. 

FRENCH/SPANISH MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Courses to be taken in appropriate language: French or Spanish. 

• Elementary and intermediate-level modern language courses: FRE/SPA 101, 102, 
201 , 202. 

• Other required courses: FRE/SPA 301 and 302. 

• Elective courses at 300 or 400 level: six hours. 

• Native speakers of the language in which they are minoring are exempt and exclud- 
ed from the elementary, intermediate and conversation courses in that language. 
They must take an additional course specified by the department in lieu of the con- 
versation courses. No credit is given for this exemption. 

Total: 24 semester hours. 

Certificate of Proficiency in Modern Language 

Students are awarded a "Certificate of Proficiency" upon completing six semester hours 
of 300- or 400-level courses in a single modern language with a grade of "B" or better. 
This certificate will be placed in the student's placement file upon request. Native 
speakers may not use conversation to complete the requirements. 

Placement in Modern Language Courses 

(1) All students with prior instruction in the target language who are interested in 
enrolling in foreign language classes or in demonstrating proficiency in the target lan- 
guage must take a standardized placement test from the appropriate language profes- 
sor during the registration period or at a time arranged with the professor. (2) Students 
who test out of French or Spanish 102 receive no credit unless they take French or 
Spanish 201 . Upon completion of French or Spanish 201 with a grade of "C" or better, 
the student who placed in 201 will receive 9 semester hours of credit (6 credit hours of 
advanced placement credit and 3 semester hours of credit for 201) AND will fulfill 
option 3 of the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective in the general college core 
requirement. (3) Students who test out of French or Spanish 202 will fulfill option 3 of 
the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective without taking further courses, BUT they 
must successfully complete a 300-level course in the same language in order to 
receive 6 hours of advanced placement credit. 

Courses of Instruction: ENGLISH 

ENG 012. SPEECH. 3. Introduction to the fundamentals of voice and diction, and pub- 
lic speaking. Note: Also listed as DRA 012. Fall, Spring. 



120 / English and Modern Languages 



ENG 020. CREATIVE WRITING. 3. A course in imaginative and expressive writing for 
the student who wishes to write short fiction and poetry. 

ENG 022. WRITING CENTER TUTORING. 1. A course designed to train students in 
effective tutoring techniques for Writing Center situations. Prerequisites: ENG 102 
or 103 or permission of instructor. Fall. 

ENG 100. FUNDAMENTALS OF WRITING. 3. A course designed to prepare the stu- 
dent for college level composition skills by focusing on sentence structure and para- 
graph writing. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in Writing 
Proficiency. To fulfill the Writing Proficiency requirement, the students who success- 
fully complete ENG 100 must continue into and successfully complete ENG 101 and 
102. Fall, Spring. 

ENG 101. COMPOSITION I. 3. A course that emphasizes writing and also focuses on 
usage, diction effective organization of essays, and development of reading skills. 
Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in Writing Proficiency. 
ENG 101 is a prerequisite for ENG 102. Both courses are ordinarily needed to satisfy 
the Writing Proficiency requirement. A student may be given exemption through 
departmental or approved standardized testing. Fall, Spring. 

ENG 102. COMPOSITION II. 3. A writing course that emphasizes logic, advanced 
reading skills, research skills, and the writing of argumentative essays. Note: Counts 
toward the general college core requirements in Writing Proficiency. Fall, Spring. 

ENG 103. FRESHMAN COMPOSITION - HONORS. 3. A course designed to give the 
exceptional student an opportunity to refine writing style and research skills through 
analyzing expository prose and some imaginative literature. Note: Admission to the 
course is only by invitation of the Department. Those who successfully complete the 
course will have satisfied the general college core requirements in Writing 
Proficiency. Students who decline the invitation to enter ENG 1 03 are placed in ENG 
102. Fall ' 

ENG 200. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE. 3. A study of the major literary genres 
(fiction, poetry, drama, and film), emphasizing the interpretation and appreciation of 
literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 103. Note: Counts toward the general college 
core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. Fall, Spring. 

ENG 204. WORLD AUTHORS I. 3. Selected readings of authors from the classical 
period to the Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 103. Note: Counts toward the 
general college core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. Fall, Spring. 

ENG 205. WORLD AUTHORS II. 3. Selected readings of authors from the seventeenth 
century to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 103. Note: Counts toward the gen- 
eral college core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. Fall, Spring. 

ENG 206. LITERATURE OF THE ORIENT. 3. A study of the imaginative and wisdom 
literature of the Far East, with emphasis on the literature of India, China, and Japan. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 103. Note: Counts toward the general college core 
requirements in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. Spring. 

ENG 207. FILM APPRECIATION. 3. A study of the cinema as an art form. Special 
emphasis is given to a study of the various techniques used in making movies and to 
the critical characteristics which should be evaluated when viewing a film. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 103. Note: Counts toward the general college core 
requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. Spring, Fall. 

ENG 208. WOMEN WRITERS. 3. A study of the work of selected women writers. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 103. Note: Counts toward the general college core 
requirements in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. Fall. 



English and Modern Languages / 121 



ENG 300. THE LITERATURE OF THE BIBLE IN ENGLISH. 3. A study of Biblical writ- 
ers, and the major characters, places, and events in the Bible and the apocryhpha 
which are needed for a reading of the Bible and an understanding of Biblical refer- 
ences and imagery elsewhere. Note: Also listed as REL 301. Fall 1993. 

ENG 301. SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I. 3. A survey of American litera- 
ture from Colonial times through the Romantic period. Fall 1994. 

ENG 302. SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II. 3. A survey of American litera- 
ture from Realism to the Contemporary period. Fall 1993. 

ENG 303. SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE I. 3. A survey of major British writers 
from the Old English period to the early eighteenth century. Offered in alternate 
years. Fall 1993. 

ENG 304. SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE II. 3. A survey of British writers from 
the late eighteenth century to the present. Offered in alternate years. Spring 1994. 

ENG 307. SHAKESPEARE: THE COMEDIES AND HISTORIES. 3. A reading of 
selected comedies and histories of Shakespeare. Fall 1993. 

ENG 308. SHAKESPEARE: THE TRAGEDIES. 3. A study of selected tragedies. 
Spring 1994. 

ENG 31 1 . ADVANCED GRAMMAR. 3. A descriptive, analytic approach to the study of 
English grammar. Traditional sentence diagrams, as well as structural sentence pat- 
terns and transformational branching diagrams, will be used to describe and explain 
the rules of English grammar to make them understandable and accessible to any- 
one interested in refining grammar skills. 

ENG 312. THE STRUCTURE OF THE LANGUAGE. 3. A study of English grammar 
which attempts to synthesize the most useful elements of the traditional and the lin- 
guistic descriptions of the language. 

ENG 315. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 3. A study of the major changes 
in the language as it has evolved, historically, into present-day English. Fall 1993. 

ENG 317. TECHNICAL WRITING. 3. An introduction to technical writing emphasizing 
planning, drafting, and revising technical documents such as instructions, reports 
and causal and process analyses. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 103. Spring 1994. 

ENG 318. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 3. A course designed to help students 
improve techniques in expository and persuasive writing. Prerequisite: At least one 
200-level English course. 

ENG 326. ADOLESCENT LITERATURE. 3. A study of the various genres of literature 
central to middle and secondary school education, emphasizing student response to 
literature, design of directed-reading study guides, censorship, and selection of 
appropriate materials for study and pleasure reading. Fall 1994. 

ENG 363. READING IN CONTENT AREAS: SECONDARY AND SPECIAL SUBJECT 
TEACHERS. 3. Materials and techniques to help teachers incorporate developmen- 
tal reading into content area classrooms, with some emphasis on remedial reading 
problems. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. Note: Also 
listed as EDU 363. Fall, Spring. 

ENG 400. SEMINAR IN BRITISH LITERATURE BEFORE 1800. 3. A study of one lit- 
erary period prior to the nineteenth century selected from one of the following: Anglo- 
Saxon, Chaucer and His Times, the Renaissance (excluding Shakespeare), or 
Eighteenth Century. Note: Course may be taken a maximum of three times if each is 
in a different period. 




122 / English and Modern Languages 



ENG 402. SEMINAR IN A MAJOR AUTHOR. 3. A study of the works of a single major 
author (British or American), such as Chaucer, Milton or Faulkner. Note: Course may 
be taken twice if a different writer is studied each time. 

ENG 403. SEMINAR IN THE ENGLISH NOVEL. 3. A study of the English novel in 
either the eighteenth or nineteenth century. Note: May be taken a second time if a 
different period is studied. Fall 1993. 

ENG 405. MODERN FICTION. 3. A study of major fiction of the twentieth century. 
Summer 1993. 

ENG 406. MODERN POETRY. 3. A study of major British and American poets from 
1900 to the present. 

ENG 459. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND STRATEGIES IN ENGLISH. 2. A continu- 
ation of EDU 458 emphasizing the teaching of English in the secondary school. 
Course includes theories of teaching writing and literature, course design, instruc- 
tional procedures and evaluation strategies specific to the English classroom. 
Prerequisites: Admission into the Teacher Education Program and successful com- 
pletion of EDU 458. Fall. 

ENG 481. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH. 1, 2, or 3. Directed individual research in 
English, and Special Study in areas not covered by catalog course listing. Fall, 
Spring. 

Courses of Instruction: FRENCH 

FRE 101. ELEMENTARY FRENCH I. 3. Introduction to the French language through 
grammar, reading, pronunciation, conversation, and civilization. Note: Counts toward 
the general college core requirements in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. 
Fall. 

FRE 102. ELEMENTARY FRENCH II. 3. Second-semester continuation of FRE 101. 
Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in the Global and Cross- 
Cultural Perspective. Spring. 

FRE 201. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I. 3. Emphasis on listening, speaking and writing 
skills. Introduction to French literature; study of French culture and civilization. Some 
grammar review. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in the 
Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. Laboratory required. Fall. 

FRE 202. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II. 3. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing. 
Some grammar review. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements 
in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. Laboratory required. Spring. 

FRE 301. FRENCH CONVERSATION. 3. Study and practice in speaking French. 
Prerequisite: FRE 202 or equivalent. Fall 1993. 

FRE 302. FRENCH COMPOSITION. 3. Study and practice of writing skills with empha- 
sis on vocabulary building and structure. Prerequisite: FRE 202 or equivalent. Fall 
(even years). 

FRE 303. LINGUISTICS: PHONOLOGY AND STRUCTURE. 3. Study of the phonetics 
and development of the French language. Prerequisite: FRE 202 or equivalent. Fall 
(even years). 

FRE 311. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE I. 3. Study of the masterpieces of 
French literature from the beginning through the seventeenth century. Prerequisite: 
FRE 202 or permission of instructor. Fall 1 996. 

FRE 312. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE II. 3. Study of the masterpieces of 
French literature from the eighteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: FRE 202 
or permission of instructor. Fall 1 994. 






English and Modern Languages / 123 



FRE 325. FRENCH CIVILIZATION. 3. The civilization and culture of France and the 
French people. Includes study of both past and present contributions of France to 
world cultures and an in-depth consideration of France today. Prerequisite: FRE 
202 or permission of instructor. Spring 1 995. 

FRE 401. SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE. 3. Study of the masterpieces of 
the classic movement. Prerequisite: FRE 31 1 or permission of instructor. Spring 
1995. 

FRE 411. NINETEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE I. 3. Study of the masterpieces of 
Romanticism. Prerequisite: FRE 312 or permission of instructor. Fall 1995. 

FRE 412. NINETEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE II. 3. Study of the masterpieces of 
Realism/Naturalism. Prerequisite: FRE 312 or permission of instructor. Fall 1993. 

FRE 421. ADVANCED FRENCH CONVERSATION AND READING. 3. Designed for 
the student who wishes to refine listening and speaking skills. Utilizes the close rela- 
tionship between reading and speaking French. Natural Way methodology, which 
emphasizes reading with some composition, also assures grammar acquisition and 
vocabulary enrichment. Prerequisite: FRE 301 , or permission of instructor. 

FRE 422. ADVANCED FRENCH GRAMMAR. 3. Studies in advanced structure. 
Prerequisite: FRE 302 or permission of instructor. Spring 1994. 

FRE 459. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND STRATEGIES. 2. A continuation of EDU 
458, the course is a study of second language instruction methodologies, materials, 
course design, and effective teaching strategies specific to the second language 
classroom. Prepares second language teacher candidate for K-12 certification. 
Prerequisites: Admission into the Teacher Education Program and successful com- 
pletion of EDU 458. Fall. 

FRE 481. SPECIAL STUDIES IN FRENCH. 1, 2, or 3. Directed individual research in 
French, and Special Study areas not covered by catalog courses listings. 

Courses of Instruction: SPANISH 

SPA 101. ELEMENTARY SPANISH I. 3. Introduction to Spanish grammar, reading, 
pronunciation, and civilizations of Spanish-speaking peoples; a four skills approach. 
Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in the Global and Cross- 
Cultural Perspective. Fall, Spring. 

iSPA 102. ELEMENTARY SPANISH II. 3. Second-semester continuation of SPA 101. 
Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in the Global and Cross- 
Cultural Perspective. Spring. 

SPA 201. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I. 3. Grammar review and expansion of reading, 
writing, listening, and speaking skills, as well as the study of the literatures, civiliza- 
tions, and history of the target cultures. Prerequisite: SPA 102 or equivalent. Note: 

i Counts toward the general college core requirements in the Global and Cross- 
Cultural Perspective. Fall, 

SPA 202. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II. 3. Some grammar and more expansion of the 
four language skills, with emphasis on reading proficiency via authentic materials. 
Reading, writing, and aural work of appropriate difficulty. Study of the culture and civ- 
ilization of the Spanish-speaking peoples. Prerequisite: SPA 201 or equivalent. 
Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in the Global and Cross- 
Cultural Perspective. Laboratory may be required. Spring. 

SPA 301. SPANISH CONVERSATION. 3. Study and practice in speaking Spanish. 
Prerequisite: SPA 202 or permission of instructor. Spring 1994. 

SPA 302. SPANISH COMPOSITION. 3. Study and practice of writing skills with 



124 / English and Modern Languages 



emphasis on lexical building, nuances of usage, and structure. Prerequisite: SPA 
202 or equivalent. Fall 1993. 

SPA 303. LINGUISTICS: PHONOLOGY AND PHONETICS. 3. Study of the phonetics, 
phonology, dialects, orthography, and development of the language. Prerequisite: 
SPA 202 or equivalent. Spring 1995. 

SPA 311. SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE I. 3. A survey course designed to 
familiarize the advanced-level student with representative works of the literature of 
Spain from its beginnings to the end of the Golden Age. Study of the culture and his- 
tory of Spain during this time. Prerequisite: SPA 202 or equivalent. Spring 1994. 

SPA 312. SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE II. 3. Study of representative works of 
Spain from the eighteenth century to the modern era. Study of the culture and history 
of the country during this time. Prerequisite: SPA 202 or equivalent. Fall 1994. 

SPA 325. SPANISH CIVILIZATION. 3. General course on Spain and its people. 
Prerequisite: SPA 202 or permission of instructor. Fall 1995. 

SPA 401. HISPANIC AMERICAN LITERATURE I. 3. A survey course designed to 
familiarize the advanced student of Spanish with notable Latin American literature 
from the Precolumbian period to Modernism. Political, economic, and social back- 
grounds of the period also studied. Prerequisite: SPA 202 or equivalent. Spring 
1995. 

SPA 402. HISPANIC AMERICAN LITERATURE II. 3. Study of representative literary 
works of Latin America from Modernism through the Boom. Brazilian literature will be 
incorporated for the student fluent in Portuguese. Emphasis on contemporary works. 
Cultural backgrounds of the period also studied. Prerequisite: SPA 202 or equiva- 
lent. Fall 1994. 

SPA 411. LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION. 3. A study of the cultures and civiliza- 
tions of Latin America. Prerequisite: SPA 202 or permission of instructor. Spring 
1994. 

SPA 421. ADVANCED SPANISH COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION. 3. Further 
study and practice in the more advanced points of grammar and oral expression. 
Prerequisites: SPA 301 and 302 or permission of the instructor. 

SPA 459. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND STRATEGIES. 2. A continuation of EDU 
458, the course is a study of second language instruction methodologies, materials, 
course design, and effective teaching strategies specific to the second language 
classroom. Prepares second language teacher candidate for K-12 certification. 
Prerequisites: Admission into the Teacher Education Program and successful com- 
pletion of EDU 458. Fall. 

SPA 481. SPECIAL STUDIES IN SPANISH. 1, 2, or 3. Directed individual research in 
Spanish, and Special Study in areas not covered by catalog course listings. 



History, Social Sciences, and Social Work / 125 



HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCES, AND SOCIAL WORK 

Professors: Head, MacLean, Nakhre 

Associate Professors: Ferencik, Holloway, Rentle, Shingleton 

Assistant Professors: Broadwater, Lane (Chair) 

Student Organizations: Hamlin Society, Pi Gamma Mu, Social Science Club. 

! Note: All courses listed in the requirements are 3-hour courses except where noted 
with a number in parentheses. Each set of double course numbers represents a lec- 
ture course/laboratory course combination. 

AMERICAN STUDIES MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• American Studies Core: ART/HIS 095; HIS 201 and *202; ENG 301 or 302; *MUS 
093; *POL 201 ; REL 314; and GEO 320. 

• Select two courses (not already used to fulfill the American Studies Core) from the 
following: ENG 301 , 302, 408; ECO 334; POL 202; REL 309. 

• Choose two courses from the following History courses: HIS 370, 420, 425, 430, 
435, 445. 

• American Studies course: AMS 470 (6). 

Total: 42 semester hours; *nine of these hours may be counted toward the general col- 
lege core requirements. 

i AMERICAN STUDIES MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• All of the requirements of the American Studies Major (B.S.) listed above. 

• Modern language: Two courses at the intermediate level (*201 and *202). 

Total: 48 semester hours: *15 of these hours may be counted toward the general edu- 
cation core requirements. 

AMERICAN STUDIES MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• All of the requirements of the American Studies Core in the American Studies Major 
(B.S.) listed above. 

Total: 24 semester hours. 

GEOGRAPHY MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Geography course: GEO 201 , 202. 

• Geography electives: 12 hours of which at least nine must be from the 300- or 400- 
level GEO courses. 

Total: 18 semester hours. 

HISTORY MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• History courses: HIS *1 01 (or *103), 102 (or 104), 201, *202. 

• History electives: 18 hours. 

• Modern language: Two courses at the intermediate level (*201 and *202). 

• Research Paper requirement: The paper must have a minimum length of fifteen 
pages. It must include footnotes (or endnotes), bibliography, and use of some prima- 
ry sources. Alternative formats such as oral histories, videotapes, and slide presenta- 
tions must be submitted to a committee of history professors for approval before the 
work is begun. The alternative formats must include primary source evidence and a 
written component (introduction-abstract, methodology, script and conclusion). This 
requirement may be met through HIS 415, 480, in a 300- or 400-level HIS course 
requiring a research paper (with instructor's approval). The student must arrange 
with the instructor at the beginning of the course considered for this purpose. The 
student must obtain at least a "C" grade on the paper without respect to the course 
grade. Upon completion of this requirement a statement of compliance will be added 
to the student's file. 

Total: 36 semester hours; *12 hours of these may be used toward the general college 
core requirements. 



126 / History, Social Sciences, and Social Work 



HISTORY MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• History courses: HIS 101 (or 103), 102 (or 104). 

• History electives: 12 hours. 
Total: 19 semester hours. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• International Studies Core: ANT 201, GEO 201, HIS 102 and *202, POL *201 and 
203, SOC *201 . 

Modern language: Two courses at the intermediate level (*201 and *202). 
Select one course: ART 091 , ENG 206 or 208, MUS 092, REL 110. 
Select one course: POL 301 or 302. 
Select one course: FRE 325, SPA 325 or 41 1 . 
International Studies Seminar: INT 401 . 

Elective courses: 15 hours from lists below. Select no more than two from any one 
discipline. 

Economics courses: ECO 231 , 332, 335, and BUS 481 . 
French courses: FRE 311,31 2, 481 . 
Geography courses: GEO 310, 330, 340, 350. 
History courses: HIS 330, 335, 340, 345, 410, 415, 480. 

Political Science courses: POL 320, 340, 401 , 402, 450, 480. Either POL 301 or 302 
may be added to this list if not taken to satisfy an above requirement. 
Sociology course: SOC 350. 

Spanish courses: SPA 31 1 , 312, 401 , 402, 481 . Either SPA or 41 1 may be added to 
this list if not taken to satisfy an above requirement. 
Total: 54 semester hours; *15 hours of these may be used toward the general college 
core requirements. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Political Science courses: POL *201 , 301 , 302, 401 , 402, 450. 

• Political Science electives: 1 2 hours. Of these, up to six hours of 300- or 400-level 
courses in other appropriate disciplines may be used after consultation with the stu- 
dent's advisor. 

• Modern language: Two courses at the intermediate level (*201 and *202). 

Total: 36 semester hours; *nine hours of these may be counted toward the general col- 
lege core requirements. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Political Science courses: POL *201 , 301 , 302, 401 , 402, 450. 

• Statistics course: MAT *223. 

• Select one of the following Philosophy courses: PHI *201 , *21 1 , or 212. 

• Political Science electives: 12 hours. Of these, up to six hours of 300- or 400-level 
courses in other appropriate disciplines may be used after consultation with the stu- 
dent's advisor. 

Total: 36 semester hours; *nine of these may be counted toward the general college 
core requirements. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Political Science courses: POL 201 , 301 . 

• Political Science electives: 12 hours including at least six hours from 300- or 400- 
level courses. 

Total: 1 8 semester hours. 

SOCIAL STUDIES MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• History courses: HIS *1 01 (or *1 03) 1 02 (or 1 04), and 201 , *202. 

• Other courses in the social studies: *ECO 231 ; GEO 201 ; *POL 201 ; SOC 201 ; SST 
301. 

• Select one course from the following: POL 202, 203, 301 , 302; GEO 310, 330, 340. 



History, Social Sciences, and Social Work/ 127 



• Social Studies electives: 15 hours at the 300- or 400-level selected from courses in 
Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology. 
These may include additional courses from the option listed above, including POL 
202 and 203. 

• Modern Language: Two courses at the intermediate level (*201 and *202). 

Total: 49 semester hours; *18 of these may be counted toward the general college core 
requirements. 

SOCIAL STUDIES MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• History courses: HIS 1 01 (or *1 03), *1 02 (or *1 04), and 201 , *202. 

• Other courses in the social studies: *ECO 231 ; GEO *201 ; *POL 201 ; SOC 201 ; SST 
301. 

• Select two courses from the following: POL 201 , *203, 301 , 302; GEO 310, 330, 340. 

• Computer Expectations: CIS 050. 

• Social Studies electives: 15 hours at the 300- or 400-level selected from courses in 
Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology. 
These may include additional courses among the option listed above, including POL 
231 and 232. 

Total: 49 semester hours; *21 of these may be counted toward the general college core 
requirements. 

SOCIAL STUDIES MAJOR (B.A. or B.S.)/TEACHER CERTIFICATION REQUIRE- 
MENTS: 

• Complete the major requirements listed above for either of the Social Studies (B.A. 
or B.S.) majors. 

Total: 49 semester hours: *18 (if B.A.) or *21 (if B.S.) of these may be counted toward 
the general college core requirements. In addition, the student must complete the fol- 
lowing requirements for Teacher Certification: 

• Courses in the general college core requirements prescribed for Secondary Teacher 
certification: BIO 101/103 (3/1); SCI 101 (2) and 102 (2); PSY 223. 

• Professional education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Semester: EDU 201 and 458 (2); ENG 363; PSY 323 and 

483; SST 459 (2). 

During the Professional Semester (Spring): EDU 443 (2), 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 (6). 

• Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0), 033 (0), 044 (4). 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional education 
course. Only the student who successfully completes all phases of the Entrance 
Criteria Program and meets all other department requirements can be permitted to 
enter pre-service teaching. 

Entrance Criteria Program 

The Entrance Criteria Program (ECP) is designed to screen candidates for 
teacher certification. This program requires data to demonstrate that the can- 
didate possesses the necessary competencies to be an effective teacher. 
There are specific time constraints on some of the requirements. The student 
is responsible for complying with all ECP guidelines. The student must suc- 
cessfully complete: 

Phase I: To be completed by the end of the Second Year. 

SAT Scores on file 

Strong Interest Inventory 

Declaration of Major 

EDU 01 1 Practicum and EDU 022 Practicum 

NTE Core Battery I and Core Battery II 

Probability of Success Form 



128 / History, Social Sciences, and Social Work 



Program Projection 

Student Advisement Document (Part A) 

Interview for Candidacy 

2.50 GPA on all courses attempted 

Application to Teacher Education: Admission to candidacy for certification is 

contingent on successful completion of Phase I requirements. Upon 

admission to candidacy, a student may then register for upper-level (300- 

400) education courses. 
Phase II: To be completed by the end of the Junior Year. 
EDU 033 Practicum 
2.50 GPA on all course work attempted, all courses in the major, and on all 

professional education courses 
Application for Student Teaching 
Student Advisement Document (Part B) 
Phase III: To be completed by the end of the Senior Year. 
EDU 044 Teaching Skills Laboratory 
Departmental Recommendation for Student Teaching 
Student Teaching (minimum grade of "C") 

NTE Core Battery III Professional Knowledge and Teaching Specialty. 
Student Advisement Document: (Part C) 
Application for Certification 

SOCIAL WORK MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Liberal arts courses: *SOC 201 , *POL 201 , PSY 1 1 0, °BIO 21 9 (4). 

• Social Work courses: SWK 201, 210, 220, 310, 320, 330, 430, 440, 450 (10), 451 
(2). 

• Social Work elective: one SWK course. 

• Successful completion of admission requirements for the major. 

Total: 52 semester hours: *six of these may be counted toward the general college 
core requirements in The Social Sciences. °BIO 219 has a prerequisite (BIO 101/103) 
which is included in the core curriculum. The primary educational objective of the major 
is the preparation of a student for beginning-level social work practice. Within the 
framework of a liberal arts education social work courses embrace the generalist model 
with a continuous emphasis on the importance of evaluating social work intervention. 

The Social Work Program at Barton was granted candidacy status by the Council on 
Social Work Education effective October, 1992. 

Admission to Social Work Major 

Any student desiring entrance to the Social Work Program must make formal applica- 
tion to the program. Applications should be submitted to the Director of the Social Work 
Program during the semester in which the student is enrolled in SWK 201 . Criteria for 
admission include: 

• Minimum of a 2.00 grade point average - overall. 

• Two letters of recommendation from the college faculty testifying about academic 
ability and motivation. 

• Completion of a 200-level SWK course with at least a "C" grade. 

• Submission of a writing sample (if a transfer student who has not taken an English 
course at Barton). 

• Interview with the student. Under certain circumstances this may be required. 

There will be an admissions committee consisting of the Social Work Program faculty. 
At least 2 out of 3 members will meet at the (beginning/end) of each semester to review 
the qualifications of students applying to the Social Work Program. Decisions for 
admission or rejection of students will generally be based upon consensus among the 
committee members. However, where there is disagreement the decision will be made 



History, Social Sciences, and Social Work / 129 



upon majority vote. In cases where there is disagreement the student evaluation will be 
reconsidered upon the completion of one semester of SWK course work. 

Appeals: Applicants not accepted into the Social Work Program have a right to appeal 
the decision. The appeal must be made in writing within five working days of the deci- 
sion and be submitted to the Chair of the Department of History, Social Sciences, and 
Social Work. The Chair will name two other persons to form a committee to hear this 
appeal. The committee's response to the appeal will be given within seven days of the 
hearing. At such time as an Advisory Board to the Social Work Program is in place, that 
Board will assume the responsibility for hearing the acting upon appeals. 

Eligibility for Continued Enrollment in the Social Work Program. 

Evaluation of the student is an ongoing process. At least yearly the Social work 
Admissions Committee will review the progress of the student in the program and will 
make recommendations. To remain in the program the student must achieve at least a 
2.00 overall GPA with a minimum grade of "C" in all SWK courses. The student must 
have a 2.00 GPA before enrolling in SWK 450 and 451 . 

If at any time there is substantive evidence that a social work student is lacking in basic 
motivation or in those personal or academic qualities which are essential to be a social 
worker the committee will meet to determine whether the student should leave the pro- 
gram. The dismissal of the student will consist of: 

• a written, factual summary of those deficiencies to be evaluated by the entire 
Social Work Admissions Committee. 

• a meeting between the committee and the student to discuss those deficiencies 
and to allow the student to respond to them. 

• assistance and direction to find a more suitable academic major at Barton College 
(if the student is counseled out of the program). 

SOCIOLOGY MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Sociology courses: SOC *201 and 401 , 410. 

• Anthropology course: ANT 201 . 

• Modern Language: Two courses at the intermediate level (*201 and *202). 

• Sociology electives: 18 hours. Of these, up to six hours of 300- 400-level courses in 
other appropriate disciplines may be used after consultation with the student's advi- 
sor. 

Total: 36 semester hours; *nine of these may be counted toward the general college 
core requirements. 

SOCIOLOGY MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Sociology courses: SOC 201 and 401 . 

• Sociology electives: 12 hours including at least six hours from 300- or 400-level 
courses. 

Total: 18 semester hours. 

Courses of Instruction: AMERICAN STUDIES 

AMS 470. AMERICAN STUDIES PRACTICUM. 3. Course follows one of two different 
approaches depending upon the student's interest and advisement: A) Practicum or 
internship with a gallery, historic site, museum, house museum, research facility, or 
other appropriate organization coupled with a seminar aimed at coordination of the 
various learning experiences. B) Scholarly research project in an area of American 
Studies selected in consultation with the advisor. Prerequisite: Senior level, or per- 
mission from the instructor. Advance registration required. Special fee charged. 



130 / History, Social Sciences, and Social Work 



Courses of Instruction: ANTHROPOLOGY 

ANT 201. INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 3. A survey of the 
dynamics of cultural processes within selected human societies. Emphasis upon the 
study of preliterate groups. Note: Counts toward the general college core require- 
ments in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. Fall, Spring. 

Courses of Instruction: GEOGRAPHY 

GEO 201. WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY. 3. A survey of the worlds cultural 
regions. Emphasis on geographic distribution of human phenomena and their effects 
on current problems. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in 
the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. Fall, Spring. 

GEO 202. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. 3. A survey of the distribution and interrelation- 
ships of the natural phenomena on the earth's surface. Emphasis on the use of 
maps. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in The Social 
Sciences. Spring. 

GEO 310. GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE AND THE U.S.S.R. 3. A study of the distribu- 
tion and interrelationship of landforms, climates, people and cultural features of 
Europe and the regions of the former Soviet Union. Spring, even years. 

GEO 320. GEOGRAPHY OF ANGLO AMERICA. 3. A study of the geographic distribu- 
tion of natural and cultural phenomena in the United States and Canada. Use of 
topographic maps. Fall, even years. 

GEO 330. GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA. 3. A study of the geographic distribu- 
tion of natural and cultural phenomena in the countries to the south of the United 
States. Spring, odd years. 

GEO 340. POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY. 3. A study of the imprint and distribution of polit- 
ical institutions on the earth's surface. Topics include electoral geography of the 
United States. Note: Also listed as POL 340. Fall, odd years. 

GEO 350. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY AND WORLD TRADE. 3. A study of the distribu- 
tion of economic activities on the earth's surface. Topics include: demography, 
sources of raw materials, locations of manufacturing, transportation, urban areas. 
Note: Also listed as ECO 332. Fall, odd years. 

GEO 480. INDIVIDUAL GEOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH. 3. Selected research projects 
on a geographic topic. Prerequisites: Senior-level students only. Student must peti- 
tion the Department at least two weeks before advanced registration. Note: Course 
is also offered as GEO 481 for 1 semester hour, and as GEO 482 for 2 semester 
hours. 

Courses of Instruction: HISTORY 

HIS 095. AMERICAN MATERIAL CULTURE. 3. An interdisciplinary approach to the 
study of the physical object as fact from the beginning of the European influence in 
North American until the Industrial Revolution. Historical site study in the region is 
required. Note: Field trip fee required. Also listed as ART 095. 

HIS 101. HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION TO 1789. 3. A historical survey of world civiliza- 
tions from prehistoric beginnings to 1789. Note: Fulfills one of the general college 
core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. Fall, Spring. 

HIS 102. HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION SINCE 1789. 3. A historical survey of world civi- 
lizations from 1789 to the present. Note: Counts toward the general college core 
requirements in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. Fall, Spring. 



History, Social Sciences, and Social Work/ 131 



HIS 103. HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION TO 1789 - HONORS. 3. An accelerated 
approach to the study of the history of civilization aimed at challenging students who 
already possess some knowledge of the broad contours and important events of 
world history. While some emphasis is placed on the traditional, chronological 
approach to learning history, additional focus is placed upon prehistory, the writing of 
history, and the interdisciplinary aspects of history. Prerequisite: Admittance is limit- 
ed to student receiving an invitation or successfully petitioning the Department. 
Note: Fulfills one of the general college core requirements in The Humanities and 
Fine Arts. Fall. 

HIS 104. HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION SINCE 1789 - HONORS. 3. An accelerated 
approach to the study of the history of civilization. While some emphasis is placed 
upon the traditional, chronological approach to learning history, additional focus is 
placed upon the writing of history and the interdisciplinary aspects of history. 
Prerequisite: Admittance is limited to students receiving an invitation or successfully 
petitioning the Department. Note: Counts toward the general college core require- 
ments in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. 

HIS 201. UNITED STATES TO 1877. 3. A survey of the history of the United States 
from the Colonial period to the close of Reconstruction. Fall, Spring. 

I HIS 202. UNITED STATES SINCE 1877. 3. A survey of the history of the United States 
from Reconstruction to the present. Note: Counts toward the general college core 
requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. Fall, Spring 

HIS 314. RELIGION IN AMERICA 3. A study of the development of religion within 
American culture. Note: Also listed as REL 314. Fall. 

HIS 316. THE MIDDLE AGES. 3. A survey of the political, social, intellectual, econom- 
ic, and religious aspects of Western European history from 300 to 1500. Note: Also 
listed as REL 31 6. Fall. 

HIS 319. EUROPE AND THE REFORMATION. 3. A study of the religious and secular 
backgrounds of the Protestant Reformation, its history and effects. Note: Also listed 
as REL 319. Fall. 

i HIS 325. WORLD WAR II, 1935-1945. 3. The leaders, issues, and battles of the most 
expensive and destructive war ever waged placed into historical perspective. Fall 
1992. 

I HIS 330. ASIA. 3. A survey of the role of Eastern Civilization in world history. 
Prerequisite: HIS 101. 

I HIS 335. RUSSIA. 3. Topics in the history of Russia with emphasis upon the factors 
producing the Bolshevik Revolution and the development of Russia since the 
Revolution. Prerequisite: HIS 101. 

HIS 340. AFRICA. 3. A survey of the history of Africa, with emphasis upon the modern 
period. Prerequisite: HIS 101. 

HIS 345. LATIN AMERICA. 3. Topics in the history of Central and South America. 
Prerequisite: HIS 1 01 . Fall 1 992. 

HIS 350. HISTORY OF COMMUNICATIONS. 3. A study of the various means of trans- 
mitting information as it evolved from prehistory to the present, with particular refer- 
ence to the consequences of technological innovation. 

HIS 370. THE SOUTH. 3. Topics in the history of the southern section of the United 
States. 

HIS 375. NORTH CAROLINA. 3. The history of the Tar Heel state from the Lost 
Colony to the present. Spring. 



1 32 / History, Social Sciences, and Social Work 



HIS 410. MAKING OF MODERN EUROPE, 1815-1945. 3. An examination of the 
development and expansion of modern Europe from the end of the Napoleonic wars 
until the end of World War II. Course covers the period of European greatness and 
world dominance; of the development of the ideas of liberalism, nationalism, and 
socialism; of complex diplomatic, economic and social changes which transformed 
the world and led to two world wars. Prerequisite: HIS 101. 

HIS 415. CONTEMPORARY WORLD CRISES. 3. A combined lecture (1/2) and semi- 
nar (1/2) course which features an examination of the history of the world since 1945 
including, but not limited to political, economic and international developments. 
Includes a major research paper on an ongoing crisis of choice (with professor's 
approval). Course meets the requirement of a research paper for the history major. 
Prerequisite: HIS 101. 

HIS 430. THE EARLY REPUBLIC: U.S. HISTORY, 1783-1845. 3. An advanced survey 
of the Confederation, Constitution, and Federalist periods, continuing through the 
Jeffersonian and Jacksonian eras. 

HIS 435. THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION. 3. U.S. history from 1845 to 
1877, with special attention to sectionalism, political issues, Constitutional interpreta- 
tion, military and naval campaigns, post-war social and economic changes. 
Prerequisite: HIS 101. 

HIS 440. MODERN AMERICA. 3. An advanced survey of the major trends in American 
politics, foreign policy, and society from the Second World War to the present. 
Prerequisites: HIS 1 01 . Fall 1 993. 

HIS 445. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. 3. Topics in the history 
of American foreign relations. Prerequisite: HIS 101 . Note: Also listed as POL 445. 

HIS 480. INDIVIDUAL HISTORICAL RESEARCH. 3. Selected research projects in a 
historical area. Prerequisites: Senior-level students only. Student must petition the 
Department at least two weeks before advanced registration. Note: Course is also 
offered as HIS 481 for 1 semester hour, and as HIS 482 for 2 semester hours. 

Courses of Instruction: INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

INT 401. 3. An in-depth study of the history, politics and culture of one country featuring 
outside speakers and presentations by professors from several fields of expertise. 
The course is primarily, but not exclusively, designed for students majoring in 
International Studies to apply the ideas and concepts of the varied disciplines by 
studying the manageable unit of one country. Prerequisites: Senior-level standing 
within the International Studies Major. Permission of the International Studies 
Interdisciplinary Team is required for the student not majoring in International 
Studies. 

Courses of Instruction: POLITICAL SCIENCE 

POL 201. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS. 3. An analysis of the struc- 
ture and operation of the American political system. Examines American politics, 
government, and policy making, using concepts that reflect the pervasive interplay of 
policies, economics, and institutions. Note: Counts toward the general college core 
requirements in The Social Sciences. Fall, Spring. 

POL 202. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT. 3. A survey of the structures, institu- 
tions, and functions of state and local governments generally, with particular refer- 
ence to the government of North Carolina. Note: Counts toward the general college 
core requirements in The Social Sciences. Spring. 



History, Social Sciences, and Social Work/ 133 



POL 203. INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. 3. An analysis of the 
institutional forms and processes responsible for the character of international rela- 
tions in the modern world. Note: Counts toward the general college core require- 
ments in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. Fall. 

POL 301. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT OF WESTERN NATIONS. 3. A study of 
the governments of several selected Western states. Prerequisite: POL 201 . 

POL 302. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT OF NON-WESTERN NATIONS. 3. A study 
of the governments of several selected non-Western states. Prerequisite: POL 201 . 

POL 320. POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY. 3. A study of the cultural factors which are basic 
to political behavior. Prerequisites: POL 201 and SOC 201. Note: Also listed as 
SOC 320. 

POL 340. POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY. 3. A study of the imprint and distribution of politi- 
cal institutions on the earth's surface. Topics include electoral geography of the 
United States. Note: Also listed as GEO 340. Fall (odd years). 

POL 350. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION IN AMERICAN SOCIETY. 3. Overview of the 
principles and practices of public administration in the United States. Emphasis is 
upon the role of public administration as it relates to the formulation and implementa- 
tion of public policies. Note: Also listed as SWK 350. 

POL 401. WESTERN POLITICAL THEORY: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL. 3. A review 
of the main currents of Western political theory from Plato to Locke. Note: Also listed 
as PHI 401. 

POL 402. WESTERN POLITICAL THEORY: MODERN. 3. A review of the main cur 
rents of Western political theory from Montesquieu to the present. Note: Also listed 
as PHI 402. 

POL 445. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. 3. Topics in the history 
of American foreign relations. Prerequisite: HIS 101 . Note: Also listed as HIS 445. 

POL 450. POLITICAL SCIENCE SEMINAR. 3. A study of the scope and methods of 
political science. Spring. 

POL 480. INDIVIDUAL POLITICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH. 3. Selected research pro- 
jects in a political science area. Prerequisites: Senior-level students only. Student 
must petition the Department at least two weeks before advanced registration. Note: 
Course is also offered as POL 481 for 1 semester hour, and as POL 482 for 2 
semester hours. 

Courses of Instruction: SOCIAL STUDIES 

SST 301. SOCIAL STUDIES SEMINAR. 1. A brief survey of the social studies 
designed to 1 ) diagnose areas of weakness in preparation for secondary teaching of 
the social studies, 2) prepare for teaching social studies with an interdisciplinary 
approach, and 3) investigate the role of the social sciences and history in today's 
society. Prerequisites: HIS 101, 102, 201, 202, ECO 231, GEO 201, POL 201, SOC 
201. 

SST 459. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND STRATEGIES IN THE SOCIAL STUDIES. 

2. A continuation of EDU 458 with emphasis on the methods and materials used and 
problems encountered in teaching the Social Studies. Prerequisites: EDU 458, and 
admission to the Teacher Education Program. Fall. 

Courses of Instruction: SOCIAL WORK 

SWK 201. INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL WORK PROFESSION. 3. An introduc- 



134 /History, Social Sciences, and Social Work 



tion to the development of the profession, basic knowledge and values of the profes- 
sion, and the practice of social work in a changing society. Analysis of a social ser- 
vice agency required. 

SWK 210. SOCIAL WORK POLICY I. 3. A study of the early major programs and their 
developments in the American social welfare system. An analysis of major issues 
and policies involved in these programs is included. Agency study required. 
Prerequisites: POL 230, SWK 201 . 

SWK 220. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I. 3. Prepares the stu- 
dent to assess human functioning based on the systems model. Emphasis on social, 
biological, psychological, and cultural influences in the early phases of the life span. 
Prerequisites: SOC 222, PSY 110. 

SWK 310. SOCIAL WORK POLICY II. 3. A study of contemporary social problems and 
the social welfare programs designed to ameliorate these problems. Legal issues 
and cases that relate to Social Work practice are discussed. Prerequisites: SWK 
210,220. Fall. 

SWK 320. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II. 3. Covers human 
behavior from adolescence through older adulthood. Emphasis placed on the interre- 
latedness of individual, family, cultural and social factors which affect human func- 
tioning. Prerequisites: SWK 210 and 220. Fall. 

SWK 322. SUBSTANCE ABUSE. 3. A survey of drug and alcohol abuse in American 
society. The course examines how and why individuals become addicted to various 
substances and how they recover. 

SWK 330. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I. 3. A generalist approach to the practice of 
social work. Professional values, relationships, communication and interviewing skills 
as they pertain to individuals and families are emphasized. Examination of different 
ethnic and cultural characteristics. Simulated interviews and self-evaluation are sig- 
nificant components of course. Participation in volunteer work is required. 
Prerequisite: SWK 31 0, 320. 

SWK 350. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION IN AMERICAN SOCIETY. 3. Overview of the 
principles and practices of public administration in the United States. Emphasis is 
upon the role of public administration as it relates to the formulation and implementa- 
tion of public policies. Note: also listed as POL 350. 

SWK 430. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE II. 3. Applies generalist practice skills within the 
systems framework to small and large groups, communities and organizations. 
Attention is given to issues of racism, sexism, ageism, and the needs of various cul- 
tural groups. Self-evaluation is a significant component of course. Prerequisite: 
SWK 330. 

SWK 440. SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH. 3. Examination of concepts and procedures 
pertaining to social scientific inquiry with emphasis on research design and evaluat- 
ing one's own practice. Computer applications included. Prerequisite: SWK 320. 

SWK 450. SOCIAL WORK FIELD INSTRUCTION. 10. Placement in selected social 
service agency with a minimum of 480 hours required. Focus is on the integration of 
theory with practice, beginning-level professional responsibilities and the evaluation 
of interventions. Prerequisite: SWK 440. 

SWK 451. SOCIAL WORK INSTRUCTION SEMINAR. 2. Weekly seminars in which 
the students demonstrate ability to integrate theory with practice by completing writ- 
ten assignments and special projects. Prerequisite: SWK 440. Corequisite: SWK 
450. 



History, Social Sciences, and Social Work / 135 



Courses of Instruction: SOCIOLOGY 

SOC 070. HUMAN SEXUALITY. 3. Focus on the spiritual, psychological, physiological, 
social, cultural, and ethical aspects of sexuality throughout the life cycle. Note: Also 
listed as NUR 070. Fall, Spring. 

SOC 201. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY. 3. A survey of the fundamental characteris- 
tics of social relationships, including such areas as culture, personality, population, 
social institutions and social change. Note: Counts toward the general college core 
requirements in The Social Sciences. Fall, Spring. 

SOC 223. STATISTICAL CONCEPTS. 3. An introduction to probability and statistics. 
Emphasis placed on general descriptive statistics, fundamental concepts and proce- 
dures of statistical inference. Prerequisite: MAT 102, or equivalent. Note: Also listed 
as MAT 223. The sociology listing will continue to be used for this course through the 
1992-1993 academic year. 

SOC 309. BLACK RELIGION IN AMERICA. 3. An exploration of the development of 
African-American religion, considering the historical roots, social and cultural dimen- 
sions, impact on American religious life and culture, and contemporary trends. Note: 
Also listed as REL 309. Spring. 

SOC 310. MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY. 3. A study and analysis of the social char- 
acteristics of our marriage and family customs, principally oriented toward acquaint- 
ing the student with the behavioral aspects of modern family living. Prerequisite: 
Junior or senior standing. Fall, Spring. 

SOC 320. POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY. 3. A study of the social and cultural factors which 
are basic to political behavior. Prerequisites: POL 201 and SOC 201 . Note: Also 
listed as POL 320. 

SOC 330. CRIMINOLOGY. 3. A systematic study of penology, the culture of crime, 
institutions of social control as well as related problems in criminology. Prerequisite: 
SOC 201 . 

SOC 340. MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY. 3. A comparative and analytical approach to the 
study of health and medical institutions. Cultural and social changes also stressed. 
Prerequisite: SOC 201 . 

SOC 350. THE HOLOCAUST. 3. Course concerned with the destruction of European 
Jews during World War II, emphasizing the origins, processes, and the historical, 
sociological, and theological consequences. Attention given to other historical forms 
of genocide. 

SOC 401. SOCIAL THEORY AND METHODOLOGY. 3. A review and analysis of the 
historical context and current developments in the theory and methodology of sociol- 
ogy. Prerequisite: SOC 201 . 

SOC 410. MAJOR SOCIAL PROBLEMS. 3. A description of the major social problems 
in the contemporary world. Prerequisite: SOC 201 . 

SOC 424. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 3. A study of the individual's 
interaction with others and with the institutions of society. Prerequisites: PSY 110, 
1 12, or 223, or SOC 222. Note: Also listed as PSY 453. Spring. 

SOC 480. INDIVIDUAL SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH. 3. Selected research projects 
in a sociological area. Prerequisites: Senior-level students only. Student must peti- 
tion the Department at least two weeks before advanced registration. Note: Course 
is also offered as SOC 481 for 1 semester hour, and as SOC 482 for 2 semester 
hours. 



1 36 / Mathematics 



MATHEMATICS 

Professor: Frazier (Chair) 

Assistant Professors: Cai, Petway, Ranganathan, Welch ^___ 

Student Organization: Math Club. 

Note: All courses listed in the requirements are 3-hour courses except where noted 
with a number in parentheses. Each set of double course numbers represents a lec- 
ture course/laboratory course combination. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Required Computer Science courses: CSC 201 , 221 , 256. 

• Choose three courses from the following Computer Science courses: CSC 215, 216, 
218, 288, 315, 322, 345, 385. One course from this requirement must be at the 300- 
level. 

Total: 18 semester hours. 

MATHEMATICS MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Mathematics courses: MAT *109, 209, 221 , 303, 304, 305, 365. 

• Mathematics electives: nine hours from courses numbered 210 or above. 

• Computer expectations: CSC 050, or equivalent. Additional computer skills are listed 
in some course syllabi; e.g. experience in using user-friendly software for graphing, 
matrix operations, numerical integration, and equation solving. 

• Modern language: six hours at the intermediate level (*201 and *202). 

Total: 39 semester hours; *nine hours of these may be counted toward the general col- 
lege core requirements. 

MATHEMATICS MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Mathematics courses: MAT *1 09, 209, 221 , 301 , 303, 304, 305, 365. 

• Mathematics electives: 1 2 hours from courses numbered 21 or above. 

• Physical science courses: choose either CHE *1 51/1 53 (3/1) and *1 52/1 54 (3/1), or 
PHY *1 30/1 31 (3/1) and *1 32/1 33 (3/1). 

• Computer expectations: CSC 050, or equivalent. Additional computer skills are listed 
in some course syllabi; e.g. experience in using user-friendly software for graphing, 
matrix operations, numerical integration, and equation solving. 

Total: 47 semester hours; *11 of these fulfill the general college core requirement in 
The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 

MATHEMATICS MAJOR (B.A. OR B.S.)/TEACHER CERTIFICATION REQUIRE- 
MENTS: 

• Complete the major requirements listed above for either of the Mathematics (B.A. or 
B.S.) majors. 

Total: 36 semester hours (B.A.) or 44 semester hours (B.S.); *nine (B.A.) or eleven 
(B.S.) may be counted toward the general college core requirements. In addition, the 
student must complete the following requirements for Teacher Certification: 

• Courses in the general college core requirements prescribed for Secondary Teacher 
certification: BIO 101/103 (3/1); HIS 202; POL 201; PSY 223; SCI 102 (2). Course in 
the general college core requirements prescribed for the B.A. degree only: SCI 101 
(2). 

• Professional Education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Semester: EDU 201 and 458 (2); ENG 363 (2); MAT 459 

(2); PSY 323 and 483. 

During the Professional Semester (Spring): EDU 443 (2), 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 (6). 

• Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0), 033 (0), 044 (0). 

• Complete all Entrance Criteria requirements. 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional education 



Mathematics/ 137 



course. Only the student who successfully completes all phases of the Entrance 
Criteria Program and meets all other department requirements can be permitted to 
enter pre-service teaching. 

Entrance Criteria Program 

The Entrance Criteria Program (ECP) is designed to screen candidates for 
teacher certification. This program requires data to demonstrate that the can- 
didate possesses the necessary competencies to be an effective teacher. 
There are specific time constraints on some of the requirements. The student 
is responsible for complying with all ECP guidelines. The student must suc- 
cessfully complete: 

Phase I: To be completed by the end of the Sophomore Year. 

SAT Scores on file 

Strong Interest Inventory 

Declaration of Major 

EDU 01 1 Practicum and EDU 022 Practicum 

NTE Core Battery I and Core Battery II 

Probability of Success Form 

Program Projection 

Student Advisement Document (Part A) 

Application to Mathematics Education Program (written) 

Interview for Candidacy 

2.50 GPA on all courses attempted 

Application to Teacher Education: Admission to candidacy for certification is 

contingent on successful completion of Phase I requirements. Upon 

Admission to candidacy, a student may then register for upper-level (300- 

400) education courses. 
Phase II: To be completed by the end of the Junior Year. 
EDU 033 Practicum 
2.50 GPA on all course work attempted, all courses in the major, and on all 

professional education courses 
Application for Student teaching 
Student Advisement Document (Part B) 
Phase III: To be completed by the end of the Senior Year. 
EDU 044 Teaching Skills Laboratory 
Departmental Recommendation for Student Teaching 
Student Teaching (minimum grade of "C") 

NTE Core Battery III Professional Knowledge and Teaching Specialty 
Student Advisement Document (Part C) 
Application for Certification 

Secondary (9-12) Mathematics Endorsement 

An endorsement in mathematics for Grades 9 through 1 2 allows a teacher to 
teach up to fifty percent of the work schedule in mathematics without penalty. 
The teacher must have (or acquire) certification in another discipline for 
Grades 9 through 12 and satisfy the following minimum requirements: 
• MAT °1 06, 109, 209, 221, 305; CSC 050 (or 201). 

Total: 18 semester hours. A minimum of two of the mathematics courses for 
the endorsement must be completed at Barton College with at least one of the 
courses numbered 300 or above. °This course may be waived by suitable 
mathematics placement on the College mathematics placement program. 

MATHEMATICS MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Required Mathematics course: MAT 209. 

• Choose three courses from the following: MAT 1 02, 1 06, 1 09, 231 . 

• Choose two courses from the following: MAT 221 , 301 , 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 309, 



1 38 / Mathematics 



365, 402, 406, 407. 
Total: 18 semester hours. 

Courses of Instruction: COMPUTER SCIENCE 

CSC 050. COMPUTER CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS. 3. Provides the opportuni- 
ty to use the computer as a problem-solving tool to enrich one's personal and profes- 
sional life. Laboratory exercises furnish hands-on experience with general-purpose 
software applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, graphics, and data- 
base. Lectures focus on computer functions, hardware and software issues, and the 
role of computers in society. Note: Also listed as CIS 050. Fall, Spring. 

CSC 201. STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING I. 3. An introduction to structured pro- 
gramming techniques, which emphasizes the development of problem solving skills, 
structured programming, good documentation and coding skills. Course is taught 
with PASCAL and the student is exposed to data representations, conditional state- 
ment, iterative constructions, arrays, records, recursion, simple sorting and searching 
methods. Prerequisite: MAT 100-101 or 102. Fall. 

CSC 215. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING IN RPG II, PART I. 3. An introductory course 
designed to help the student create problems utilizing Report Program Generator 
Language. The student works with code specification sheets, producing a spacing 
chart of any output report and/or summary records to be generated, selecting the 
coding approach that results in the fewest generated program instructions, creating 
the control cards required for the assembling and running of RPG Program. 
Prerequisite: CSC 050 or consent of instructor. Note: Also listed as CIS 215. Two 
lecture and two laboratory hours per week. 

CSC 216. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING IN RPG II, PART II. 3. A continuation of CSC 
21 5 with special attention given to more advanced business and mathematical prob- 
lems. The student works with zero suppression, decimal alignment and editing the 
field. Student is assigned laboratory problems and one project. Prerequisite: CSC 
215 or permission of instructor. Note: Two lecture and two laboratory hours per 
week. 

CSC 218. COBOL PROGRAMMING I. 3. Understanding the programming language 
COBOL and its applications to business. Emphasis placed on COBOL DIVISIONS, 
file manipulation, diagnostics, and debugging-programming assignments. 
Prerequisite: CSC 201 or permission of instructor. Note: Also listed as CIS 218. 
Two lecture and two laboratory hours per week. 

CSC 221. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS I. 3. An introduction to discrete mathematics, 
logic, set theory, proof methods, combinatorics, counting principles, number sys- 
tems, matrices, functions and relations, and an introduction to graphs. Course is 
intended to develop abstract reasoning skills necessary in mathematics and in com- 
puter science. Prerequisites: MAT 100-101, 102 (or equivalent). Note: Also listed 
as MAT 221 . Fall. 

CSC 230. "C" PROGRAMMING I. 3. An introduction to programming in "C" Language. 
The course emphasizes basic constructs of "C" designing, building and testing "C" 
programs; and tailoring "C" programs to various computer systems. Prerequisite: 
CSC 201 or permission of instructor. 

CSC 231. "C" PROGRAMMING II. 3. Continues the topics of CSC 230. Includes 
advanced "C" programming techniques dealing with topics of file input/output, graph- 
ics, debugging techniques and object-oriented programming. The topics are covered 
in context of a structured programming environment. Prerequisite: CSC 230. 

CSC 256. STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING II. 3. Course extends the discussion of 
data structures covered in CSC 201 to include stacks, queues, linked lists, and bina- 



Mathematics / 1 39 



ry trees. An extended discussion of searching and sorting, recursion and run time 
behavior of algorithms. Prerequisites: CSC 201 . Also CSC/MAT 221 is recommend- 
ed. Spring. 

CSC 288. COBOL PROGRAMMING II. 3. Course using the COBOL languages to pre- 
pare business application programs. Topics include preparation of documentation, 
multiple control breaks, table processing, and sorting of files. Programming assign- 
ments are used to gain skills in these topics. Prerequisite: CSC 218. 

CSC 322. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS II. 3. Continues the topics of MAT/CSC 221 . 
Order Relations and structures; Trees; Algebraic Structures: semigroups and groups; 
Discrete probability; Linear Algebra; Machines and Complexity. Prerequisite: 
MAT/CSC 221 . Note: Also listed as MAT 322. Spring. 

CSC 345. COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND ASSEMBLER LANGUAGE. 3. 

Investigation of symbolic programming using mnemonic names for functions codes. 
Programming allowing full access to facilities of the computer. Cross-indexed listing, 
addressing, Boolean algebra assembler generated errors, and error dumps. 
Prerequisite: CSC 256 or 288 or permission of instructor. Note: Three lecture hours 
and one laboratory hour per week. 

CSC 406. INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE. 1, 2, or 3. Individual 
research chosen by the student, subject to approval by the Chair of the Department. 
Results to be presented at a seminar of the Department (staff and interested stu- 
dents). Prerequisite: Senior-level standing. Notes: Two copies of a written report 
must be furnished at this time, one to be kept in the College library and one in the 
Department. 

Courses of Instruction: MATHEMATICS 

MAT 100. FUNDAMENTALS OF COLLEGE ALGEBRA. 2. First part of a two-semes- 
ter sequence for the student with algebra background which is insufficient for place- 
ment into MAT 102 (College Algebra). Covers properties and operations on real 
numbers, linear equations in one variable, operations on polynomials and quadratic 
equations. Notes: Successful completion of this course is required to enroll in the 
second part of this sequence (MAT 101). Does not satisfy the general college core 
requirement in Computation Proficiency by itself. Three hours per week. Fall. 

MAT 101. INTERMEDIATE COLLEGE ALGEBRA. 2. Continuation of MAT 100. 
Covers simplifying rational expressions, solving polynomial and rational equations, 
graphing equations and conic sections, functions and their graphs, and solving sys- 
tems of equations and inequalities. Prerequisite: MAT 100. Notes: This course 
along with MAT 100 fulfills the general college core requirement in Computational 
Proficiency. College credit is awarded for either the MAT 100 and 101 sequence or 
for MAT 102, but not for both. Three hours per week. Spring. 

MAT 102. COLLEGE ALGEBRA. 3. Covers properties and operations on real num- 
bers, linear equations in one variable, operations on polynomials and quadratic 
equations, simplifying rational expressions, solving polynomial and rational equa- 
tions, graphing equations and conic sections, functions and their graphs, and solving 
systems of equations and inequalities. Prerequisite: Placement into the course 
under the College mathematics placement program. Notes: Satisfies the general col- 
lege core requirement in Computational Proficiency. College credit is awarded for 
either the MAT 100 and 101 sequence or for MAT 102, but not for both. Three hours 
per week. Fall, Spring. 

MAT 106. TRIGONOMETRY AND ADVANCED ALGEBRAIC TOPICS. 3. Course 
designed for students having good backgrounds in algebra and are preparing for 
enrollment in calculus. Emphasis on fundamental concepts of sine, co-sine, tangent, 



1 40 / Mathematics 



their graphical representations, and applications involving the trigonometric functions 
and vectors. Explorations of solutions of right and oblique triangles, trigonometric 
identities, and trigonometric equations. Also exploration of advanced algebraic topics 
including complex number theory, matrix algebra, and analytical geometry. 
Prerequisites: MAT 100-101, 102 (or equivalent) or permission of the Chair of the 
Department. Note: Counts toward the general education core requirements in 
Natural Science and Mathematics. Fall, Spring. 

MAT 109. INTRODUCTORY CALCULUS. 3. An elementary study of the differential 
and integral calculus of algebraic functions. Course includes a review of topics in 
algebra and analytic geometry when necessary. Prerequisite: MAT 100-101, 102 (or 
equivalent). Note: Counts toward the general education core requirements in Natural 
Science and Mathematics. Fall, Spring. 

MAT 201. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS. 3. A study of number 
systems structured characteristics, axiomatic and logical foundations; systematic 
development of the integers, rational numbers; real numbers; real numbers and their 
properties; informal geometry. Prerequisites: MAT 100-101, 102 (or equivalent) or 
permission of the Chair of the Department. Note: MAT 201 does not count toward 
the completion of the requirements for a major in mathematics. Fall, Spring. 

MAT 209. CALCULUS II. 3. Extension of theory of differential and integral calculus to 
include transcendental functions. Prerequisites: MAT 106 (or equivalent) and MAT 
109. Fall, Spring. 

MAT 221. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS I. 3. An introduction to discrete mathematics, 
logic, set theory, proof methods, combinatorics, counting principles, number sys- 
tems, matrices, functions and relations, and an introduction to graphs. Course is 
intended to develop abstract reasoning skills necessary in mathematics and in com- 
puter science. Prerequisites: MAT 100-101, 102 (or equivalent). Note: Also listed 
as CSC 221 . Fall. 

MAT 231. STATISTICAL CONCEPTS. 3. A first course in probability and statistics for 
students majoring in any of the academic disciplines. Emphasis on general descrip- 
tive statistics, fundamental concepts and procedures of statistical inference. Course 
serves as a foundation for further study of hypothesis testing techniques applicable 
to individual disciplines. Prerequisite: MAT 100-101, 102 (or equivalent). Fall, 
Spring. 

MAT 301. MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS. 3. Statistics of the distribution of samples 
and their use in estimation and in tests of hypothesis; universe, sample, parameters, 
confidence regions. Prerequisite: MAT 209. Fall, odd years. 

MAT 302. INTRODUCTION TO THEORY OF EQUATIONS. 3. A study of complex 
numbers and methods of solving equations of various degrees. Prerequisite: (or 
Corequisite): MAT 109. Spring, even years. 

MAT 303. INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ALGEBRA. 3. A study of the construction of 
number systems; introduction to theory of groups, rings, fields. Prerequisite: MAT 
109. Spring. 

MAT 304. INTRODUCTION TO LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3. Linear systems, dimensions 
and bases of vector spaces; matrices, determinants and solutions of systems; of lin- 
ear equations. Prerequisite: MAT 109. Fall. 

MAT 305. ELEMENTS OF MODERN GEOMETRY. 3. A critical study of geometry from 
various postulational systems. Fall, odd years. 

MAT 309. ELEMENTS OF ADVANCED CALCULUS. 3. Partial differentiation, multiple 
integration and series. Prerequisite: MAT 209. Fall. 



Mathematics / 141 

MAT 322. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS II. 3. Continues the topics of MAT/CSC 221 . 
Order Relations and structures; Trees; Algebraic Structures: semigroups and groups; 
Discrete probability; Linear Algebra; Machines and Complexity. Prerequisite: 
MAT/CSC 221 . Note: Also listed as CSC 322. Spring. 

MAT 401. ELEMENTARY THEORY OF NUMBERS. 3. Topics from elementary num- 
ber theory; properties of integers. Diophantine equations, congruencies; quadratic 
residues. Fall, even years. 

MAT 402. ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3. Study of ordinary differential 
equations of the first and second orders. Prerequisites: MAT 309 or permission of 
the departmental chair. Spring. 

MAT 406. INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN MATHEMATICS. 1, 2, or 3. Individual 
research chosen by the student with guidance by a faculty member, subject to 
approval by the Chair of the Department. Results to be presented at a seminar of the 
Department (staff and interested students). Prerequisite: Senior-level standing. 
Notes: Two copies of a written report must be furnished at this time, one to be kept 
in the College library and one in the Department. 

MAT 407. INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS. 3. Vector analysis and ordinary differential 
equation level. Techniques for finding conformal mappings, evaluating contour inte- 
grals, multivalued integrands, and integral transforms. Prerequisite: MAT 209. Fall, 
even years. 

MAT 459. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND STRATEGIES IN MATHEMATICS 9-12. 2. 

A continuation of EDU 458 that emphasizes the teaching of Mathematics at the sec- 
ondary school level. Course includes procedures and theories of teaching the vari- 
ous mathematical subjects, course design, materials, teaching and evaluation strate- 
gies specific to Mathematics. Prerequisite: EDU 458. Note: Open only to the 
Professional Year student. Fall. 

MAT 492. MATHEMATICS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 2. A study of the meth- 
ods, materials, and activities used in teaching mathematics in grades K-6. Methods 
based on recent scientific studies to introduce as early as possible important con- 
cepts and vocabulary dealing with sets, numbers and geometry. Prerequisites: MAT 
100-101 (or MAT 102) and 201 and Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 
Note: Also listed as EDU 492. Fall. 



142 /Nursing 



NURSING 

Professor: Harley 

Associate Professor: Pruden (Chair) 

Assistant Professors: Beaman, Brownfield, Foell, Kruger, Massey, Ruwe, Sarvey, 

Taylor, Thunberg 
Clinical Assistant: Strickland 



Student Organization: Student Nurse Organization. 

The professional nursing courses in this baccalaureate degree nursing program are 
planned to prepare graduates to function in present and emerging nursing roles as col 
laborative members of multidisciplinary health care teams. The liberal arts, biological, 
physical, and social science courses taken prior to the nursing courses provide a sound 
basis for humanistic, scientific nursing. Baccalaureate nursing education fosters the 
development of independent thinking, initiative, decision making, resourcefulness, and 
the ability to respond to changing needs and environments. 

Note: The credit hours for each course in the requirements are listed in the parenthe- 
ses. Each set of double course numbers represents a lecture course/laboratory 
course combination. 

NURSING MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Successful completion of admission standards for the professional nursing courses. 

• Prerequisite courses before commencing the professional courses: BIO *206/208 
(3/1), 311/313 (3/1) and 312/314 (3/1); CHE *1 20/1 21 (3/1), and 200/201 (3/1); PSY 
*1 1 (3); SOC *201 (3); Each of these courses must be passed with a grade of 
"C-." NUR 025 (3) and 200 (4); must be passed with a "C" grade. 

• Professional Nursing courses: NUR 302 (2), 311 (10), 316 (10), 401 (2), 431 (9), 472 
(9), 480 (2-3). 

• A "C" grade must be earned in each of the professional Nursing courses in order to 
progress within the program. 

Total: 76-77 semester hours; *14 of these may be used to fulfill general college core 
requirements. 

Admission to the Professional Nursing Courses 

The Department of Nursing has a predetermined number of student slots under the 
rules of the North Carolina Board of Nursing. The following criteria are the minimum cri- 
teria for consideration for admission and acquisition of these criteria does not guaran- 
tee admission into the nursing program. 

• Application to the major should be made by March 1 5 prior to the anticipat- 
ed entrance into the professional nursing courses. Acceptance into the 
College does not guarantee acceptance into the professional nursing cours- 
es. 

• Have a minimum grade point average of 2.50. A transfer student must have 
a minimum grade point average of 2.50 on at least nine hours of completed 
courses at Barton College; or, must have a minimum grade point average of 
2.50 on transferred course credit. 

• Have a grade of at least "C" in the prerequisite Nursing courses listed 
above, and a grade of at least "C-" in the prerequisite Biology, Chemistry, 
and Social Science courses listed above. 

• Submission of a completed application for admission to the Nursing Major. 



Nursing/ 143 



Submission of a completed physical form with the required immunizations 
and laboratory data. 

Provide signed statement of physical and mental ability to provide safe nurs- 
ing care to the public. 

Have an interview with a nursing faculty member, resulting in a positive rec- 
ommendation. 

Write an essay on "Why I want to be a nurse." 

Three (3) positive references. Two references should be academic and one 
reference should be from an employment supervisor. 
Complete uniform order form. 

Be recommended by either the Chair or by the Student Affairs Committee of 
the Department of Nursing. 

Active Military Student Admission 

The admissions standards into the professional nursing courses are the same for all 
students including active military applicants. Because of military imposed constraints, a 
person applying for nursing education while continuing in active duty military service 
are required to adhere to the following deadlines: 

• November 1 of the year before expected entrance into Upper Division 
Nursing: Submit all materials for admission to the Upper Division, junior- 
level nursing courses. 

• May 15: All criteria must be met by this date in order to be admitted to the 
new class for that year. 

• Any student not meeting these deadlines will not be considered for admis- 
sion until the following year. 

• Exceptions: If all the criteria are unable to be met by the deadline, a written 
plan for their accomplishment must be submitted to the Department of 
Nursing Student Affairs Committee at the time of application (November 1). 

Transfer Student Admission 

' A traditional student from another accredited baccalaureate or higher degree nursing 
program may submit completed coursework for review by Department of Nursing, 
Curriculum Committee. The acceptance or waiver of the course(s) will be contingent 
upon the theoretical and clinical laboratory congruence with the course offered by the 
Department of Nursing. A copy of the procedure to be followed by the traditional nurs- 

f ing student may be obtained in the Office of the Secretary Department of Nursing. 

Registered Nurse Student Admission 

The admissions standards into the professional Nursing courses are the same for all 
students including Registered Nurses and other students who have already completed 
i a Board of Nursing approved program for registered nurse licensure. Advanced place- 
ment examinations may be taken for the four major 300- and 400-level clinical courses: 
NUR 311, 316, 431, and 472. The following courses may be challenged: NUR 025, 
200, and 302. 






Dismissal of Nursing Students 

A student may be dismissed from NUR 200, 311, 316, 380, 431, 472, and 480 at any 
time for any one of the following reasons: 

• Unsafe practice related to course objectives; 

• Physical or emotional health problems that do not respond to treatment in a rea- 
sonable period of time as determined by the student's health provider, the Chair of 
the Department, and any combination of the following level coordinators, course 
nursing faculty, and the Department of Nursing Student Affairs Committee. 

• Physical or emotional health problems that interfere with successful attainment of 
course objectives. 

Dismissal at any time may occur by: 



144/ Nursing 



• Request for the student to withdraw from the program. 

• Earning a grade of "C-," "D," "F," or failure in clinical laboratory for work completed 
and prohibiting the student from continuing in the program. 

Additional Expenses for Nursing Majors 

A student must have access to an automobile. Other expenses (approximate) include: 

• Uniform: $175 (a one-time expense). 

• Liability insurance: $14.50 per year in the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior years. 

• Van and Lab Fees: $25 per semester. 

• Standardized Testing: $50. 

• Nursing pin: $1 00 at the time of graduation. 

• Equipment: $100 

Courses of Instruction: NURSING 

NUR 025. NORMAL NUTRITION. 3. Focus on food constituents and the physiologic 
function of nutrients in the body. Introduction to the study of food needs throughout 
the life cycle; practical and economical use of nutritionally adequate food patterns to 
fit widely different lifestyles; and techniques for evaluating food-related advertising 
and publications. Fall, Spring. 

NUR 070. HUMAN SEXUALITY. 3. Focus on the spiritual, psychological, physiological, 
social, cultural, and ethical aspects of sexuality throughout the life cycle. Note: Also 
listed as SOC 070. Fall, Spring. 

NUR 200. INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL NURSING. 4. Includes concepts 
and processes basic to professional nursing. Theoretical concepts include aspects of 
nursing role development, components of decision making, leadership, and critical 
inquiry. Processes include the nursing process, communication, health promotion 
and maintenance, and adaptation. Prerequisite: Prior to pre-registration for NUR 
200, the student must submit to the Department of Nursing a statement of physical 
and mental ability to provide safe nursing care to the public, complete immunization 
record and physical examinations. For nursing majors, or by permission of instructor. 
A 2.50 minimum grade point average. Spring. 

NUR 302. FOUNDATIONS OF PROFESSIONAL NURSING. 2. An introduction to the 
theoretical basis of nursing knowledge, the legal and ethical aspects of nursing prac- 
tice, and the historical influences on the nursing profession. Opportunity provided for 
examination of the significance of these factors within the context of current and 
future nursing practice. Prerequisite: NUR 200, or permission of instructor. Spring. 

NUR 311. THE NURSE AS CONTRIBUTOR IN DECISION MAKING. 10. Course 
designed to help the student implement the nursing process with healthy individuals 
and families. Focus on the contributing role of the professional nurse with clients who 
are the primary decision makers regarding health promotion and maintenance activi- 
ties. Learning opportunities provided for the student to identify normal stressors 
throughout the life cycle. Major focus on the development of leadership skills as a 
contributor to client care and to the review of research as the basis for planning care. 
Prerequisites: NUR 200, and admission to the professional nursing courses. Fall. 

NUR 316. THE NURSE AS ADVISOR TO THE CLIENT. 10. Focus on the role of the 
professional nurse as advisor in health promotion and maintenance activities. 
Emphasis upon shared decision making between client and nurse, improved leader- 
ship skills in the coordination of client care, and the utilization of research as a basis 
for implementing care. Prerequisite: NUR 31 1 . Spring. 

NUR 380. GUIDED NURSING STUDIES: ELECTIVE COURSE, 1, 2 OR 3. Designed 
to facilitate the student in assuming responsibility and accountability while studying a 
defined aspect of interest within nursing and/or the health care system. The student 



Nursing/ 145 



builds upon previous theoretical and clinical knowledge. The student, with the guid- 
ance and direction from a faculty member of the Department of Nursing, with collab- 
orating design the learning contract which will include the objectives, learning activi- 
ties, and criteria for evaluation. Prerequisite: NUR 31 1 or permission of Junior Level 
Coordinator. Fall, Spring. 

NUR 401. FOUNDATIONS OF NURSING KNOWLEDGE. 2. An introduction to nursing 
research methodology. Offers the opportunity to gain understanding of the research 
process and its applicability to nursing. Emphasis placed upon the critique of 
research studies and the role of the nurse in nursing research. Prerequisite: NUR 
316, or permission of instructor. Fall. 

NUR 431. THE NURSE AS PRIMARY PROVIDER. 9. Focus on the professional 
nurse's role as a primary provider in health promotion and maintenance. Emphasis 
on primary decision making, utilization of leadership skills in collaboration with other 
health team members and application of research as a basis for providing care. 
Clinical situations focus on those clients with severe alterations in health states 
whose decision making skills are severely impaired. Prerequisite: NUR 316. Fall. 

NUR 472. THE NURSE AS COORDINATOR AND COLLABORATOR. 9. Focus on 
the professional nurse's role as a collaborator and coordinator in health promotion 
and maintenance. Emphasis on collaborative decision making with clients, coordina- 
tion of health care with other members of the interdisciplinary health team, evaluation 
of research and its application to client care, therapeutic use of self, and demonstra- 
tion of leadership skills in managing small groups of clients. The complexities of giv- 
ing health care in a multicultural society are health status and clients of diverse 
socio-economic and cultural backgrounds. Prerequisite: NUR 431. Spring. 

NUR 480. ADVANCED NURSING STUDIES. 2 or 3. Designed to promote student 
responsibility and accountability while functioning as a collaborative member of the 
multidisciplinary health care team. The course builds upon previous clinical experi- 
ences and learning activities in the curriculum. The student, with guidance from fac- 
ulty and clinical preceptors, identify an area of interest in a professional nurse role. A 
learning contract (learning objectives, activities, and methods of evaluation) is estab- 
lished by the student with faculty guidance. Prerequisite: NUR 316, or permission of 
instructor. Fall, Spring. 



146 / Physical Education and Sports Studies 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS STUDIES 

Associate Professor: Duncan (Chair) 

Assistant Professors: Hall, Pridgen, Saintsing, Treanor, Wilkinson 

Instructor: Faithful 

Student Organization: Physical Education and Sports Studies Club. 

Note: All courses listed in the requirements are 3-hour courses except where noted 
with a number in parentheses. Each set of double course numbers represents a lec- 
ture course/laboratory course combination. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJOR (B.S.)/TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

REQUIRMENTS: 

• Health courses: HEA 202 (2), 340 (1). 

• Physical Education courses: PED 220, 221, 222 (2), 223 (1), 310, 314, 315, 326, 
422, 459 (2). 

• Sports Studies courses: SPS 250 (2), 363 (2), 365 (2), 453. 

• Biology course: BIO 219 (4). 

• Computer expectations: PED 260 (1). 

Total: 43 semester hours required for Physical Education. In addition, the student must 
complete the following requirements for Teacher Certification: 

• Courses in the general college core requirements prescribed for special area certifi- 
cation: BIO 101/103 (3/1), SCI 101 (2) and 102 (2), HIS 202, POL 201, PSY 223. 

• Completion of Cognate Studies of 24-33 semester hours. 

• Complete the Professional education courses: 

Prior to the Professional Semester: EDU 201, 458 (2); ENG 363; PSY 243, 323, 
During the Professional Semester: EDU 443 or 442 or 443 (2), 451 (2), 453 (2), 470 
(6). 

• Education Field Experience courses: EDU 01 1 (0), 022 (0) 033 (0), 044 (0). 

• Complete all Entrance Criteria requirements. 

Note: A grade of "D" is not acceptable in a major course or in a professional education 
course. 

Entrance Criteria Program 

The Entrance Criteria Program (ECP) is designed to screen candidates for 
teacher certification. This program requires data to demonstrate that the can- 
didate possesses the necessary competencies to be an effective teacher. 
There are specific time constraints on some of the requirements. The student 
is responsible for complying with all ECP guidelines. The student must suc- 
cessfully complete: 

Phase I: To be completed by the end of the Sophomore Year. 

SAT Scores on file 

Strong Interest Inventory 

Declaration of Major 

EDU 01 1 Practicum and EDU 022 Practicum 

NTE Core Battery I (General Knowledge) and Core Battery II 

(Communication Skills) 
Probability of Success Form 
Program Projection 

Student Advisement Document (Part A) 
2.50 GPA on all courses attempted 
Application to Teacher Education: Admission to candidacy for certification is 

contingent on successful completion of Phase I requirements. Upon 

admission to candidacy, a student may then register for upper-level (300- 

400) education courses. 



Physical Education and Sports Studies / 147 



Phase II: To be completed by the end of the Junior Year. 

EDU 033 Practicum 
2.50 GPA maintained 
Application for Student Teaching 
Student Advisement Document (Part B) 
Phase HI: To be completed by the end of the Senior Year. 
EDU 044 Teaching Skills Laboratory 
Departmental Recommendation for Student Teaching 
Student Teaching (minimum grade of "C") 
Video-taped Lesson from Student Teaching 

NTE Core Battery III Professional Knowledge and Teaching Specialty 
Student Advisement Document (Part C) 
Application for Certification 

SPORT MANAGEMENT MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

Health courses: HEA 201 (1), 210 (2). 

Physical Education course: PED 326. 

Sports Studies courses: SPS 250 (2), 252 (1), 365 (2), 453, 463. 

General Business courses: BUS 313, 321. 

Accounting courses: ACC 151, 152. 

Economics course: ECO *231 . 

Management course: MGT 361 . 

Marketing course: MKT 371 . 

Computer Expectations: CSC 050. 
Total: 41 semester hours; *three of these may be counted toward the general college 
core requirements in The Social Sciences. 

SPORTS SCIENCE MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Health courses: HEA 101 (1), 201 (1), 210 (2), 211 (1), 310 (2), 311 (2), 411. 

• Physical Education course: PED 326. 

• Sports Studies courses: SPS 250 (2), 252 (1), 363 (2), 365 (2), 453, 493. 

• Mathematics course: MAT *231 . 

• Biology courses: BIO 31 1/313 (3/1), 312/314 (3/1). 

• Chemistry courses: CHE •120/121 (3/1), -200/201 (3/1). 

• Physics courses: four semester hours. 

• Computer expectations: CIS 050. 

Total: 51 semester hours; *1 1 of these may be counted toward the general college core 
requirements in The Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Health course: HEA 202 (2). 

• Physical Education courses: PED 220, 221 , 310, 315, 422. 

• Sports Studies courses: SPS 250 (2), 252 (1), 453. 
Total: 23 semester hours. 

ATHLETIC TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: 

• This program is designed for the student with other majors wishing to prepare to be 
an athletic trainer. 

• Biology courses: BIO 21 9 (4) or 31 1/31 3 (3/1) and, 31 2/31 4 (3/1). 

• Health courses: HEA 101 (1), 201 (1), 210 (2), 211 (1), 310 (2), 311 (2), 411. 

• Physical Education course: PED 326. 

• Sports Studies course: SPS 365 (2). 
Total: 21-25 semester hours. 

Courses of Instruction: HEALTH 

HEA 101. HEALTHFUL LIVING. 1. Survey course covering a variety of health topics. 
Helps students clarify values relating to these topics. Fall, Spring. 



148 / Physical Education and Sports Studies 



HEA 201. FIRST AID AND CPR. 1. Course covering first aid and cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation taught according to American National Red Cross guidelines. Fall, 
Spring. 

HEA 202. FIRST AID/CPR/ATHLETIC INJURIES. 2. Covers the topics included in the 
American National Red Cross guidelines as well as the basics of athletic injuries. 
Prepares the student in the fundamentals of first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 
and the immediate treatment and rehabilitative care of injuries which commonly 
occur during the school day or during sports participation. Prerequisite: Physical 
Education teacher certification major or permission of the instructor. FalL 

HEA 210. BASIC FUNDAMENTALS OF ATHLETIC TRAINING. 2. Introductory course 
in athletic training. Emphasis in areas of organization, athletic trainer responsibilities, 
protective sports equipment, mechanisms of injury, recognition, treatment, evalua- 
tion, emergency procedures in sports, and basic taping skills. Prerequisite: HEA 
201 or 202. Corequisite: HEA 21 1 . Spring. 

HEA 211. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING I. 1. A combination of labo- 
ratory and practical experience in athletic training. Corequisite: HEA 210. 

HEA 310. ADVANCED CONCEPTS IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 2. Continuation of HEA 
210 with emphasis on specific sports injuries, therapeutic modalities, rehabilitation, 
and other health conditions related to sports. Prerequisite: HEA 210 and 211. 
Corequisite: 31 1 . Spring, odd years. 

HEA 311. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING II. 2. A combination of labo- 
ratory and practical experience in athletic training. Corequisite: HEA 310. Spring, 
odd years. 

HEA 330. HEALTH AND SAFETY FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 3. Acquisition of 
health and safety information which are pertinent to elementary school children. 
Includes identification of specific responsibilities of the elementary school educator 
for protecting and improving the health of school children. Exploration of elementary 
school health and safety curriculum and services. Prerequisite: Admission into the 
Teacher Education Program. Fall. 

HEA 340. HEALTH AND SAFETY FOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS. 1. Current issues 
in health and safety, the secondary school health curriculum, and effective teaching 
aids and techniques explored. Fall. 

HEA 411. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 3. Supervised practical 
experience in athletic training at either the college or high school level. Involves a 
minimum of 30 hours of field work for each hour of credit. Prerequisites: HEA 310 
and 31 1 and permission of Department Chair. Note: Involves 90 hours of field work. 
Fall, Spring. 

Courses of Instruction: PHYSICAL EDUCATION FITNESS. Any of these 
courses may be counted toward the Physical Fitness requirement in the 
Sports Science component in the general college core requirements. 

PED 100. AEROBIC SWIMMING. 1. 

PED 101. TOTAL FITNESS. 1. 

PED 102. JOGGING FOR FITNESS. 1. 

PED 103. AEROBIC DANCE. 1. 

PED 104. WALKING FOR FITNESS. 1. 

Courses of Instruction: PHYSICAL EDUCATION LIFETIME ACTIVITY. Any 

of these courses may be counted toward the Lifetime Activity requirement in 
the Sports Science component in the general college core requirements. 



Physical Education and Sports Studies / 149 



PED 110. WEIGHT TRAINING. 1. 
PED 111. TENNIS. 1. 
PED 112. BADMINTON. 1. 

PED 114. GOLF. 1. 

PED 115. SOCIAL AND FOLK DANCE. 1. 

PED 119. LIFEGUARDING. 1. 

PED 120. SWIMMING. 1. 

PED 121. BOWLING. 1. 

PED 123. SNOW SKIING. 1.* 

PED 125. RACQUETBALL. 1. 

PED 126. SCUBA. 1.* 

PED127.WALLYBALL. 1. 

"Course requires an extra fee. 

General College Core Requirement Placement Credit 

A student who participates in an intercollegiate sport for at least two years 
and a student who participates on the cheerleading team for at least two 
years receives one semester hour of placement credit in physical educa- 
tion. This credit may count for the Lifetime Activity requirement of the 
Sport Science component of the general college core requirement. No 
more than one semester hour of credit may be earned by participation in 
intercollegiate sports or cheerleading. 

Students with Disabilities 

A student who has a permanent disability which prevents participation in 
all or part of the Sports Science component of the general college core 
requirements may be allowed to modify this requirement. After the pre- 
sentation of a doctor's verification of the disability to the Departmental 
Chair, the requirement can be modified to comply with the restriction. If 
the student's disability is such that there can be no benefit from the Sports 
Science classes, then a petition for exemption from this requirement may 
be submitted through the normal petition procedure. Such a petition 
should be accompanied by appropriate medical recommendation. 

A student enrolled in a Sports Science activity course who becomes ill or 
injured to the extent that continuation in the course is not possible should 
elect to drop the course and enroll in the course in a later semester. 

Courses of Instruction: PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PED 220. TEAM SPORTS. 3. Covers the pedagogical skills involved in teaching team 
sports to novice, intermediate, and advanced skill levels. Team sports covered 
include basketball, soccer, volleyball, baseball/softball, and flag football. 
Prerequisite: SPS 250 or permission of instructor. Fall. 

PED 221. INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL SPORTS. 3. Covers the pedagogical skills 
involved in teaching individual/dual sports to novice, intermediate, and advanced skill 
levels. Individual sports covered include badminton, archery, track and field, tennis, 
and golf. Prerequisite: SPS 250 or permission of instructor. Spring. 

PED 222. GYMNASTICS AND RHYTHMS. 2. Covers the pedagogical skills involved in 
teaching gymnastics, rhythms and dance to novice, intermediate, and advanced skill 
levels. Prerequisite: SPS 250 or permission of instructor. Spring. 

PED 223. OUTDOOR PURSUITS. 1. An introduction to the broad area of outdoor pur- 
suits and the goals and benefits of participation in such activities. Multiple outdoor 
activities. Prerequisite: SPS 250 or permission of instructor. Note: Special fee 
required. 



150 / Physical Education and Sports Studies 



PED 260. MICROCOMPUTER APPLICATIONS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 1. 

Designed to provide an introduction to microcomputer applications for the prospec- 
tive physical education teacher. Course introduces word processing, spreadsheets 
and data bases with special emphasis placed on the realization that computers can 
and should be used in the physical education teacher's career. Fall. 

PED 310. ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR CLASSROOM TEACHING. 

3. Studies the philosophical base and the conceptual framework from which the ele- 
mentary school physical education curriculum can be developed and evaluated. 
Includes principles of motor learning, mechanical principles, and teaching styles. 
Movement experiences include learning, teaching, participation in general and per- 
sonal space awareness, mimetics and story plays, singing games, manipulative 
activities, stunts and tumbling, games of lower organization, relays, folk dance, 
rhythms, and lead-ups to sports skills. Other topics include effective class manage- 
ment, human wellness concepts, programs for children with special needs, teacher 
responsibilities, and legal liability. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher 
Education Program. Fall. 

PED 314. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS. 3. Promotes 
competencies in the selection, organizational, and evaluative skills necessary for 
providing an appropriate individualized physical education program to meet the phys- 
ical, emotional, and social needs of students with handicapping conditions. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. SPS 250 and 252. Spring. 

PED 315. PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS. 3. 

Studies the skills and curriculum included in junior and senior high school physical 
education programs. Observation of classes and programs in the public schools 
included. Prerequisite: PED 310. Spring. 

PED 320. ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TOR. 3. Studies the curriculum, conceptual considerations, and pedagogical skills 
involved in providing a developmental^ appropriate physical education program at 
the elementary school level. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Teacher Education 
Program. Fall. 

PED 326. KINESIOLOGY. 3. A study of human movement from the viewpoint of bio- 
mechanics, musculoskeletal anatomy and neuromuscular anatomy and neuromuscu- 
lar physiology, with the greatest emphasis on the mechanical aspects. 
Prerequisites: BIO 219 and at least junior standing in the major. Fall. 

PED 422. MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDU- 
CATION. 3. Theory and practice of evaluation and measurement: test construction, 
selection, use, administration, scoring and interpretation. Also includes elementary 
statistical techniques and work with specific tests. Prerequisites: PED 315 and at 
least junior standing in the major. 

PED 459. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND STRATEGIES IN PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TION. 2. A continuation of EDU 458 with emphasis on the methods and materials 
used and problems encountered in teaching Physical Education. The course 
includes course design, instructional procedures, and strategies used in teaching 
Physical Education. Prerequisite: EDU 458, open only to professional year stu- 
dents. Note: Class begins at midsemester. Fall. 

Courses of Instruction: SPORTS STUDIES 

SPS 250. INTRODUCTION TO SPORTS STUDIES. 2. Includes vocational opportuni- 
ties, history, relationships to education, social sciences, physical sciences, and cur- 
rent trends and issues in the field. Fall. 



Physical Education and Sports Studies / 151 



SPS 252. EARLY FIELD EXPERIENCE. 1. A supervised field experience in the stu- 
dent's Sports Studies major area. Prerequisite: SPS 250. Note: A minimum of 40 
hours in the field required. Physical education majors seeking teacher certification 
may not count this course toward graduation. Fall, Spring. 

SPS 363. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL BASES OF SPORTS. 2. A study 
of the personality, self-concept, motivation, group interaction, learning, perception, 
maturation, and other psychological and sociological phenomena as they apply to fit- 
ness, skill acquisition, and physical performance. Prerequisite: SPS 250. Fall. 

SPS 365. EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY. 2. A study of the basic physiological changes 
that accompany physical exercises, sports and movement. Included are the effects 
of the environment, altitude, nutrition, ergogenic aids, sex, and age and the implica- 
tions provided for developing conditioning programs. Prerequisites: BIO 219, PED 
326. 

SPS 453. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND SPORTS PROGRAMS. 3. A study of organization and administration as they 
apply to health, physical education, athletics, and other sports studies areas. Special 
emphasis on general management techniques, fiscal management, personnel 
administration, legality in operations, and public relations. Prerequisite: SPS 250 
and junior standing in the major. Spring. 

SPS 463. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN SPORTS STUDIES. 3. Supervised practical expe- 
rience in one of the various sports studies areas including physical education, sports 
administration and sports communications. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and 
of department chair, SPS 453. Note: Course is also offered as SPS 461 for 1 semes- 
ter hour, and as SPS 462 for 2 semester hours. Involves a minimum of 30 hours of 
field work for each hour of credit. May be taken more than once but no more than six 
semester hours may be counted toward graduation, and no more than three semes- 
ter hours may be taken in any semester. 

SPS 493. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN SPORTS STUDIES. 3. Individual research 
project selected and designed by the student with guidance of the instructor. The 
course is designed for students who have demonstrated the competence to do inde- 
pendent work. The student may be asked to present the study and its results at a 
seminar composed of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor 
and department chair. Note: Course is also offered as SPS 491 for 1 semester hour, 
and as SPS 492 for 2 semester hours. Fall, Spring. 



152 /Psychology 



PSYCHOLOGY 



Professor: Parker 

Associate Professor: Woodard (Chair) 

Assistant Professors: Hines, Hyatt 



Student Organization: Psychology Club. 

Note: All courses listed in the requirements are 3-hour courses except where noted 
with a number in parentheses. 

PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Psychology courses: PSY 110*, 333, 353, 382, 383, 395, 413, 453, 492 (6), 495. 
Choose one course from each of the following pairs: 323 or 433, 343 or 373, 357 or 
393. 

• Modern language courses: Two courses at the intermediate level (*201 and *202). 

• The following Education courses may be substituted for the foreign language require- 
ment: EDU 025 (2), 026 (2), and 027 (2). 

• A minimum grade point average of 2.00 required for entrance into the Psychology 
major and this average must be maintained in order to remain in good standing. 

• Two meetings with advisor each semester. 

Total: 48 semester hours; up to *nine hours of these may be counted toward the gener- 
al college core requirements. 

PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Psychology courses: PSY 110*, 333, 353, 382, 383, 395, 413, 433, 453, 460, 491, 
492 (6), 493, 495. Choose one course from each of the following pairs: 343 or 373, 
357 or 393. 

• Philosophy course: PHI 344. 

• A minimum grade point average of 2.00 required for entrance into the Psychology 
major. Average is to be maintained in order to remain in good standing. 

• Two meetings with advisor each semester. 

Total: 54 semester hours; *three hours of these may be counted toward the general 
college core requirements in The Social Sciences. 

PSYCHOLOGY/BUSINESS (B.S.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Psychology 3-hour courses: PSY 110, *333, 343, 353, 364, 382, 383, 413 or 433, 
453. 

• Psychology internship course, which must be business oriented: PSY 492 (6). 

• Business Programs and other 3-hour courses: ACC 151, ECO 231*, MGT 361, MKT 
371 . Choose one from either PHI 344 or PHI/MGT 345. 

• Elective Business Program courses: choose three 3-hour courses from either the 
Management or Marketing tracks. 

• Computer expectation: CIS 050. 

• A minimum grade point average of 2.00 required for entrance into the Psychology 
major. Average is to be maintained in order to remain in good standing. 

• Two meetings with advisor each semester. 

Total: 69 semester hours; *six hours of these may be counted toward the general col- 
lege core requirements in The Social Sciences. 

PSYCHOLOGY MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Psychology courses: PSY 110, 323 or 433, 453. Choose two courses from the fol- 
lowing: 333, 343 or 373, 353, 413, 495. Choose two courses from the following: 357, 
382, 383, 393, 395. 

Total: 21 semester hours. 



Psychology/ 153 

Courses of Instruction: PSYCHOLOGY 

PSY 110. INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY. 3. An introduction to the principles of 
behavior including an analysis of biological bases, cognitive processes, motivation 
and emotion, personality theory, life span development, deviancy and treatment, and 
social behavior. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in The 
Social Sciences. Fall, Spring. 

PSY 112. PSYCHOLOGY OF INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT. 3. A study of biological 
environmental conditions, emotions, patterns of thinking and other behavioral pat- 
terns which promote personality adjustment. Note: Counts toward the general col- 
lege core requirements in The Social Sciences. Fall, Spring. 

PSY 223. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 3. A study of the principles of human 
behavior as they apply to the learning process. Note: Counts toward the general col- 
lege core requirements in The Social Sciences only for students seeking teacher cer- 
tification. Note: Also listed as EDU 223. Fall, Spring. 

PSY 297. PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING. 3. A survey of the aging process with emphasis 
on the psychological, social, physical, emotional, and cognitive processes. Note: 
Required field trips and possible internship placements. Fall. 

PSY 323. PSYCHOLOGY OF THE EXCEPTIONAL INDIVIDUAL. 3. An introduction to 
the study of special education with emphasis on mental retardation, learning disabili- 
ties, visual and hearing impairments, behavioral and emotional disorders, and the 
academically gifted. Examination of methods of aiding exceptional individuals includ- 
ing screening and identification, assessment, techniques of systematic instruction 
and behavior change, early intervention, public school services, and residential alter- 
natives. Internship and field trips required. Prerequisite: PSY 110, 112, or 223. 
Note: Also listed as EDU 323. Fall, Spring. 

PSY 333. PSYCHOLOGICAL COMMUNICATIONS. 3. A study of the planning, inter- 
pretation, implementation, and communication of social science research. 
Prerequisite: PSY 382, or permission of the Departmental Chair. Spring. 

PSY 343. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. 3. A study of the factors involved in the 
physical, social, affective, and cognitive development of the individual throughout the 
life span. Prerequisite: PSY 110, 112, or 223. Note: Option of internship. Fall, 
Spring. 

PSY 353. INTRODUCTION TO PERSONALITY. 3. A study of the major theories of the 
development, organization, and dynamics of personality. Prerequisite: PSY 110, 
112, or 223. Fall. 

PSY 357. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT. 3. An overview of 
theories and techniques of psychological and educational assessment, including a 
review of observational techniques, psychometric principles, and methods of test 
construction which underlie the assessment process. Focus on major instruments 
and procedures used in assessment of intelligence, cognitive abilities, academic 
achievement, personality characteristics, psycho-pathology, vocational interest/apti- 
tudes, psychomotor skills, and psycho-neurological conditions. Prerequisite: PSY 
110, 112, 223. Spring. 

PSY 364. PERSONNEL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (INDUSTRIAL). 3. 

An analysis of organizational behavior using a systems approach to understand rela- 
tionships between productivity, satisfaction, various patterns of leadership and orga- 
nizational design, and the selection, placement, and training of employees. 
Applicable to industrial, governmental, military, and educational organizations. 
Prerequisite: PSY 1 1 0, 1 1 2, or 223. 



154 /Psychology 



PSY 373. PSYCHOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD. 3. A detailed study of the physical and 
psychological development of the child. Internship in public school may be required. 
Prerequisite: PSY 110, 112, or 223. Note: Option of internship or public school. 
Also listed as EDU 373. Fall, Spring. 

PSY 382. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN. 3. Design, execution, and analysis of individual 
and group experiments in selected problems of genera! psychology. Note: A two- 
hour laboratory is required in addition to the regular three hours of lecture per week. 
Prerequisites: PSY 1 1 0, 1 1 2, or 223. Fall. 

PSY 383. QUANTITATIVE METHODS. 3. A study of the theory and principles of the 
quantitative methods used in psychology and education. Emphasis placed on 
descriptive and inferential statistical procedures used in research. Note: A three-hour 
laboratory is required in addition to the regular three hours of lecture per week. 
Prerequisite: PSY 382. Spring. 

PSY 393. LEARNING AND MEMORY: THEORY AND APPLICATION. 3. An examina- 
tion of theories of learning, modern application of learning principles, behavior modifi- 
cation techniques, and other learning strategies. Discussion of memory processes 
such as storage, retrieval, and short term vs. long-term memory. Prerequisite: PSY 
110, 112, or 223. Spring. 

PSY 395. BIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOR. 3. An examination of the 
brain and nervous system and their involvement in sensation, perception learning, 
drugs, sleep, emotion and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 110, 112, or 223. 
Every two years. 

PSY 413. TECHNIQUES OF COUNSELING. 3. Counseling procedures and the func- 
tions of counseling and educational community, and psychological overview. Review 
of the importance of the teacher, student, parent, administrator, and community to 
the counseling programs. Introduction of basic techniques for counseling individuals 
and groups. Field trips may be a part of the course requirements. Prerequisite: PSY 
353 and 433. Fall. 

PSY 433. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY. 3. A study of the several forms of mental 
abnormality and current methods of therapy. Emphasis placed on the more serious 
disorders. Prerequisites: PSY 373. Fall, Spring. 

PSY 453. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 3. A study of the individual's interaction with others 
and with the institutions of society. Prerequisites: PSY 110, 112, 223, or SOC 201. 
Note: Also listed as SOC 424. Field trips to social agencies required. Spring. 

PSY 460. CONTEMPORARY FIELD PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 3. A seminar 
approach to the study of current issues involving human behavior. Emphasis on 
research and presentation of results to the class by student panels. Prerequisites: 
PSY 110 or 223, 343 or 353, 433 or 453, and approval by the department chair. 
Note: Extensive field trips required. Spring. 

PSY 483. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE. 3. A detailed study of the educational, 
physical, social, cultural and psychological development of the adolescent. 
Prerequisite: PSY 1 10, 1 12, or 223. Fall. 

PSY 491. METHODOLOGY. 3. A study of the techniques of formal research writing to 
prepare for the completion of the senior thesis. Includes the following steps of 
research: developing an original research idea, writing a formal thesis proposal, 
defending the proposal to the departmental faculty, collecting the necessary research 
data, and writing a significant portion of the thesis. Prerequisites: PSY 333 (com- 
pleted with at least a grade of "C") and an overall grade point average of at least 
2.00. Fall. 



Psychology/ 155 



PSY 492. INTERNSHIP. 6. Experience of working under supervision in a helping 
agency. Students individually assigned and continuously evaluated through the 
semester. Writing of research paper and presenting of the findings before the 
departmental faculty. Two copies of internship research paper to be filed with 
department. Final oral examination. Prerequisites: PSY 333 (completed with at 
least a grade of "C") and an overall grade point average of at least 2.00. Fall. 

PSY 493. SENIOR THESIS. 3. The writing of a thesis using the techniques of academ- 
ic research. Format of thesis similar to graduate-level programs, though not as 
extensive. Thesis to be presented before members of departmental faculty as an 
oral exam. Two copies of thesis to be filed with the department. Prerequisite: PSY 
491 . Spring. 

PSY 494. INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS. 1, 2, or 3. Research problem chosen coopera- 
tively by student and instructor. Results of research to be presented orally to depart- 
mental faculty and students. Two copies of thesis to be filed with the department. 
Prerequisite: PSY 1 10, 1 12, or 223. Fall, Spring. 

PSY 495. HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY. 3. The history of psycholo- 
gy from the Ancient Greeks until the present. Covers broad philosophical, social, 
medical, and intellectual influences. Modern psychological systems shown to have 
their roots in older ideas. Fall. 



156 / Religion and Philosophy 



RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY 

Professors: Billiard, Markham (Chair) 
Assistant Professor: Jones 



Student Organization: Alpha Lambda Honor Society. 

Note: All courses listed in the requirements are 3-hour courses except where noted 
with a number in parentheses. 

RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY MAJOR (B.A.) REQUIREMENTS: 

• Religion courses: REL *101 or *120, *102, 450 (1); choose one course from each of 
the following groups: 1 ) 303, 304, or 305; 2) 31 4, 31 6, or 31 9; 3) 321 , or 322. 

• Philosophy Course: choose one from PHI *201 , *21 1 , *212. 

• Areas of Concentration: choose two courses in each of two areas. 

Specific Cultural Traditions area: REL 110, 309, or 31 1 . 
Themes and Theories area: REL 331 , 333, 334, 335, 339; PHI 343, 345. 
Philosophy area: PHI 342, 344, 346, 483, or 484. PHI 343 may be included if 
not selected in the Themes and Theories area. 

• Elective Courses: choose six hours from within the department. 

• Language Courses (Greek or Modern): two courses at the intermediate level (*201 
and *202). 

Total: 43 semester hours; *15 hours of these may be counted toward the general col- 
lege core requirements. 

RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 

• Religion courses: choose two from REL 1 01 , 1 02, or 1 1 0. 

• Philosophy course: choose one from PHY 201 , 21 1 , or 21 2. 

• Elective courses: nine hours of upper-level departmental electives. 
Total: 18 semester hours. 

Courses of Instruction: GREEK 

GRK 101. ELEMENTARY GREEK I. 3. A study of the syntax and morphology of Koine 
Greek. Note: Counts toward the general college core requirements in the Global 
and Cross-Cultural Perspective. Fall, alternate years. 

GRK 102. ELEMENTARY GREEK II. 3. A study of the syntax and morphology of 
Koine Greek. Notes: Second semester continuation of GRK 101. Counts toward the 
general college core requirements in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. 
Spring, alternate years. 

GRK 201. INTERMEDIATE GREEK I. 3. Advanced grammar, with intensive reading 
from the New Testament, and with excursions into other Greek writers. Note: 
Counts toward the general college core requirements in the Global and Cross- 
Cultural perspective. Fall, alternate years. 

GRK 202. INTERMEDIATE GREEK II. 3. Advanced grammar, with intensive reading 
from the New Testament, and with excursions into other Greek writes. Notes: 
Second semester continuation of GRK 201. Counts toward the general college core 
requirements in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. Spring, alternate years. 

Courses of Instruction: PHILOSOPHY 

PHI 201. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. 3. An introduction to the perennial 
problems in Western philosophy. Note: Counts toward the general college core 
requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. 

PHI 211. HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY I. 3. A survey of Greek, early Christian, and 
medieval philosophers and their thoughts. Note: Counts toward the general college 
core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. 



Religion and Philosophy/ 157 



PHI 212. HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY II. 3. Philosophical developments beginning 
with the Renaissance and continuing to the contemporary period. Note: Counts 
toward the general college core requirements in the global and Cross-Cultural 
Perspective. 

PHI 342. LOGIC. 3. An elementary study of three basic areas of logical concern: 
meaning of semantics, formal logic, and scientific method. Fall, alternate years. 

REL 343. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION. 3.An examination of vigorous religions think- 
ing primarily within the Christian tradition. Fall, alternate years. 

PHI 344. ETHICS. 3. A study of classical and contemporary theories of morality. 
Spring, alternate years. 

PHI 345. BUSINESS ETHICS. 3. An exploration of ethical issues arising in the context 
of doing business, application of ethical theory to case studies representing a variety 
of business situations. Note: Also listed as MGT 345. Spring. 

PHI 346. CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY. 3. A study of six philosophical views: 
Pragmatism, Existentialism, Logical Analysis, Positivism, Marxism, and 
Contemporary Realism. Spring, alternate years. 

PHI 401. WESTERN POLITICAL THEORY: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL. 3. A review 
of the main currents of Western political theory from Plato to Locke. Note: Also list- 
ed as POL 401. 

PHI 402. WESTERN POLITICAL THEORY: MODERN. 3. A review of the main cur- 
rents of Western political theory from Montesquieu to the present. Note: Also listed 
as POL 402. 

Courses of Instruction: GENERAL RELIGION 

REL 101. INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE. 3. An introduction to the history, litera- 
ture, and religious teachings of the Bible. Note: Counts toward the general college 
core requirements in The Humanities and Fine Arts. Fall, Spring. 

REL 102. EXPLORING CHRISTIAN THOUGHT. 3. An introduction to the basic 
themes of Christian thought from early Christianity to the present, through an investi- 
gation of the historical settings and writings of several major Christian leaders. Note: 
counts toward the general college core requirements in The Humanities and Fine 
Arts. Fall, Spring. 

REL 110. WORLD RELIGIONS. 3. An introductory study of major living religions with 
particular attention to myth, nature, and traditions. Note: Counts toward the general 
college core requirements in the Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective. Fall, Spring. 

REL 120. INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE - HONORS. 3. An introduction to the liter- 
ature of the Bible, approached primarily through the literary genres of the Biblical 
writings and scholarly approaches to them. Brief coverage of Biblical history. 
Prerequisite: Registration by invitation or by permission of the instructor. Note: 
Counts toward the general education core requirements in The Humanities and Fine 
Arts. 

Courses of Instruction: BIBLICAL AREA 

REL 303. PAUL AND THE EARLY CHURCH. 3. A study of the theology of Paul and 
the early Christian Church through a critical examination of the relevant New 
Testament material. Spring, alternate years. 

REL 304. THE PROPHETS. 3. A critical, historical and theological study of the work of 
the prophets of Israel from Amos through Isaiah. Spring, alternate years. 

REL 305. THE LIFE AND TEACHINGS OF JESUS. 3. A study of the life and teach 



158 / Religion and Philosophy 



ings of Jesus through a critical evaluation of the gospels and an examination of the 
problems of the historical Jesus. Fall, alternate years. 

REL 306. THE LITERATURE OF THE BIBLE IN ENGLISH. 3. A study of Biblical writ- 
ers, and the major characters, places and events in the Bible and the apocryhpha 
which are needed for understanding Biblical references and imagery. Note: Also list- 
ed as ENG 300. Fall, alternate years. 

Courses of Instruction: HISTORICAL AREA 

REL 309. AFRICAN AMERICAN RELIGIONS. 3. An exploration of the development of 
African-American religion, considering the historical roots, social and cultural dimen- 
sions, impact on American religious life and culture, and contemporary trends. Note: 
Also listed as SOC 309. Spring. 

REL 311. NATIVE AMERICAN RELIGIONS. 3. An exploration of the development of 
Native American religions in North and South America, considering historical roots, 
social and cultural dimensions, conflict with European culture, and contemporary 
trends. 

REL 314. RELIGION IN AMERICA. 3. A study of the development of religion within 
American culture. Note: Also listed as HIS 314. Fall, alternate years. 

REL 315. HISTORY AND POLITY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF 
CHRIST). 3. An examination of the history and church government of the Christian 
Church (Disciples of Christ) from its origin to the present day. Fall. 

REL 316. THE MIDDLE AGES 3. A survey of the political, social, intellectual, econom- 
ic, and religious aspects of western European history from 500 to 1 500. Note: Also 
listed as HIS 316. Fall, alternate years. 

REL 319. EUROPE AND THE REFORMATION. 3. A study of religious and secular 
backgrounds of the Reformation and its effects. Note: Also listed as HIS 319. 
Spring, alternate years. 

Courses of Instruction: THEOLOGICAL AREA 

REL 321. BASIC CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY. 3. A systematic and critical introduction to 
the major doctrines of the Christian faith. Fall, alternate years. 

REL 322. MODERN CHRISTIAN THINKERS. 3. A study of the main movements of 
modern theology with primary emphasis given to reading selected works of twentieth 
century theologians. Fall, alternate years. 

REL 324. THEOLOGY AND MODERN LITERATURE. 3. A study of the relationship 
between theology and literature based upon an examination of selected literature 
from the modern period. Spring, alternate years. 

Courses of Instruction: THEMES AND THEORIES 

REL 330. THE EDUCATIONAL WORK OF THE CHURCH. 3. An introduction to 
Christian education with emphasis on how it furthers religious awareness in individu- 
als of all ages. Spring. 

REL 331. CHURCH AND MINISTRY. 3. A study designed to equip students with criti- 
cal and appreciative perspectives on the dilemmas and strengths of ministry. 

REL 334. CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICS. 3. A consideration of contemporary social 
problems and theological approaches to their solution. Spring, alternate years. 

REL 335. DEATH AND DYING. 3. A study of the religious, ethical, biological, sociolog- 
ical, and psychological dimensions of death and dying. Ethical evaluations of life and 
death decisions, particularly those arising through advances in contemporary medi- 
cine. Fall. 



Religion and Philosophy/ 159 



REL 339. CHRISTIAN WORSHIP. 3. A survey of the history of Christian corporate 
worship considering major Biblical, historical, and theological developments from 
Old Testament times to the present. Spring. 

Note: The Themes and Theories Area also includes the following Philosophy courses: 
PHI 343 and 345. 



Courses of Instruction: ADVANCED 

REL 450. SENIOR SEMINAR. 3. An examination, refinement, and application of 
insights gained in the study of religion and philosophy. Weekly seminars will help 
clarify ideas and experiences emerging from a concentrated study in the discipline. 

REL 480. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (PROBLEMS). 3. Note: This course is also 
offered as REL 481 for 1 semester hour, and as REL 482 for 2 semester hours. 



160 / Board of Trustees 

COLLEGE PERSONNEL 
Board of Trustees 



Officers 

Chairman: DARWIN McCAFFITY 
Vice-Chairman: MARSHALL TETTERTON 
Secretary: GORDON L JOYNER 

Term Expiring 1993 

JOHN A. ALLISON, Wilson, N.C. 

HOWARD ANDREWS, Rocky Mount, N.C. 

EDNA EARLE BOYKIN, Wilson, N.C. 

S. M. COZART, Wilson, N.C. 

SIDNEY EAGLES, Raleigh, N.C. 

ROBERT H. HACKNEY, Jr., New Preston, Conn. 

FLORENCE MOYE, Maury, N.C. 

ELY J. PERRY, Jr., Kinston, N.C. 

GEORGE T. STRONACH, III, Wilson, N.C. 

Term Expiring 1994 

GEORGIA CAMPION, Durham, N.C. 
VANCE T. FORBES, Wilson, N.C. 
PATRICK C. GRIFFIN, Washington, N.C. 
T. J. HACKNEY, Jr., Wilson, N.C. 
JAMES B. HUNT, Jr., Wilson, N.C. 
ROGER PAGE, Winston-Salem, N.C. 

Term Expiring 1995 

WALTER L. BROWN, Jr., Raleigh, N.C. 
JANIE D. GRIFFIN, Wilson, N.C. 
K. D. KENNEDY, Jr., Raleigh, N.C. 
JOHN F. LEE, Wilson, N.C. 
DARWIN McCAFFITY, Raleigh, N.C. 
GERALD QUINN, Warsaw, N.C. 
HARVEY B. RUFFIN, Wilson, N.C. 
MARSHALL TETTERTON, Rocky Mount, N.C. 
KENNETH THORNTON, McLean, Va.. 

Ministerial Representatives 

JAMES H. BUSSELL (1993), Williamston, N.C. 
THOMAS L. LAW (1994), Raleigh, N.C. 
CHARLES BARNES (1995), Goldsboro, N.C. 

Representatives of Alumni Association 

WILLIAM R. BATCHELOR (1993), Durham, N.C. 

ROGER PHILYAW (1994), Durham, N.C. 

KATHLEEN TRAYLOR-SINK (1 995), Winston-Salem, N.C. 

Ex-Officio Members 

DAVID L ALEXANDER (Georgia Presiding Minister of the Christian Church), Macon, Ga. 
JAMES B. HEMBY, Jr. (President of Barton College), Wilson, N.C. 
PAMELA DAVIS (President of Student Government Association), Selma, N.C. 
EVELYN S. PRUDEN (Faculty Representative), Wilson, N.C. 



Administration / 161 



Trustees Emeriti 

H. L BARNHILL, Williamston, N.C. 
JACK D. BRINSON, Arapahoe, N.C. 
K. D. KENNEDY, Wilson, N.C. 



COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 



President's Cabinet 

President: JAMES B. HEMBY, Jr. 

Vice President for Academic Affairs: F. MARK DAVIS 

Vice President for Business and Finance: GORDON L. JOYNER 

Vice President for Institutional Advancement: H. DALE ALMOND 

Vice President for Student Life: BOBBY D. WHITE 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



JAMES B. HEMBY, JR., President; B.A., Barton College; B.D., Vanderbilt University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Texas Christian University. 

RUSSELL RAWLINGS, Special Assistant for Public Relations; B.A., Barton College. 

KEITH TEW, Director of Publications; B.F.A., Barton College. 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 



F. MARK DAVIS, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College; B.A., 
Bryan College; M.A., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., Duke University. 

CONSTANCE M. SWARTZWELDER, Assistant to the Dean of the College; B.S., 
Mercyhurst College; M.S., East Carolina University. 

ALLARD C. BISSETTE, Director of Academic Computing. 

Office of Lifelong Education 

F. CLAYTON SESSOMS, Associate Dean for Lifelong Education and Summer 
Sessions; B.S.L., Holmes Theological Seminary; M.Ed., North Carolina State 
University. 

DONNA C. ROUTH, Assistant Director of Lifelong Education; A.B., M.Ed., University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Library 

SHIRLEY GREGORY, Library Director; B.A., Wake Forest University; M.S.L.S., 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

RICHARD FULLING, Reference Librarian; B.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S. 
Lib., University of Illinois. 

JOHN R. LITTLE, Reference Librarian; B.A., University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro; M.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

KATHY M. THOMPSON, Cataloguer; B.A., Auburn University; M.A., Appalachian State 
University. 

NORMA WILLIAMS, Library Assistant; B.S., Barton College. 



1 62 /Administration 

Office of the Registrar 

MURDINA D. MACDONALD, Registrar; B.A., The University of Hawaii; M.Div., 
Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; D.Phil., Oxford University. 

TERESA S. LEWIS, Assistant to the Registrar; B.A., North Carolina Wesleyan College. 

Career Services Center 

MARIE B. SUMEREL, Director of Career Services; B.A., North Georgia College; 
M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro. 

BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

GORDON L. JOYNER, Vice President for Business and Finance; B.A., Culver- 
Stockton College; M.Ed., Auburn University at Montgomery; Ed.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

JO CAROL LAFOND, Comptroller; B.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 
C.P.A. 

KATHRYN LAMM, Business Services Manager; B.S., Barton College. 

W. KENT WHEELESS, Computer Center Manager; B.S.S., Campbell University. 

BRENDA R. DAVIDSON, Bookstore Manager; B.S., Barton College. 

B. TODD WILLIAMS, Assistant Bookstore Manager; B.S., Barton College. 

IRMA L. CORBIN, Post Office Manager; B.S., Barton College. 

TONY G. TILLEY, Director of Food Service; B.S., Elon College. 

G. KEITH DAUGHETY, Director of Physical Plant; B.S., North Carolina Wesleyan 
College. 

BRUCE B. TINGLE, Director of Campus Safety; B.A., High Point University; M.P.A., 
North Carolina State University. 

INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT 

H. DALE ALMOND, Vice President for Institutional Advancement; B.A., Lynchburg 
College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

CHASE CROSSINGHAM, Director of the Annual Fund; B.A., M.A., University of South 
Carolina. 

GARY HALL, Director of Athletics; B.A., Barton College; M.A., Wake Forest University. 

DAN HENSLEY, Jr., Director of Planned Giving; B.A., B.D., Texas Christian University. 

JANE KORNEGAY, Director of Alumni Activities ; B.A., Mary Baldwin College. 

BETTY ZAVADA, Director of Grants and Research; B.A., Cleveland State University; 
M.Ed., Ohio University. 



Faculty/ 163 

STUDENT LIFE 

BOBBY D. WHITE, Vice President for Student Life; B.A., Barton College; M.Div., Duke 
University. 

ANTHONY BRITT, Director of Admissions; B.B.A., M.B.A., Campbell University. 

DAVID WEBB, Associate Director of Admissions; B.S., M.Ed., Campbell University. 

KATHY DAUGHETY, Associate Director of Admissions; B.A., Barton College. 

SHEILA MILNE, International Student Advisor; B.S., Barton College. 

CHRISTOPHER KILPATRICK, Admissions Counselor; B.S., Barton College. 

RODNEY MAYE, Admissions Counselor; B.S., Barton College. 

MIRIAM LANDING, Director of Financial Aid. 

BETTY LAMB WESTBROOK, Assistant Director of Financial Aid; B.S., Barton 
College. 

DORIS BARNES, Director of Health Services; B.L.S., Barton College; R.N. 

DUANE GROOMS, Director of Intramurals, Student and Special Activities; B.S., 
M.A.Ed., East Carolina University. 

ERIC CRAVER, Director for Greek Life and Leadership Development; B.A., M.A., 
University of Iowa. 

MORGAN DAUGHETY, Chaplain; B.A., Barton College; M.Div., Duke University. 

LORI NEFF, Director of Residence Life; Coordinator of Institutional Effectiveness; B.S., 
Manchester College; M.A. Bowling Green State University. 

JUDITH M. PARRISH, Associate Director of Residence Life; B.S., Barton College. 

KIM WATSON, Director of Counseling and Assistant to Vice President; B.S., M.A.Ed., 
East Carolina University. 

TEACHING FACULTY 

B. SUE BEAMAN (1978), Assistant Professor of Nursing and Sophomore Level 
Coordinator; B.S.N., M.S.N., East Carolina University. 

DOROTHY JANE BOSTICK (1969), Associate Professor of Music; B.A., Meredith 
College; M.M., Converse College 

JEFF BROADWATER (1992), Assistant Professor of History and Political Science; 
B.A., Harding University; J.D., University of Arkansas; M.A., PhD., Vanderbilt 
University. 

EDWARD C. BROWN (1959), Professor of Art; B.F.A., University of Texas; M.F.A., 
Columbia University. 

KATHRYN G. BROWNFIELD (1988), Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S.N. , M.Ed., 
University of Virginia. 

THOMAS HUGH BRUGH, JR. (1977), Professor of Biology; B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Auburn 
University. 

ROGER AUBREY BULLARD (1965), Professor of Religion; B.A., Union University; 
B.D., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; M.A., University of Kentucky; 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

ZHIXIONG CAI (1991), Assistant Professor of Mathematics; B.S., Sichuan Teachers 
College; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio University. 



164 /Faculty 

MARGARET S. CARTER (1993), Associate Professor of Education; B,S., M.S., 
Indiana University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

PAUL H. CROUCH (1967), Professor and Director of Drama; B.A., Barton College; 
M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., The Florida State University. 

PAUL H. DEMCHICK (1990), Assistant Professor of Biology; B.S., Drexel University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University. 

HUGHES DILLARD (1978), Assistant Professor of Business; B.A., Barton College; 
M.A., East Carolina University. 

DAVID M. DOLMAN (1987), Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Education; 
Director of Teacher Education; B.A., College of Wooster; M.A., Northwestern 
University; Ph.D., Loyola University of Chicago. 

CLAUDIA L. DUNCAN (1989), Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Physical 
Education and Sports Studies; B.S., Alderson-Broaddus College; M.Ed., University 
of Cincinnati; Ed.D., West Virginia University. 

ROBERT M. EDMONDSON (1991), Assistant Professor of Business; B.S., University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.B.A., Wake Forest University. 

RONALD E. EGGERS (1978), Assistant Professor of Business; Co-Chair, Department 
of Business Programs; B.A., M.A., M.B.A., East Carolina University. 

MARK F. FAITHFUL (1986), Instructor in Physical Education and Sports Studies; 
Head Basketball Coach; B.S., M.S., East Carolina University. 

BERNIE FERENCIK (1990), Associate Professor of Social Work; Director of Social 
Work Field Placement; A.B., Youngstown State University; M.S.W., The University 
of Hawaii; Ph.D., University of Akron. 

ROBIN FOELL (1990), Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S., Barton College; MSN, 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

ROBERT C. FRAZIER, SR. (1959) Professor and Chair, Department of Mathematics; 
B.A., Barton College; M.A., East Carolina University; M.S., University of Illinois; 
Ed.D., The Florida State University. 

MICHAEL S. FUKUCHI (1981), Associate Professor of English; B.A., Chaminade 
University; M.A., Fordham University, M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

GARL EDWARD GARBER (1993), Associate Professor of Education; B.S., 
Manchester College; A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., The Ohio State University. 

DOUGLAS A. GRAHAM (1968), Associate Professor of Biology; B.S., Wake Forest 
University; M.Ed., University of Virginia. 

TERRENCE L. GRIMES (1971), Professor of English; A.B., Yale University; M.A., 
Ph.D., Duke University. 

GARY W. HALL (1989), Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Sports Studies; 
Soccer Coach; B.A., Barton College; M.A., Wake Forest University. 

JOHN A. HANCOCK (1989), Assistant Professor of Art; Chair, Department of 
Communication, Performing and Visual Arts; B.F.A., Valdosta State College, M.F.A., 
East Carolina University. 

ANN HARLEY (1991), Professor of Nursing; B.S.N., M.S.N.; University of 
Pennsylvania; Ed.D., Columbia University 

HARLOW ZINSER HEAD (1974), Professor of Geography; B.S., M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Oregon. 

LARRY L. HINES (1993), Assistant Professor of Psychology; B.A., East Carolina 
University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 



Faculty/ 165 



EDWARD B. HOLLOWAY (1962), Associate Professor of History; College Archivist; 
B.A., University of Connecticut; A.M., University of Pennsylvania. 

LAURA HYATT (1993), Assistant Professor of Psychology; B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

ANAND P. JAGGI (1971), Professor of Economics; M. Com., Ph.D., Jabalpur 
University; M.B.A., Michigan State University. 

KATHERINE H. JAMES (1979), Professor of English; Chair, Department of English 
and Modern Languages; B.A., Rhodes College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Tennessee. 

GERALDINE V. JOLLY (1988), Assistant Professor of Business; B.S., University of 
Akron; M.A., Central Michigan University. 

JOE JONES, III (1991), Assistant Professor of Philosophy; A.B., Armstrong State 
College; M.A., University of Georgia; Ph.D., The Florida State University. 

RALPH KAPLAN (1989), Assistant Professor of Business; B.A., Queens College of the 
City University of New York; M.S., Ithaca College; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

J. WILLIAM KILGORE (1980), Professor of Chemistry; B.S., Hampden-Sydney 
College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 

JANE M. KOLUNIE (1990), Assistant Professor of Biology; B.A., Wheaton College; 
Ph.D., Rutgers University. 

MARY ANN KRUGER (1989), Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S., Georgia College; 
M.A.Ed., M.S.N., East Carolina University. 

ALAN LANE (1990), Assistant Professor of History; Chair, Department of History, 
Social Sciences, and Social Work; B.S., Northern State College; M.A., Bowling 
Green State University; Ph.D., Marquette University. 

PAUL N. LEE (1992), Assistant Professor of Communications; B.A., Minot State 
University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

WILLIAM JERRY MacLEAN (1970), Professor of History; A.B., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., East Carolina University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

COLEMAN C. MARKHAM (1981), Professor of Religion; Chair, Department of Religion 
and Philosophy; B.A., Wake Forest University; B.D., Southeastern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

JUNE ELAINE MARSHALL (1993), Assistant Professor of Education; B.A., Trenton 
State College; M.A.Ed., East Carolina University; Ed.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

SUSAN ELAINE MARSHALL (1986), Associate Professor of English; B.A., University 
of North Florida; M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida. 

THOMAS E. MARSHALL, III (1964), Associate Professor of Art; B.F.A., Virginia 
Commonwealth University; M.A.T., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

CHRISTINE W. MASSEY (1985), Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S., Wagner 
College; M.S.N., Duke University. 

JUDY B. McPHERSON (1991), Associate Professor of Education; B.A., Incarnate 
Word College; M.Ed., Ph.D., Texas A&M University. 

JOSEPH T. MESKEY (1990), Assistant Professor of Business; B.A., Indiana University 
of Pennsylvania; M.A., The Pennsylvania State University. 

KAY A. MITCHELL (1986), Assistant Professor of Business; Co-Chair, Department of 
Business Programs; B.S., Barton College; M.B.A., Campbell University: C.P.A. 



166 /Faculty 

BARBARA F. MIZE (1990), Assistant Professor of Education; Director of Field 
Experience; B.A., B.S., Blue Mountain College; M.A., University of South Florida. 

SHARON MONTANO (1985), Associate Professor of Spanish; B.A., M.A., Ohio 
University; Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany. 

RICHARD H. MOORE (1985), Associate Professor of Chemistry; A.B., College of 
Wooster; M.A., Wesleyan University; Ph.D., New Mexico State University. 

AMRUT W. NAKHRE (1972), Professor of Political Science; B.S., M.A., University of 
Saugor; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

TERESA C. PARKER (1978), Assistant Professor of Business; B.S., M.Ed., East 
Carolina University. 

WALTER RALEIGH PARKER, JR. (1971), Professor of Psychology; B.S., Wake 
Forest University; M.A. East Carolina University; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

C. BRIGGS PETWAY, JR. (1989), Assistant Professor of Accounting; B.A., B.S., 
Barton College; M.A., North Carolina State University; CPA. 

RENITA G. PETWAY (1985), Assistant Professor of Mathematics; B.S., University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro; M.S., North Carolina State University. 

NANCY R. PING-ROBBINS (1990), Associate Professor of Music; B.Mus., Indiana 
University; M.A., University of Northern Colorado; Ph.D. University of Colorado. 

RANDAL PRIDGEN (1988), Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Sports 
Studies; B.S., Barton College; M.S., North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University. 

EVELYN S. PRUDEN (1974), Associate Professor of Nursing and Chair, Department 
of Nursing; B.S.N., Vanderbilt University; M.Ed., North Carolina State University; 
M.S.N., East Carolina University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 

CHARLES W. RAKOW (1962), Associate Professor of Music; B.S., Knox College; 
M.S.M., Union Theological Seminary. 

MURALI K. RANGANATHAN (1991), Assistant Professor of Mathematics; B.S., 
Viverananada College; M.S., Indian Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Syracuse 
University. 

JENNIFER ANN REITMEYER (1984), Associate Professor of Art; B.S., M.F.A., Indiana 
State University. 

SUSAN E. RENTLE (1988), Associate Professor of Social Work; Director, Social Work 
Program; B.A., University of Evansville; M.S.W., St. Louis University. 

CAROL H. RUWE (1986), Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S., University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro; M.S., East Carolina University. 

WENDEE SAINTSING (1987), Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Sports 
Studies; Head Volleyball Coach; Women's Basketball Coach; B.S., High Point 
College; M.S., Appalachian State University. 

SHARON I. SARVEY (1988), Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S.N., M.S.N., East 
Carolina University. 

KAREN SCRIVEN (1990) Associate Professor of English; Director, Writing Programs; 
B.A., University of Toledo; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

E. DANIEL SHINGLETON (1970), Associate Professor of Sociology; B.A., Barton 
College; M.S.W., Virginia Commonwealth University. 

REBECCA G. SMITH (1986), Associate Professor of English; B.A., Barton College; 
M.A., North Carolina State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 



Faculty/ 167 



H. T. STANTON, JR. (1976), Associate Professor of Business; B.S., Barton College; 
M.A., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro. 

MARY E. STRICKLAND (1991), Clinical Assistant in Nursing; B.S., Barton College; 
M.S.N., East Carolina University. 

WEBSTER STRUTHERS (1992), Assistant Professor of Communications; B.S., West 
Virginia University; M.A., Marshall University. 

LORA STUTTS (1992), Instructor of Art; B.F.A., Southwest Texas State University; 
M.F.A., University of North Texas. 

CONSTANCE M. SWARTZWELDER (1984), Assistant Professor of Psychology; B.S., 
Mercyhurst College; M.S., East Carolina University. 

BRENDA TAYLOR (1988), Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S.N., Barton College; 
M.S.N., University of Alabama at Birmingham. 

FRANCES THUNBERG (1982), Assistant Professor of Nursing and Junior Level 
Coordinator; B.S.N., M.S.N., East Carolina University. 

LAURA J. TREANOR (1989), Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Sports 
Studies; B.S., Virginia Polytechnical Institute; M.A., The Ohio State University. 

GAYLA C. TURK (1986), Assistant Professor of Music; B.M., Westminster Choir 
College; M.M., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Ph.D., University of 
Kansas. 

MARTHA H. WELCH (1983), Assistant Professor of Mathematics; B.S., Meredith 
College; M.Math, University of Tennessee. 

RAYMOND E. WHELAN (1986), Associate Professor of French; B.A., St. Bernard's 
Institute; M.A., Pittsburg State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas. 

VIRGINIA A. WHITEHURST (1988), Professor of Music; B.M.Ed., Livingston State 
College; M.M., Florida State University; D.A., Ball State University. 

TODD WILKINSON (1988), Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Sports 
Studies; Head Baseball Coach; Assistant Athletic Director; B.A., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.S., East Carolina University. 

JOHN CHRISTIAN WILSON (1974), Professor of Art; A.B., Valdosta State College; 
M.F.A., University of Georgia. 

PHILIP D. WITHERINGTON (1966), Professor of Biology; Chair, Department of 
Biological and Physical Sciences; B.S., M.A., East Carolina University; Ph.D., The 
College of William and Mary. 

JO ANNE WOODARD (1989), Associate Professor and Chair, Department of 
Psychology; B.A., Bennett College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

EMERITUS FACULTY 

EUGENE GEORGE PURCELL, JR. (1957-1984), Professor Emeritus of Religion and 
Philosophy; A.B., M.Div., Duke University. 

ALLAN R. SHARP (1953-1991), Professor Emeritus of Religion and Philosophy, A.B., 
Transylvania University; B.D., Lexington Theological Seminary; Ed.D., Duke 
University; Litt.D., William Woods College. 

J. P. TYNDALL (1949-1990), Professor Emeritus of Biology; B.A., Barton College; 
M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ed.D., University of Florida. 



168 /Faculty 

JEFFERSON-PILOT FACULTY MEMBERS OF THE YEAR ANNUAL RECIPIENTS 



1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 



COLEMAN C. MARKHAM 

SUE M. ROBINETTE 

THOMAS E. MARSHALL, III 

DAVID M. DOLMAN 

KATHERINE H. JAMES and J. WILLIAM KILGORE 

CLAUDIA L DUNCAN and DOUGLAS A. GRAHAM 



Academic Calendar/ 169 



BARTON COLLEGE 

WILSON, N.C. 

Ninetieth Session 1993-1994 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

(Subject to Change) 



FALL SEMESTER 



New Student Orientation - 

Freshmen Thursday, August 19 

through Tuesday, August 24 

Transfers Thursday, August 19 

through Tuesday, August 24 

Continuing Students Arrive in Residence Halls Monday, August 23 

Freshmen and Transfer Registration Monday, August 23 

Evening School Registration - 6:00 p.m Monday, August 23 

Continuing Students Registration Tuesday, August 24 

Classes Begin - 8:00 a.m Wednesday, August 25 

Last Day for Adding Courses Tuesday, August 31 

Convocation - 1 1 :00 a.m Tuesday, September 7 

Parents' Day Saturday, October 2 

Mid-Semester Break Begins - 6:00 p.m Friday, October 15 

(Residence Halls close at 6:00 p.m.; Cafeteria at 1 :30 p.m.) 

Residence Halls open at 2:00 p.m.; Cafeteria at 5:00 p.m Tuesday, October 19 

Classes Resume - 8:00 a.m Wednesday, October 20 

Homecoming October 22-24 

Last Day for Dropping Courses - 2:00 p.m Monday, November 1 

Advanced Registration Period Tuesday, November 2 

Advisor/Advisee Meeting - 1 1 :00 a.m. 

Advanced Registration Week Monday, November 8 

through Friday, November 1 2 
Thanksgiving Break Begins - 6:00 p.m Tuesday, November 23 

(Residence Halls close at 6:00 p.m.; Cafeteria at 1 :30 p.m.) 

Residence Halls open at 2:00 p.m.; Cafeteria at 5:00 p.m Sunday, November 28 

Classes Resume - 8:00 a.m Monday, November 29 

Last Day for Requesting Changes in 

Final Examination Schedule Monday, November 29 

Classes End Tuesday, December 7 

Reading Break Wednesday, December 8 

Examination Period Begins- 1:00 p.m Wednesday, December 8 

Examination Period Ends Wednesday, December 15 

(Residence Halls close at 6:00 p.m.; Cafeteria at 1 :30 p.m.) 

SPRING SEMESTER 

Students Arrive in Residence Halls Sunday, January 9 

(Residence Halls open at 2:00 p.m.; Cafeteria at 5:00 p.m.) 

New Freshmen and Transfer Orientation and Registration Monday, January 10 

Evening School Registration - 6:00 p.m Monday, January 10 

Registration for Continuing Students Tuesday, January 1 1 

Classes Begin - 8:00 a.m Wednesday, January 12 

Last Day for Adding Courses Tuesday, January 18 

Mid-Semester Break Begins - 6:00 p.m Friday, March 4 

(Residence Halls close at 6:00 p.m.; Cafeteria at 1 :30 p.m.) 

Residence Halls open 2:00 p.m.; Cafeteria at 5:00 p.m Sunday, March 13 

Classes Resume - 8:00 a.m Monday, March 14 



1 70 / Academic Calendar 



Last Day for Dropping Courses - 2:00 p.m Monday, March 28 

Advanced Registration Period Tuesday, March 29 

Advisor/Advisee Meeting - 1 1 :00 a.m. 

Advanced Registration Week Monday, April 4 

through Friday, April 8 
119 
I 22 
I 27 
I 28 
I 28 



Honors Convocation - 1 1 :00 a.m Tuesday, Apr 

Last Day for Requesting Changes in Final Examination Schedule Friday, Apr 

Classes End Wednesday, Apr 

Reading Day Thursday, Apr 

Examination Period Begins - 2:00 p.m Thursday, Apr 

Examination Period Ends Thursday, May 5 

Commencement - 1:30 p.m Sunday, May 8 



1994 SUMMER SESSIONS 

First Term: May 16 - June 22 

Registration - 8:15 a.m Monday, May 16 

Classes Begin , Tuesday, May 17 

Last Day for Adding Courses Thursday, May 19 

Last Day for Dropping Courses Monday, June 6 

Last Day of Classes Tuesday, June 21 

Examination Day Wednesday, June 22 

Second Term: June 27 - August 4 

Registration - 8:15 a.m Monday, June 27 

Classes Begin Tuesday, June 28 

Last Day for Adding Courses Thursday, June 30 

Independence Day (College closed) Monday, July 4 

Last Day for Dropping Courses Monday, July 18 

Last Day of Classes Wednesday, August 3 

Examination Day Thursday, August 4 



Alumni Association / 171 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Barton College Alumni Association includes more than 13,000 graduates and 
former students. 

The Association is governed by the Alumni Council which is composed of the 
Executive Committee and not more than twelve nor less than six directors. 

Members of the Association are encouraged to take part in the organization's many 
activities, from fund raising to encouraging prospective students to consider the 
College. 

The Association calendar is highlighted by Homecoming each Fall. This event 
invites everyone to return to campus for a wide variety of activities including class 
reunions, athletic events, and the annual presentation of the Alumnus of the Year and 
other Alumni Achievement awards. 

Barton SCOPE, published quarterly, is a magazine for alumni and others interested 
in keeping in touch with the College and receiving up-to-date information. 



POLICY ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT 

Barton College has long been dedicated to maintaining and fostering a fair, humane, 
and responsible environment for all its students, faculty, and staff. Sexual harassment 
is considered a violation of policy and will be dealt with under the procedures which has 
been established. We affirm the EEOC Guidelines on Discrimination Because of Sex 
(Section 1604.11, November 1980) and advances, requests for sexual favors, and 
other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when: 

•Submission to such conduct is made explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an 
individual's employment or education; 

•Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for 
employment decisions affecting such individual; or 

•Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an 
individual's work or educational performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or 
offensive working environment, although the majority of incidents of sexual 
harassment involve a male supervisor, co-worker, or instructor harassing a woman, 
the law and the College policy also cover women harassing men, women harassing 
women, and men harassing men. The College strictly prohibits retaliation against 
individuals for bringing complaints of sexual harassment. 



172 /Calendar 





1993 Calendar 




JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 3 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


28 


28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S «/l T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 3 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 30 31 


30 31 








SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


1 2 


1 2 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 





1994 Calendar 




JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 


27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


30 31 


: 






MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 


1 2 


1 2 3 4 5 6 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 


1 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 




30 31 















Index/ 173 



INDEX 

Absences, Class, 52 

Academic Calendar, 169 

Academic Probation and Suspensions, 

Accounting Major, 78 

Accreditation, 5 

Administration, 161 

Admission of Students, 9 

Admission of Transfer Students, 9 

Advance Payment, 1 3 

Aid 

Self-Help, 33 

Financial, 14 
Alumni Association, 171 
American Studies Major, 125 
Art Education Major, 88 
Athletics, 38 
Auditing Courses, 49 
Awards, 33 
Biology Major, 64 
Bachelor of Liberal Studies, 58 
Biological & Physical Sciences, 64 
Board of Trustees, 1 60 
Bookstore, 38 
Buildings, 7 

Business Programs, Department of, 78 
Business Administration Major, 78 
Business, General, 81 
Calendar of 1993-1994, 172 
Career Services, 50 
Catalog Policies, 60 
Cell Biology Major, 66 
Ceramics Major, 87 
Charges, Regular, 12 

Terms of Payment, 13 
Chemistry Major, 66 
Class Attendance, 52 
Classification of Students, 49 
CLEP, 51 
College Costs, 12 
Commercial Design Major, 87 
Communication, Performing and 

Visual Arts Department, 86 
Communications Major, 90 
Computer Science, 136 
Continuous Enrollment, 54 
Correspondence & Extension Work, 51 
Concerts and Lectures, 37 
Counseling, 38 
Course Load Limitations, 49 
Course Numbering Plan, 64 
Dean's List, 53 
Degree Requirements, 42 
Degrees, 42 



54 



Disabled Students, Services, 59 
Drama, 91 
Drop/Add, 52 
Economics, 82 
Education, Media Center, 8 
Education, Department of, 106 
Education of the Deaf and 

Hard of Hearing, 106 
Elementary Education Major, 106 
English, and Modern Languages 

Department of, 116 
English Major, 116 
Environmental Science Major, 67 
Expenses, 12 

Experiential Education Program, 51 
Faculty, 163 
Financial Aid, 14 
French Major, 118 
Funds, Loan, 15 

General College Requirements, 43 
General Science Major, 67 
Geography, 125 
Government, Campus, 36 
G.P.A.,54 
Grade Appeal, 56 
Grading Systems, 52 
Grants, 19 
Greek, 36 
Health Services, 38 
Historical Sketch, 5 
History, Social Sciences, and 

Social Work Department of, 125 
History Major, 125 
Honor Code, 59 
Honor Scholarships, 22 
Honors Program, 48 
Housing, 38 
Independent Study, 49 
International Studies, 126 
Journalism, 90 
Language Laboratory, 8 
Library, 7 

Lifelong Education, 58 
Loan Funds, 15 
Location, 5 
Management, 83 
Map, 2, 3 
Marketing, 84 
Marshals, 35 

Mathematics, Department of, 1 36 
Mathematics Major, 136 
Media Center, 7 
Medical Technology Major, 67 
Middle School Education Major, 106 



174 /Index 



Music Education Major, 92 
Music Major, 91 
Nursing, Department of, 142 
Nursing Major, 142 
Organizations, Campus, 36 
Painting Major, 87 
Pass/Fail Courses, 50 
Personal Conduct, 40 
Placement Services, 50 
Photography Major, 87 
Physical Education and Sports 
Studies, Department of, 146 
Physical Education Major, 146 
Physics, 76 

Political Science Major, 126 
Post Office Sub-Station, 38 
President's List, 53 
Psychology, Department of, 152 
Psychology Major, 152 
Psychology/Business Major, 152 
Publications, 37 
Re-Admission, 1 1 
Refunds, 13 
Registration, 48 

Religion & Philosophy, Department of, 156 
Religion Major, 156 



Religious Life, 37 

Scholarships, 20 

Science Education Major, 69 

Sculpture Major, 87 

Sexual Harrassment, Policy On, 171 

Social Sciences, Department of, 125 

Social Studies Major, 126 

Social Work, 125 

Sociology Major, 129 

Spanish Major, 118 

Special Admission, 10 

Statement of Purpose, 6 

Student Conduct, 40 

Student Health, 38 

Student Information Release, 

Policies, 60 
Summer Sessions, 57 
System of Marking, 52 
Terms of Payment, 13 
Traffic Regulations, 41 
Transfer Information, 9 
TV Studio, 7 

Undergraduate Fellowship Program, 21 
Weekend College, 58 
Withdrawal from College, 52 
Writing Center, 8 



Index/ 1 75 

CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

The Mailing Address: 

BARTON COLLEGE 

Wilson, North Carolina 27893 

(919)399-6300 

For more detailed information about any matter contained in this bulletin, contact the 
appropriate office, depending on the nature of the inquiry, as follows: 

President 399-6308 

Matters of general interest to Barton College 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 399-6343 

Academic information and programs of study 

Vice President for Business and Finance 399-6328 

General financial matters; student financial accounts 

Vice President for Institutional Advancement 399-6358 

Gifts, bequests, and general fund-raising 

Vice President for Student Life 399-6365 

Information on admissions and financial aid, 

personal welfare and health of students, student activities 

and services, resident housing, withdrawal from college 

Registrar 399-6325 

Student academic records, transcripts, schedule 
information, veterans affairs 

Director of Admissions 399-6314 

Admissions information, requests for college literature 

Director of Career Services Center 399-6388 

Part-time, full-time, and summer job listings, internships opportunities, 
on campus recruiting, career counseling, CLEP testing 

Director of Financial Aid 399-6316 

Scholarships, grants, loans, financial assistance 

Associate Dean for Lifelong Education 399-6306 

Evening classes and special programs 

Director of Summer Sessions 399-6306 

Summer Sessions 

Director of Alumni Activities 399-6360 

Alumni activities 

Director of the Annual Fund 

Annual Giving 399-6532 

Special Assistant to President 

for Public Relations 399-6529 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room